BCom Requirements

Degree Requirements:
Bachelor of Commerce (BCom)

Number of Credits (Credits=Full Course Equivalents/FCE)
20.0. At least 10.0 credits must be offered by the Faculty of Arts & Science.
Level of Credits
Minimum of 13.0 at the 200/300/400-level
At least 6.0 at the 300/400-level, including at least 1.0 at the 400-level
Program Requirements
Management, Finance & Economics, or Accounting Specialist
(A minimum of 8.0 RSM/MGT credits, 8.0 other A&S credits)
Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)
1.85
Breadth Requirement
The Breadth Requirement can be completed in one of two ways: (a) at least 1.0 credit in each of 4 of the 5 categories below, or (b) at least 1.0 credit in each of any 3 of the 5 categories, and at least one 0.5 credit in each of the other 2 categories.
1 Creative and Cultural Representations
2. Thought, Belief, and Behaviour
3. Society and Its Institutions
4. Living Things and Their Environment
5. The Physical and Mathematical Universes

 

To qualify for a Bachelor of Commerce (BCom) degree, a student must:
 
a) Obtain standing (i.e., complete with a mark of 50% or higher/P/CR) in at least 20.0 credits that meet the following criteria:
  • At least 13.0 credits at the 200+ level, including a minimum of 6.0 credits at the 300+ level. No more than 1.0 credit at the 300+ level in transfer credit may be counted towards the minimum number of 300- and 400-level credits, except transfer credits attained through a University of Toronto exchange program.
  • At least 10.0 credits in Faculty of Arts & Science courses. Note that transfer credits attained through a University of Toronto exchange program contribute to this 10.0 credits minimum.
  • No more than 15.0 credits may have the same three-letter designator (“AST”, “ENG”, etc.). Courses beyond this limit will not be included in the 20.0 credits required for the degree, but will be counted in all other respects.
b) Complete one of the following program requirements: Specialist in Accounting, Specialist in Finance and Economics, or Specialist in Management
c) Complete the Arts & Science Breadth Requirement
d) Achieve a cumulative GPA of 1.85 or more by the time of graduation.
 

Program Requirements 

Completion of one or more programs is only one part of the general degree requirements. Variations made in program details for individual students do not in any way affect degree requirements. Programs are groupings of courses in one or more disciplines. 

Programs of Study are one of:

  • Specialist Program: a sequence of between 10.0 and 14.0 credits in one or more disciplines (note that some interdisciplinary Specialist programs may require up to 16.0 credits). Specialist programs must include at least 4.0 credits from 300+series courses, of which 1.0 credit must be at the 400-level. 
  • Major Program: a sequence of between 6.0 and 8.0 credits in one or more disciplines. Major programs must include at least 2.0 credits from 300+series courses, of which one 0.5 credit must be at the 400-level. 
  • Minor Program: a sequence of 4.0 credits in one or more disciplines. Minor programs must include at least 1.0 credit at the 300+level. 

Please note: Some courses included as program options may have prerequisites as requirements not listed in the program but which must be taken. Programs which list optional courses do not necessarily list their prerequisites. Students are responsible for fulfilling prerequisites; students enrolled in courses for which they do not have the published prerequisites may have their registration in those courses cancelled at any time without warning.

Students are required to:

  • Enrol in at least one and no more than three programs (of which only two can be Majors or Specialists), in the session in which they pass the course that brings them to a total of 4.0 credits. Bachelor of Commerce students complete either the Specialist in Accounting, Specialist in Finance and Economics, or Specialist in Management and can enrol in Major or Minor programs in other disciplines as well. 
  • Meet any enrolment requirements for a program as stated in the Calendar. 

Self-Designed Programs

In rare circumstances, a student may propose to design their own program, which must be substantially different from any program in this Calendar. Such cases are exceptional. Such a program, if formally adopted by the student’s College on the basis of its academic rigour and coherence, and if approved by the Office of the Dean, will be accepted as fulfilling the degree requirement for certification in a program (transcripts indicate only “Completed Self-designed Program approved by 'X’ College”). Since the approval process is necessarily a long one, students following this alternative must discuss this process with their College Registrar immediately after completion of 4.0 credits in the Faculty.

 

Breadth Requirement

The purpose of the Breadth Requirement is to ensure all students graduating with a degree from the Faculty of Arts & Science have chosen courses across a broad range of subject areas in the Faculty as part of their undergraduate education. 
 

The five Breadth Requirement Categories are: 

  1. Creative and Cultural Representations
    An appreciation for the diversity of cultural products, their meanings, and their socio-historical contexts through exposure to works in a variety of media and forms. Courses in this category focus on creative products and cultural expression, engaging students in activities such as the reading of texts, the learning of languages, and the study of art, film or oral traditions. These courses would normally focus on the conditions through which such works are produced, on their various interpretations in societal context, and on the ways in which those interpretations may have changed over time. 
     
  2. Thought, Belief, and Behaviour
    Familiarity with investigations of the mind and individual behaviour, and the formation and function of systems of meaning, belief, and communication. These courses explore the ways in which the mind perceives reality and makes sense of both the human and natural world. Their content may focus on the creation of meaning and the ways in which belief systems are sustained and reproduced, as well as on the communication of meaning through language and other symbolic systems. Many courses falling into this category centre upon understanding collective belief and the nature of human thought, and the ways in which these shape societal behavior and norms. 
     
  3. Society and Its Institutions
    Knowledge of societal organization, institutions, and systems, the ways they change over time, and the theories and models used to understand them. These courses include not only the study of social, economic and political systems, but also the ways in which humans arrange their built environments and manage environmental systems to meet their own needs. They will typically explore the social networks and systems that organize human lives and modify their environments. Courses in this category will generally approach these issues using social science methodologies and/or historical and critical analyses. Courses may also situate the issues explored in relation to relevant social theory (or theorists), models, or approaches to understanding societal problems. 
     
  4. Living Things and Their Environment
    A grasp of the principles and concepts of life and the relation between organisms and their natural surroundings, and the ability to make and evaluate observations about living things. This category includes courses broadly from the biological and environmental sciences, which develop an understanding of the study of life and its contexts; levels of organization range from molecules to the biosphere. Courses will cultivate an understanding of scientific methodology (the formulation of hypotheses, experimental design, and quantitative analysis methods), its application in the life sciences, and its limits in providing answers concerning biological and environmental questions.
     
  5. The Physical and Mathematical Universes
    An understanding of theories of the physical world and mathematical models, and the ability to apply them and to make and evaluate observations
    relating to them. Courses in the physical sciences study the constituents and mechanisms that govern the natural world, with an emphasis on non-living systems. Such courses develop an understanding of scientific methodology (the formulation of hypotheses, experimental design, and quantitative analysis methods), its application and its limits. 
 
The Breadth Requirement can be completed in one of two ways: 
  • at least 1.0 credit in each of 4 of the 5 categories, or 
  • at least credit in each of any 3 of the 5 categories, and at least one 0.5 credit in each of the other 2 categories.
Most courses in the Faculty of Arts & Science are classified into five Breadth categories by subject content. A few courses do not have a Breadth Requirement assigned and therefore do not count toward this degree requirement. Students may count towards the Breadth Requirement any course which has a Breadth designation, and in which they have achieved standing (a grade of 50% or higher/P/CR), including courses completed toward program (Specialist, Major, Minor) requirements. Courses that have been designated Extra can contribute toward the Breadth Requirement. 
 
A course’s Breadth designation can be found following the course description in the Calendar for the year in which the course is taken; in the instance where a course does not have a Breadth category, the Breadth Requirement will not appear in the course description. 
 
For example:
 
    HIS103Y1 Statecraft and Strategy: An Introduction to the History of International Relations [48L/20T] 
    An analysis of the development of the international system, from 1648 to 1945, which highlights
    the role of war as an instrument of national policy, as a determinant of the system of states and
    as a threat to international society.
    Exclusion: any 100-level HIS course, with the exception of AP, IB, CAPE, or GCE transfer credits.
    Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)
   
    HIS103Y1 counts as 1.0 credit in Category 3 (Society and Its Institutions).
   
    ENG215H1 The Canadian Short Story [36L]
    An introduction to the Canadian short story, this course emphasizes its rich variety of settings, subjects, and styles.
    Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG credit or any 4.0 credits
    Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)
 
    ENG215H1 counts as one 0.5 credit in Category 1 (Creative and Cultural Representations).
   
    ANT100Y1 Introduction to Anthropology [48L/12T]
    Society and culture from various anthropological perspectives: socio-cultural, biological,
    archaeological, and linguistic.
    Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4) 
    Society and its Institutions (3)
 
    ANT100Y1 counts as one 0.5 credit in Category 3 (Society and its Institutions) and one 0.5 credit in Category 4 (Living Things and Their Environment).