Course Changes in the 2020-21 Calendar

This page includes all changes to courses since the 2019-20 Calendar. Any questions about the courses below should be directed to the relevant academic unit.

Use the filters at the top of each section to find changes by type of change, program area, breadth requirement or distribution requirement. 

Ontario’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve. Changes will likely occur as the province and its municipalities adjust to new data about the virus. In these circumstances, please be advised that the manner of delivery of courses, co-curricular opportunities, programs and services is subject to change, in accordance with university policies. The University thanks its students, faculty, and staff for their flexibility during these challenging times as we work together to maintain the standards of excellence that are the hallmark of the University.

Courses with Changes
(Title, Description, Prerequisites/Exclusions/Corequisites, and Breadth Requirements)

For Course Code, Title and Description
Prerequisites, Corequisites, Exclusions

ABP100Y1 - Introduction to Academic Studies

Hours: 72S

This interdisciplinary, skills-focused course parallels the other component courses of the full-time Academic Bridging Program, supplementing those courses and helping students integrate their entire Academic Bridging experience, while providing intensive, workshop-style training in the fundamental skills needed for success in further university studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The course will also provide academic advising and planning, to help students understand and navigate university culture. Open only to Academic Bridging Program students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

ACT371H1 - Basic Reserving Methods For P&C Insurance

Hours: 24L/12T

Topics covered include reserving data and triangles, diagnoses methods that range from triangle of ratios of paid claims to reported claims to triangle of reported claim ratios. The syllabus also includes projection techniques. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: ACT240H1, STA257H1
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ACT372H1 - Basic Ratemaking Methods For P&C Insurance

Hours: 24L/12T

This course covers the basic ratemaking methods for P&C insurance. It assumes that students are familiar with traditional reserving diagnoses and projection methods. The syllabus would introduce concepts related to earning of exposures, on-level factors, catastrophe loading, large loss loading and credibility. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: ACT371H1
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Science

ACT460H1 - Stochastic Methods for Actuarial Science

Hours: 36L

Applications of the lognormal distribution, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, martingales, Ito's lemma, stochastic differential equations, interest rate models, the Black-Scholes model, volatility, value at risk, conditional tail expectation.

Prerequisite: ACT350H1/​STA347H1. (ACT370H1 strongly recommended)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ACT471H1 - Topics in Casualty Actuarial Science

Hours: 36L

Topic for 2016-2017: Advanced Ratemaking Methods for P&C Insurance

This course will cover advanced ratemaking methods for P&C insurance. It includes topics such as commercial insurance pricing, catastrophic pricing, reinsurance pricing and GLM aplications to P&C insurance.

(Offered in alternate years)

Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ACT475H1 - Insurance Products and Regulation with AXIS

Hours: 36L

Case studies using leading actuarial application AXIS. Examine key types of insurance products and their pricing and valuation. Review representative developments in insurance regulations in US, Europe and Canada. Other topics include a brief introduction of the use of AI in life insurance.

Prerequisite: ACT240H1, ACT245H1, ACT247H1
Corequisite: ACT348H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ANT208H1 - Medical Anthropology: an Evolutionary Perspective on Human Health

Hours: 24L/10T

Introduction to applied evolutionary medical anthropology. It explores evidence for the evolution of human vulnerability to disease across the life cycle (conception to death) and implications for health of contemporary populations in behavioral ecological, cross-cultural, health and healing systems, historical trauma, inter-sectionality, and climate change, lenses.

Recommended Preparation: ANT100Y1/​BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ANT348H1 - Medical Anthropology: Health, Power and Politics

Previous Course Number: ANT348Y1

Hours: 24L/5T

This course deepens students’ understandings of health and illness as social, cultural, political and historical phenomena. Drawing on theories and approaches from social-cultural anthropology, students will develop skills in critical analysis of experiences and meanings of healing and illness in particular contexts, with a focus on anthropological critique of dominant health policies, discourses, technologies and practices.

Prerequisite: ANT204H1 or ANT207H1 or permission of the instructor. (Note: ANT208H1 is not accepted preparation for this course.)
Exclusion: ANT348Y1
Recommended Preparation: ANT205H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ANT450H1 - Multispecies Cities

Hours: 24S

As of 2007, for the first time in human history, more than half the world’s peoples lived in cities. It is estimated that by 2030 over 60% will be urban-dwellers. This demographic shift suggests that for many (if not most) people, their primary encounter with “nature” will be urban based. This course explores the idea of “urban-nature” by 1) focusing on the ways in which various theorists have challenged traditional ways of viewing both “the city” and “nature” and 2) encouraging students to develop their own critical perspectives through ethnographic engagements with the city of Toronto.

Prerequisite: ANT204H1 or ANT207H1 and a 300-level course or above in Society, Culture and Language
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ANT458H1 - Settler-Colonialism and Indigenous Health in Canada

Hours: 24S

This course draws on anthropological and historical literatures to explore the relationship between the health of Indigenous people and Canadian settler-colonialism. In conceptualising this relationship, we focus on critical analysis of the role of biomedical health-care systems in settler-colonial governmentality, and how history is understood in discourses on Indigenous health.

Prerequisite: Any 300-level course in Society, Culture and Language or INS350H1 or INS355H1 or JFP450H1 or permission of the instructor
Recommended Preparation: ANT345H1 or ANT348H1 or ANT358H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

APM421H1 - Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics

Hours: 36L

Key concepts and mathematical structure of Quantum Mechanics, with applications to topics of current interest such as quantum information theory. The core part of the course covers the following topics: Schroedinger equation, quantum observables, spectrum and evolution, motion in electro-magnetic field, angular momentum and O(3) and SU(2) groups, spin and statistics, semi-classical asymptotics, perturbation theory. More advanced topics may include: adiabatic theory and geometrical phases, Hartree-Fock theory, Bose-Einstein condensation, the second quantization, density matrix and quantum statistics, open systems and Lindblad evolution, quantum entropy, quantum channels, quantum Shannon theorems.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - APM421H1/MAT1723H

Prerequisite: (MAT224H1, MAT337H1)/MAT357H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

APM426H1 - General Relativity

Hours: 36L

Einstein's theory of gravity. Special relativity and the geometry of Lorentz manifolds. Gravity as a manifestation of spacetime curvature. Einstein's equations. Cosmological implications: big bang and inflationary universe. Schwarzschild stars: bending of light and perihelion precession of Mercury. Topics from black hole dynamics and gravitational waves. The Penrose singularity theorem.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - APM426H1/MAT1700H

Prerequisite: MAT363H1/​MAT367H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

APM446H1 - Applied Nonlinear Equations

Hours: 36L

Partial differential equations appearing in physics, material sciences, biology, geometry, and engineering. Nonlinear evolution equations. Existence and long-time behaviour of solutions. Existence of static, traveling wave, self-similar, topological and localized solutions. Stability. Formation of singularities and pattern formation. Fixed point theorems, spectral analysis, bifurcation theory. Equations considered in this course may include: Allen-Cahn equation (material science), Ginzburg-Landau equation (condensed matter physics), Cahn-Hilliard (material science, biology), nonlinear Schroedinger equation (quantum and plasma physics, water waves, etc). mean curvature flow (geometry, material sciences), Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov (combustion theory, biology), Keller-Segel equations (biology), and Chern-Simmons equations (particle and condensed matter physics).

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - APM446H1/MAT1508H

Prerequisite: APM346H1/​MAT351Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

APM461H1 - Combinatorial Methods

Hours: 36L

A selection of topics from such areas as graph theory, combinatorial algorithms, enumeration, construction of combinatorial identities.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - APM461H1/MAT1302H

Prerequisite: MAT224H1/​MAT247H1, MAT137Y1/​MAT157Y1, MAT301H1/​MAT347Y1
Recommended Preparation: MAT344H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

APM462H1 - Nonlinear Optimization

Hours: 36L

An introduction to first and second order conditions for finite and infinite dimensional optimization problems with mention of available software. Topics include Lagrange multipliers, Kuhn-Tucker conditions, convexity and calculus variations. Basic numerical search methods and software packages which implement them will be discussed.

Prerequisite: MAT223H1, MAT224H1, MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1
Recommended Preparation: MAT336H1/​MAT337H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

APM466H1 - Mathematical Theory of Finance

Hours: 36L

Introduction to the basic mathematical techniques in pricing theory and risk management: Stochastic calculus, single-period finance, financial derivatives (tree-approximation and Black-Scholes model for equity derivatives, American derivatives, numerical methods, lattice models for interest-rate derivatives), value at risk, credit risk, portfolio theory.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - APM466H1/MAT1856H

Prerequisite: APM346H1, STA347H1
Corequisite: STA457H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

APM496H1 - Independent Readings in Applied Mathematics

Hours:

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member. Topic must be outside current undergraduate offerings. Similar workload to a course that has 36 lecture hours. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: minimum GPA 3.5 for APM and MAT courses. Permission of the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies and of the prospective supervisor
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

AST101H1 - The Sun and Its Neighbours

Hours: 24L/12T

Our place in the Universe. Phenomena we see in the sky. What we know about the Sun, the planets and comets, and the formation of the solar system – and how we know it. What makes planets suitable for life. Finding out about the nearest stars and their planets. This course is intended for students with no science or engineering background.

Exclusion: AST121H1, AST221H1. Also excluded are CIV100H1, CIV101H1, CIV102H1, any 100- or higher-series CHM/PHY courses taken previously or concurrently (with the exception of PHY100H1, PHY101H1, PHY201H1, PHY202H1, PHY205H1, PHY207H1, CHM101H1; and AP, IB, CAPE, and GCE Transfer Credits)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

AST201H1 - Stars and Galaxies

Hours: 24L/12T

What we know about the properties and life cycles of stars, of galaxies, and of the Universe itself – and how we know it. How astronomers develop methods for understanding phenomena that span such vast ranges in distance and time. This course is intended for students with no science or engineering background.

Exclusion: AST121H1, AST210H1, AST221H1, AST222H1. Also excluded are CIV100H1, CIV101H1, CIV102H1 and any 100- or higher-series CHM or PHY courses taken previously or concurrently (with the exception of PHY100H1, PHY101H1, PHY201H1, PHY202H1, PHY205H1, PHY207H1, CHM101H1; and AP, IB, CAPE, and GCE Transfer Credits)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

BCH440H1 - Protein Homeostasis

Hours: 24L

Protein homeostasis is dependent on the coordinated synthesis, folding, localization and degradation of the thousands of proteins in a living cell. This course deals with selected aspects of the process including: 1) mRNA synthesis, 2) ribosome structure and function, 3) translation initiation, elongation and termination, 4) protein folding and the role of chaperones, 5) protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system and 6) protein aging and disease. The course will serve as a foundation for those with an interest in how cellular protein levels and conformations are maintained.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​BCH242Y1; BCH311H1/​MGY311Y1/​PSL350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO230H1 - From Genes to Organisms

Hours: 36L/15P

The genome is the "book of life," providing instructions to construct an organism. This course introduces genome biology and explores how the building blocks of life are networked into functioning organisms. We will investigate how cells perceive internal and external cues, how gene expression is shaped by this perception, and how these events give rise to tissues, organs, and whole organisms. (Lab Materials Fee: $15). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: BIO130H1, (CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/(CHM138H1, CHM139H1)/CHM151Y1
Exclusion: BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CDN335H1 - Black Canadian Studies

Previous Course Number: UNI335H1

Hours: 24S

An interdisciplinary course that interrogates the constitution of blackness in Canada. Students will study race and ethnic relations, alongside other identity formations such as class, gender and sexuality. Topics to be addressed include media, education, law, immigration and mobility, urbanism, work, political representation and the arts.

Exclusion: UNI335H1
Recommended Preparation: CDN267H1 (formerly UNI267H1), CDN268H1 (formerly UNI268H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CDN355H1 - Digital Media, Digital Makers

Hours: 24S

This course will introduce students to quantitative research tools developed through the Digital Humanities. Students will learn to use online text analytics tools in order to understand how quantitative methods can support critical academic research of the study of Canada. Quantitative digital analysis will be applied to a wide range of Canadian digital academic archives and community hubs.

Recommended Preparation: CDN267H1, CDN268H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CDN367H1 - Canadian Pluralism

Previous Course Number: UNI367H1

Hours: 24S

Students will examine the complexities of social and cultural interaction in the context of changing Canadian demographics. This course compares and contrasts policies regarding indigenous rights, migration, multiculturalism, and citizenship with contemporary cultural narratives in literature, painting and film.

Prerequisite: CDN267H1/​CDN268H1 or permission of instructor
Exclusion: UNI320Y1, UNI367H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

CDN368H1 - Canada's Borders

Previous Course Number: UNI368H1

Hours: 24S

The Canadian border is being reshaped by the increasing transnational movement of people, goods and ideas. Students will examine border issues relating to mobility, trade, and security from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives, from public policy to contemporary media, such as TV, films, and novels.

Prerequisite: CDN267H1/​CDN268H1 or permission of instructor
Exclusion: UNI320Y1, UNI368H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CDN395H1 - Independent Study in Asian Canadian Studies

Previous Course Number: UNI395H1

Hours:

An opportunity to write an independent research paper in Asian Canadian Studies under direction of a faculty member. Students wishing to take this course must have their essay proposal and supervisor approved by the Canadian Studies Program Director. The application for enrolment should be made in the term preceding study. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CDN267H1/​CDN268H1 or permission of instructor
Exclusion: UNI395H1

CDN405H1 - The University in Canada

Previous Course Number: UNI405H1

Hours: 24S

This seminar course will address the role of universities in Canadian society and in the lives of Canadians. Students will explore both contemporary issues in Canadian higher education and consider the historical contexts from which they emerged.

Prerequisite: CDN367H1/​CDN368H1 or permission of instructor
Exclusion: UNI405H1
Recommended Preparation: CDN267H1, CDN268H1, CDN367H1, CDN368H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CHM135H1 - Chemistry: Physical Principles

Previous Course Number: CHM139H1

Hours: 36L/12T/18P

Structure of matter, gases, liquids and solids; phase equilibria and phase diagrams; colligative properties; chemical equilibria; electrolyte solutions and electrochemistry; reaction kinetics; introduction to thermodynamics. Recommended for students in life and health science programs that involve a small amount of chemistry. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).

Prerequisite: Chemistry SCH4U, Mathematics MHF4U + MCV4U
Corequisite: (MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT137Y1/​MAT157Y1 recommended, but may be required prerequisite in 2nd year Chemistry courses; PHY131H1, PHY132H1)/(PHY151H1, PHY152H1) recommended
Exclusion: CHM139H1, CHM151Y1, CHMA11H3, CHM140Y5, CHM110H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM136H1 - Introductory Organic Chemistry I

Previous Course Number: CHM138H1

Hours: 36L/12T/18P

An introduction to principles of structure and their relation to reactivity of organic molecules: molecular structure, stereochemistry, functional groups, and reactions. Recommended for students in life and health science programs that involve a small amount of chemistry. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).

Prerequisite: Chemistry SCH4U, Mathematics MHF4U + MCV4U, CHM135H1
Corequisite: MAT135H1/​MAT137Y1/​MAT157Y1 recommended, but may be required prerequisite in 2nd year Chemistry courses;(PHY131H1, PHY132H1)/(PHY151H1, PHY152H1) recommended
Exclusion: CHM138H1, CHM151Y1, CHM242H5, CHMB41H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM196H1 - The Quantum World and Its Classical Limit

Hours: 24S

This course seeks to demystify quantum mechanics and equip students to critically analyze popular depictions of quantum phenomena. While quantum mechanics provides a reliable description of the behavior of atoms, molecules and photons, most people are uncomfortable with some of its predictions, such as "quantum entanglement" between distant particles. In this course we will delve into key aspects of quantum mechanics and its more comfortable classical limit, focusing first on its manifestations in nature and then on fundamental issues such as uncertainty, interference, entanglement, and decoherence. This course will appeal to students with enthusiasm for physics. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Recommended Preparation: High school physics and mathematics
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM197H1 - Environmental Chemistry in a Sustainable World

Hours: 24S

Rapid and widespread industrialization is changing the chemical nature of the planet. In order to have a sustainable future, we need to manage chemicals released by humankind, and to understand their effects on the environment and on us. Each year, this seminar course will address the fundamental science behind a specific topic in this field, such as the interactions of our energy choices and the environment, changes in water and air quality, or exposure to biologically-active synthetic chemicals such as pharmaceuticals or personal care products. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Recommended Preparation: Minimum level of high school science and mathematics
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM198H1 - Biosensor Technology and Applications for the Non-Scientist

Hours: 24S

This breadth course introduces uses of and key ideas behind biosensor technology. Sensors will be familiar to all, playing key roles in our everyday lives, for example in touch screens or in automotive technology. Biosensor devices are fabricated from an electrical transducer which is intimately connected to a biochemical probe such as an enzyme or antibody. The idea is that a detectable electrical signal can be obtained when a target molecule or ion binds to the probe. Such a device offers many applications. These range from the detection of biological markers in blood and serum to test for genetic and infectious disease, to the selective monitoring of biomolecules for public safety, or in biotechnology or other industrial processes. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Recommended Preparation: Reading of book chapter on biosensor technology
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM199H1 - The Context of Chemistry: Origins, Concepts, Tools, and Challenges

Hours: 24S

Chemistry is a practical as well as a conceptual science that serves as the basis for applications in many other fields. The ideas and methods have evolved from diverse inputs leading to widely accepted sets of standard of facts. This collective knowledge has led to progress in the quality and understanding of life at a molecular level. While the facts of chemistry are taught in established courses, the context of what we know, the limitations and challenges of what chemistry can do and how we got to this point will be the targets for discovery by students in this course. The course will operate in a seminar model, combining presentations, readings, reports and discussions of current and historical issues. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Recommended Preparation: Grade 12 level chemsitry
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM222H1 - Introduction to Physical Chemistry

Previous Course Number: CHM225Y1

Hours: 24L/12T

Topics: introductory thermodynamics, first and second law and applications; chemical equilibrium. The course is intended for students who will be following one of the chemistry specialist programs (including Biological Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry) or who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their degree (such as those following a chemistry major program).

Prerequisite: [(CHM135H1/​CHM139H1, CHM136H1/​CHM138H1)/CHM151Y1 with a minimum grade of 63%], (MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT137Y1/​MAT157Y1,(PHY131H1, PHY132H1)/(PHY151H1, PHY152H1)
Corequisite: MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1
Exclusion: CHM220H1/​CHM225Y1, CHMB20H3, CHM221H5, JCP221H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM223H1 - Physical Chemistry: The Molecular Viewpoint

Previous Course Number: CHM221H1

Hours: 24L/12T

A continuation of CHM220H1 or CHM222H1 for students wishing to take some additional material in Physical Chemistry. The course covers topics in quantum mechanics and spectroscopy.

Prerequisite: CHM220H1 with a minimum grade of B, or CHM222H1
Corequisite: MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1 recommended, but may be required pre-requisite in 3rd year Chemistry courses
Exclusion: CHM225Y1/​CHM221H1, CHMB21H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM325H1 - Introduction to Inorganic and Polymer Materials Chemistry

Hours: 24L

Fashioned to illustrate how inorganic and polymer materials chemistry can be rationally used to synthesize superconductors, metals, semiconductors, ceramics, elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosets and polymer liquid crystals, with properties that can be tailored for applications in a range of advanced technologies. Coverage is fairly broad and is organized to crosscut many aspects of the field.

Prerequisite: CHM220H1/​CHM222H1/​CHM2225Y, CHM238Y1, CHM247H1/​CHM249H1
Exclusion: CHM426H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM395Y1 - Research Project in Chemistry

Hours: 180P

An independent research project conducted under the direction of a teaching faculty or research faculty member in the Department of Chemistry. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department before the end of the preceding Summer session. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 2.0 FCEs of CHM courses with a minimum cGPA of 3.0 in all CHM courses. Students are required to identify a potential faculty supervisor before contacting the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies for enrolment permission. Written confirmation is needed from both the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies and the prospective supervisor. Attendance at a mandatory safety orientation training session held during the first week of September.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM416H1 - Separation Science

Hours: 24L

This course provides theoretical and practical background useful for engaging in cutting-edge chemical separations in chemistry, biology, medicine, engineering, research, and industry. The course covers general separations concepts and principles, with an emphasis on liquid chromatography and its various modes, including partition chromatography, ion chromatography, enantiomer chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and affinity chromatography. Other topics include materials and instrumentation, gas chromatography, supercritical fluid chromatography, electrophoresis and related techniques, and a host of miscellaneous separation (e.g., TLC, FFF, CF) and extraction (e.g., LLE, SPE, SPME) modalities. Classes are supplemented with online/virtual laboratory exercises.

Prerequisite: CHM317H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM479H1 - Biological Chemistry

Hours: 24L

An in depth examination of biological systems at the molecular level. Several complex, multi-component molecular machines with a central role in life will be examined. For each system studied, the focus will be on understanding the chemical mechanisms that underlie the biological activities, and how these processes fit into a cellular context.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​BCH242Y1, CHM347H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM499Y1 - Introduction to Chemistry Research

Hours: 240P/16S

An experimental or theoretical research problem under the supervision of a teaching faculty or research faculty member in the Department of Chemistry. Five mandatory 90-minute professional development workshops cover aspects of academic writing, poster presentations, reading scientific literature, and job applications/interviews. Each student is required to attend a total of six one-hour research colloquia during the Fall and Winter Sessions. Applications for enrolment should be made to the Department in the preceding Winter Session with the deadline being the Friday before Reading Week: the application form is available at the Department of Chemistry website. Students are notified with the results of their application by the last week of March. Only students being admitted are required to contact chemistry faculty to discuss available research projects. Projects are in the areas of environmental, analytical, physical, inorganic, materials, polymer, organic and biological chemistry. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Minimum cGPA of 3.0 in CHM program courses. Research positions are limited. Students with strong background on courses in the sub-discipline of research interest will be given preference. Attendance at a mandatory safety orientation training session held during the first week of September.
Exclusion: CHM489Y5, CHMD90Y3, MSE498Y1, PHC489Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CIN349H1 - Screenwriting

Hours: 24S

Students will develop screenwriting skills under the guidance of a renowned screenwriter-in-residence through a combination of writing workshops and individual consultations. Like the course, the appointment of the Universal Screenwriter-in-Residence occurs biannually.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and two additional Cinema Studies full-course equivalents
Exclusion: INI388H1, VIC276H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

CLA197H1 - Death and Immortality in Ancient Thought

Hours: 24S

It seems natural for us to love life and hate death -- to long, therefore, for immortality. But are human beings in any way immortal? If so, where do we go — is there an 'afterlife'? Are our souls reincarnated? And are we really right to fear death, or is this somehow childish? What is death, and what exactly is it that we are so afraid of: the pain of dying, loss of the pleasures of life, non-existence? We will read a series of ancient texts which engage with these questions: the Mesopotamian epic Gilgamesh, Homer’s Odyssey, Euripides’ play Alcestis, Plato’s Phaedo, and De Rerum Natura by the Roman poet Lucretius. All are great works with many dimensions; while focusing on our themes we will try to make the most of what they have to offer. The course is designed for students to get practice at several important skills: close reading of complex texts, analysis of philosophical arguments, oral discussion, and essay-writing. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

CLA199H1 - Monsters

Hours: 24S

We will be examining the monsters of classical antiquity. How do we think of monstrosity today? What is the shape of this category in the Greco-Roman world? Why are our monsters not the same as theirs? What occasions the peculiar horror that one labels “monstrosity”?

We will look at the exotic, inhuman creatures of mythology. But we will also explore other genres like ethnographic writing and natural history where one entertains the idea that there are real monsters “out there” at the edge of the world. Similarly we will consider tragedy and its “human monsters”, people guilty of crimes such as incest and cannibalism. And lastly we will ponder the “monsters of history”, that is, the concrete historical individuals whose acts were so shocking that they could be described in the register reserved for the outlandishly inhuman. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

CLA362H1 - Early Greece

Hours: 36S

The Greek world from the second millennium B.C.E. to the emergence of the polis

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA230H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CLA363H1 - Archaic and Classical Greece

Hours: 36S

The Greek world from the eighth to the fourth centuries B.C.E., with an emphasis on political events and development.

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA230H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CLA364H1 - The Hellenistic World

Hours: 36S

The Greek world in the age of Alexander the Great and his successors (336 B.C.E. to 31 B.C.E.)

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA230H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CLA366H1 - Topics in the Study of Greek History

Hours: 36S

Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA230H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CLA367H1 - The Roman Republic

Hours: 36S

The Roman world from 510 B.C.E. to 44 B.C.E.

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA231H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CLA368H1 - Augustus and the Julio-Claudians

Hours: 36S

The Roman world in the age of Augustus and his dynasty (44 B.C.E. to 68 C.E.)

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA231H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CLA369H1 - The Roman Empire

Hours: 36S

The Roman world from 68 C.E. to 378 C.E.

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA231H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CLA371H1 - Topics in the Study of Roman History

Hours: 36S

Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA231H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CLA372H1 - The Economic History of the Classical World

Hours: 36S

The structure and performance of economies in the Greek and/or Roman worlds, and their modern interpretation.

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA230H1/​CLA231H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CLA373H1 - The Environment in the Greco-Roman World

Hours: 36S

An exploration of the ecology and environment of the ancient Mediterranean basin in classical antiquity.

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA230H1/​CLA231H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CLA378H1 - Late Antiquity

Hours: 36S

The history and culture of the Greco-Roman world during the fourth through seventh centuries C.E., with particular emphasis on the decline of the Roman state and emergence of Christianity.

Prerequisite: CLA160H1 + 1 of CLA231H1/​CLA233H1/​CLA260H1/​CLA210H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

COG341H1 - Issues in Cognitive Science I: Attention, Perception, and Consciousness

Hours: 36L

An examination of core topics in cognitive science building on introductions in COG250Y1. Typical topics include: perception and attention; concepts; imagery; consciousness.

Prerequisite: COG250Y1 and one of PSY270H1/​PHL342H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

COG342H1 - Issues in Cognitive Science II: Concepts, Theories of Mind, and Cognitive Evolution

Hours: 36L

An examination of core topics in cognitive science building on introductions in COG250Y1. Typical topics include: concepts; theories of mind; cognitive evolution.

Prerequisite: COG250Y1 and one of PSY270H1/​PHL342H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

COG343H1 - Issues in Cognitive Science III: Computational Cognition

Hours: 24L/12P

An examination of core topics in cognitive science building on introductions in COG250Y1. Typical topics include: computational models of cognition and learning, natural language processing, computer intelligence.

Prerequisite: COG260H1, CSC148H1, STA220H1/​PSY201H1
Corequisite: COG250Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CRI350H1 - Understanding Criminological Research

Hours: 36L

An introduction to social science research methods used by criminologists and to the statistical analysis of criminological data. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of published criminological research is developed. Specific technical issues related to sampling, measurement, and data analysis are taught in the context of examining ways of answering research questions.

Prerequisite: CRI205H1, CRI210H1, CRI225H1
Exclusion: SOC200H1, SOC200Y1, WDW350H1, WDW350Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSB202H1 - Further Exploration in Biotechnology

Hours: 24L/12T

Provides non-science students with an additional opportunity to explore biotechnology and its applications in agriculture, the environment, and human health including: genetically modified organisms, drug discovery and aging. Most lectures are viewed online before class and students work in groups during class on problem sets and case studies designed to stimulate further learning, enhance evidence-based reasoning, and promote reflection on the role of biotechnology in society. This course does not count towards CSB programs. CSB201H1 is not a prerequisite for this course.

Exclusion: BIO230H1, BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB329H1 - Stem Cell Biology: Developmental Models and Cell-based Therapeutics

Hours: 24L/12T

Stem cells provide the basis for cellular diversity in multicellular organisms and have enormous therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine. The course will introduce students to the differences and similarities between stem cells from different organisms, their roles throughout development and therapeutic potential.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB331H1 - Advanced Cell Biology

Hours: 36L

The development of multicellular organisms is dependent on complex cell-cell and cell-matrix dynamics. The course examines the molecules and mechanisms involved and how they act in concert to regulate distinct developmental and physiological events. Emphasis is placed on the experimental approaches and technology used to study the molecular interactions and dynamics that alter structure-function relationships in cells and organisms.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB346H1 - Neurobiology of Respiration

Hours: 24L/12T

This course examines how the central and peripheral nervous system controls breathing in mammals. Topics include how the brain generates rhythmic breathing movements, how sleep impacts breathing control and how abnormal breathing contributes to disorders such as sleep apnea.

Prerequisite: (BIO270H1, BIO271H1)/(PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB348H1 - Laboratory in Comparative Animal Physiology

Hours: 48P

Laboratory exercises will include traditional and guided inquiry approaches to investigate and gain an understanding of the regulation of physiological systems in vertebrates and invertebrates. Students will experience the nature of physiological investigation while being exposed to a range of the current experimental approaches animal physiologists use to design, test and evaluate hypotheses, and communicate their findings. This course will emphasize the fundamental characteristics humans share with all animal life and the physiological adaptations that have permitted species to exploit alternative environmental niches. This course requires participation and includes group work, written assignments, and oral presentations. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: BIO230H1
Exclusion: PSL372H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO270H1, BIO271H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB353H1 - Plant-Microorganism Interactions and Plant Immunity

Hours: 24L

Plants have co-evolved with microbes ever since their first appearance on land, resulting in sophisticated strategies of pathogenicity, symbiosis, commensalisms and mutualism. This course presents an overview of these strategies with examples of bacteria, fungi, oomycetes and viruses that have evolved intimate associations with plants, and discusses plant immune systems.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​BIO255H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO251H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB397Y0 - Research Abroad in Cell & Systems Biology

Hours:

An independent research project conducted in molecular biology, cell biology, developmental biology, neurobiology, physiology or systems biology. Whole organism, cell culture, in vitro or in silico studies are acceptable. The laboratory research is conducted by the student and supervised by a faculty member at an approved partner university. An information session is held each fall, and an application and interview process is required. The research is typically conducted from May to August. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 73% in BIO230H1/​BIO255H1/​BIO271H1 and permission of the CSB397Y0 coordinator
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB428H1 - Cytoskeletal Networks of the Cell

Hours: 12L/12T/12S

The cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic protein network that links all regions and components of the cell to provide a structural framework for organizing numerous cellular activities. This course will explore the molecular regulation of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons during cell migration and other cellular processes. Topics will include (1) an overview of key regulators of the cytoskeleton, (2) how they organize specific cellular structures, and (3) how the coordinated activities of cytoskeletal networks govern complex cellular behaviours. The format of this course is mainly journal club style presentations and student-led discussions of research papers, together with supporting background lectures. Experience with critical evaluation of research papers is emphasized.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 73% in BCH311H1/​CSB349H1/​MGY311Y1, minimum grade of 73% in BCH340H1/​CJH332H1/​CSB328H1/​CSB329H1/​CSB331H1/​CSB340H1/​CSB353H1/​CSB397Y0
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB432H1 - Advanced Topics in Cellular Neurophysiology

Hours: 12L/24S

This course examines cellular neurophysiological processes in the developing and mature nervous systems with a focus on: (1) understanding modern techniques used in neurophysiological research; and (2) interpreting the results from neurophysiological peer-reviewed manuscripts. This course is interactive and requires students to contribute actively during lectures and seminars, including conducting a group presentation.

Prerequisite: CJH332H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB445H1 - Topics in Sleep Research

Hours: 3L/33S

This course covers theories in why and how we sleep.  It will focus on the biological functions of sleep, how the brain generates different sleep states and how breakdowns in sleep mechanisms contribute to sleep disorders like insomnia, sleep walking and narcolepsy.  This course emphasizes student participation in seminar discussion and debates.

Prerequisite: (BIO270H1, BIO271H1)/(PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Recommended Preparation: CJH332H1/​CSB345H1/​PSY397H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB452H1 - Molecular Interactions Between Plants, Microorganisms and Parasitic Plants

Hours: 24L

This course explores the strategies that plants have evolved to defend themselves against microbes and parasitic plants. The course consists of two sections: 1. Plant - pathogenic microbe interactions and 2. Plant - plant parasite interactions. The first section focuses on an in-depth discussion about on-going research of plant immunity against pathogenic microbes. The second section introduces plant - parasitic plant relationships with an emphasis on signalling pathways that underlie these interactions and discusses how basic knowledge of the lifestyle of parasitic plants could contribute to agricultural solutions in the developing world.

Prerequisite: BCH311H1/​CSB349H1/​MGY311Y1
Recommended Preparation: CSB353H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB490H1 - Team-Based Learning: Current Topics in Cell and Molecular Biology

Hours: 8L/16S

A team-based learning course with emphasis on questions in the fields of protein biochemistry, synthetic biology, and the evolution of proteins and networks of protein-protein interactions. Lectures and seminars will focus on current research topics within these fields and will provide the background knowledge for students to work in teams to explore the primary research literature, and for each team to develop a formal research proposal. For details on this year's content, please go to the Undergraduate course section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca.

Prerequisite: BIO260H1/​HMB265H1, CSB330H1/​CSB349H1/​CSB352H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB491H1 - Team-Based Research: Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

Hours: 60P

CSB491H1 is a plant molecular biology lab that builds on molecular biology and biochemistry skills acquired in CSB350H1 or CSB330H1. After an initial training lab section, students will work in teams to develop a research project which they will conduct in the second half of the course. They will develop laboratory and teamwork skills that are desirable for them to function in a research laboratory and in the workplace. The course will integrate current molecular biology techniques, including designing and characterizing mutants made with CRISPR/Cas9. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: CSB330H1/​CSB350H1 with a minimum grade of 77% and approval of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB497H1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology I

Hours:

An original research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be mutually agreed upon by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. In the Fall or Winter sessions, a commitment of 8-10 hours per week is expected for research and related course activities. If spread over both the Fall and Winter sessions, a commitment of 4-5 hours per week is expected. In the Summer Session, the number of hours doubles per week (e.g., 16-20 for F or S, or 8-10 for Y) as the length of the term is halved compared to the Fall or Winter term. Many students spend more than this amount of time as they become immersed in their project. This course is normally open only to fourth year students with adequate background in Cell and Systems Biology. Course requirements include a final report, and either an oral presentation (Summer and Fall sessions) or a poster presentation (Winter session). Two workshops on scientific research are scheduled and highly recommended. Details for enrollment are available at the Undergraduate course section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Maximum of 2.0 FCEs allowed among CSB497H1, CSB498Y1 and CSB499Y1. (Lab Materials Fee: $25). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB498Y1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology I

Hours:

An original research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be mutually agreed upon by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. In the Fall/Winter session, a commitment of 8-10 hours per week is expected for research and related course activities. In the Summer session, the number of hours doubles (16-20 per week) as the length of the term is halved. This course is normally open only to fourth year students with adequate background in Cell and Systems Biology. Course requirements include a final report and either an oral presentation (Summer session) or a poster presentation (Fall/Winter session). Four workshops on scientific research are scheduled and highly recommended. Details for enrollment are available at the Undergraduate course section of the CSB website, http://csb.utoronto.ca. Maximum of 2.0 FCEs allowed among CSB497H1, CSB498Y1 and CSB499Y1. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB499Y1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology II

Hours:

Allows students to do a second independent project. Operates in the same manner as CSB497H1/CSB498Y1. Maximum of 2.0 FCEs allowed among CSB497H1, CSB498Y1 and CSB499Y1.  Students who have completed both CSB497H1 and CSB498Y1 are excluded from taking CSB499Y1. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CSB497H1/​CSB498Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSC104H1 - Computational Thinking

Hours: 24L/12T

Humans have solved problems for millennia on computing devices by representing data as diverse numbers, text, images, sound and genomes, and then transforming the data. A gentle introduction to designing programs (recipes) for systematically solving problems that crop up in diverse domains such as science, literature, and graphics. Social and intellectual issues raised by computing. Algorithms, hardware, software, operating systems, the limits of computation.

Note: you may not take this course concurrently with any Computer Science course, but you may take CSC108H1/CSC148H1 after CSC104H1.

Exclusion: JCC250H1; Any CSC course except CSC196H1, CSC197H1, CSC199H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC108H1 - Introduction to Computer Programming

Hours: 36L

Programming in a language such as Python. Elementary data types, lists, maps. Program structure: control flow, functions, classes, objects, methods. Algorithms and problem solving. Searching, sorting, and complexity. Unit testing. No prior programming experience required.

NOTE: You may not take this course concurrently with CSC120H1/CSC148H1, but you may take CSC148H1 after CSC108H1.

Exclusion: CSC110Y1, CSC120H1, CSC121H1, CSC148H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC148H1 - Introduction to Computer Science

Hours: 36L/24P

Abstract data types and data structures for implementing them. Linked data structures. Encapsulation and information-hiding. Object-oriented programming. Specifications. Analyzing the efficiency of programs. Recursion. This course assumes programming experience as provided by CSC108H1. Students who already have this background may consult the Computer Science Undergraduate Office for advice about skipping CSC108H1. Practical (P) sections consist of supervised work in the computing laboratory. These sections are offered when facilities are available, and attendance is required. NOTE: Students may go to their college to drop down from CSC148H1 to CSC108H1. See above for the drop down deadline.

Prerequisite: CSC108H1/​(equivalent programming experience)
Exclusion: CSC111H1, CSC207H1, CSC148H5, CSCA48H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC165H1 - Mathematical Expression and Reasoning for Computer Science

Hours: 36L/12T

Introduction to abstraction and rigour. Informal introduction to logical notation and reasoning. Understanding, using and developing precise expressions of mathematical ideas, including definitions and theorems. Structuring proofs to improve presentation and comprehension. General problem-solving techniques. Running time analysis of iterative programs. Formal definition of Big-Oh. Diagonalization, the Halting Problem, and some reductions. Unified approaches to programming and theoretical problems.

Corequisite: CSC108H1/​CSC120H1/​(equivalent programming experience)
Exclusion: CSC111H1, CSC236H1, CSC240H1, MAT102H5, CSCA65H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC207H1 - Software Design

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to software design and development concepts, methods, and tools using a statically-typed object-oriented programming language such as Java. Topics from: version control, unit testing, refactoring, object-oriented design and development, design patterns, advanced IDE usage, regular expressions, and reflection. Representation of floating-point numbers and introduction to numerical computation.

Prerequisite: 60% or higher in CSC148H1/​ 60% or higher in CSC111H1 (Please note: The minimum prerequisite grade in CSC148H1 is lower than the minimum grade for program admission in Computer Science. If you take this course when your grade in CSC148H1 is lower than the requirement for program admission, you will be unable to enrol in a Computer Science program. If you hope to enrol in a Computer Science program in future, please ensure that you satisfy the program admission grade requirements in CSC148H1 before completing CSC207H1.)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC236H1 - Introduction to the Theory of Computation

Hours: 24L/12T

The application of logic and proof techniques to Computer Science. Mathematical induction; correctness proofs for iterative and recursive algorithms; recurrence equations and their solutions; introduction to automata and formal languages. This course assumes university-level experience with proof techniques and algorithmic complexity as provided by CSC165H1. Very strong students who already have this experience (e.g. successful completion of MAT157Y1) may consult the undergraduate office about proceeding directly into CSC236H1 or CSC240H1.

Prerequisite: 60% or higher in CSC148H1/​ 60% or higher in CSC111H1, 60% or higher in CSC165H1/​ 60% or higher in CSC111H1 (Please note: The minimum prerequisite grade in CSC148H1 and CSC165H1/​CSC240H1 is lower than the minimum grade for program admission in Computer Science. If you take this course when your grade in CSC165H1/​CSC240H1 is lower than the requirement for program admission, you will be unable to enrol in a Computer Science program. If you hope to enrol in a Computer Science program in future, please ensure that you satisfy the program admission grade requirements in CSC165H1/​CSC240H1 before completing CSC236H1. Students will not be permitted to retake CSC165H1 after completing CSC236H1.)
Exclusion: CSC240H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC240H1 - Enriched Introduction to the Theory of Computation

Hours: 24L/12T

The rigorous application of logic and proof techniques to Computer Science. Propositional and predicate logic; mathematical induction and other basic proof techniques; correctness proofs for iterative and recursive algorithms; recurrence equations and their solutions (including the Master Theorem); introduction to automata and formal languages. This course covers the same topics as CSC236H1, together with selected material from CSC165H1, but at a faster pace, in greater depth and with more rigour, and with more challenging assignments. Greater emphasis will be placed on proofs and theoretical analysis. Certain topics briefly mentioned in CSC165H1 or CSC236H1 may be covered in more detail in this course, and some additional topics may also be covered.

NOTES:

If you completed CSC165H1 with a course grade less than 85, you should take CSC236H1 instead of CSC240H1.
Students may go to their college to drop down from CSC240H1 to CSC165H1 (or to CSC236H1 if they have already passed CSC165H1). See note in Calendar Section for the drop down deadlines.

Corequisite: CSC111H1/​CSC148H1; MAT137Y1/​MAT157Y1
Exclusion: CSC236H1, CSC263H1/​CSC265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC258H1 - Computer Organization

Hours: 24L/12T/36P

Computer structures, machine languages, instruction execution, addressing techniques, and digital representation of data. Computer system organization, memory storage devices, and microprogramming. Block diagram circuit realizations of memory, control and arithmetic functions. There are a number of laboratory periods in which students conduct experiments with digital logic circuits.

Prerequisite: 60% or higher in CSC111H1/​CSC148H1, 60% or higher in CSC111H1/​CSC165H1/​CSC240H1 (Please note: The minimum prerequisite grades in CSC148H1 and CSC165H1/​CSC240H1 are lower than the minimum grades for program admission in Computer Science. If you take this course when your grade in CSC148H1 or CSC165H1/​CSC240H1 is lower than the requirement for program admission, you will be unable to enrol in a Computer Science program. If you hope to enrol in a Computer Science program in future, please ensure that you satisfy the program admission grade requirements in CSC148H1 and CSC165H1/​​CSC240H1 before completing CSC258H1.)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC263H1 - Data Structures and Analysis

Hours: 24L/12T

Algorithm analysis: worst-case, average-case, and amortized complexity. Expected worst-case complexity, randomized quicksort and selection. Standard abstract data types, such as graphs, dictionaries, priority queues, and disjoint sets. A variety of data structures for implementing these abstract data types, such as balanced search trees, hashing, heaps, and disjoint forests. Design and comparison of data structures. Introduction to lower bounds.

Prerequisite: CSC236H1/​ ​CSC240H1/​ APS105H1/​ APS106H1/​ ESC180H1; STA237H1/​ STA247H1/​ ​STA255H1/​ ​STA257H1/​ ECE302H1/​ STA286H1/​ CHE223H1/​ CME263H1/​ MIE231H1/​ MIE236H1/​ MSE238H1/​ ECE286H1
Exclusion: CSC265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC300H1 - Computers and Society

Hours: 24L/12T

This course offers a concise introduction to ethics in computing, distilled from the ethical and social discussions carried on by today's academic and popular commentators. This course covers a wide range of topics within this area including the philosophical framework for analyzing computer ethics; the impact of computer technology on security, privacy and intellectual property, digital divide, and gender and racial discrimination; the ethical tensions with Artificial Intelligence around future of work and humanity, the emerging role of online social media over voice, inclusion, and democracy; and the environmental consequences of computing.

Prerequisite: Any CSC half course.
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSC301H1 - Introduction to Software Engineering

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to agile development methods appropriate for medium-sized teams and rapidly-moving projects. Basic software development infrastructure; requirements elicitation and tracking; estimation and prioritization; teamwork skills; basic UML; design patterns and refactoring; security, discussion of ethical issues, and professional responsibility.

Prerequisite: CSC209H1, CSC263H1/​CSC265H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC302H1 - Engineering Large Software Systems

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to the theory and practice of large-scale software system design, development, and deployment. Project management; advanced UML; reverse engineering; requirements inspection; verification and validation; software architecture; performance modelling and analysis.

Prerequisite: CSC301H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC303H1 - Social and Information Networks

Hours: 24L/12T

A course on how networks underlie the social, technological, and natural worlds, with an emphasis on developing intuitions for broadly applicable concepts in network analysis. Topics include: introductions to graph theory, network concepts, and game theory; social networks; information networks; the aggregate behaviour of markets and crowds; network dynamics; information diffusion; popular concepts such as "six degrees of separation," the "friendship paradox," and the "wisdom of crowds."

Prerequisite: CSC263H1/​CSC265H1, STA247H1/​STA255H1/​STA257H1/​ECO227Y1/​STA237H1, MAT221H1/​MAT223H1/​MAT240H1
Exclusion: CSCC46H3. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC304H1 - Algorithmic Game Theory and Mechanism Design

Hours: 24L/12P

A mathematical and computational introduction to game theory and mechanism design. Analysis of equilibria in games and computation of price of anarchy. Design and analysis mechanisms with monetary transfers (such as auctions). Design and analysis of mechanisms without monetary transfers (such as voting and matching). This course is intended for economics, mathematics, and computer science students.

Prerequisite: STA247H1/​STA255H1/​STA257H1/​STA237H1/​PSY201H1/​ECO227Y1, (MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT137Y1/​MAT157Y1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: MAT223H1, CSC373H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC309H1 - Programming on the Web

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to software development on the web. Concepts underlying the development of programs that operate on the web; survey of technological alternatives; greater depth on some technologies. Operational concepts of the internet and the web, static client content, dynamic client content, dynamically served content, n-tiered architectures, web development processes, and security on the web. Assignments involve increasingly more complex web-based programs. Guest lecturers from leading e-commerce firms will describe the architecture and operation of their web sites.

Prerequisite: CSC209H1/​ ESC180H1/​ ESC190H1/​ CSC190H1/​ (APS105H1, ECE244H1)
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC343H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC311H1 - Introduction to Machine Learning

Previous Course Number: CSC411H1

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to methods for automated learning of relationships on the basis of empirical data. Classification and regression using nearest neighbour methods, decision trees, linear models, and neural networks. Clustering algorithms. Problems of overfitting and of assessing accuracy. Basics of reinforcement learning.

Prerequisite: CSC207H1/​ APS105H1/​ APS106H1/​ ESC180H1/​ CSC180H1; MAT235Y1/​​ MAT237Y1/​​ MAT257Y1/​​ (minimum of 77% in MAT135H1 and MAT136H1)/ (minimum of 73% in MAT137Y1)/ (minimum of 67% in MAT157Y1)/ MAT291H1/​ MAT294H1/​ (minimum of 77% in MAT186H1, MAT187H1)/ (minimum of 73% in MAT194H1, MAT195H1)/ (minimum of 73% in ESC194H1, ESC195H1); MAT221H1/​​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1/​ MAT185H1/​ MAT188H1; STA237H1/​ STA247H1/​ STA255H1/​ STA257H1/​ STA286H1/​ CHE223H1/​ CME263H1/​ MIE231H1/​ MIE236H1/​ MSE238H1/​ ECE286H1
Exclusion: CSC411H1, STA314H1, ECE421H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC318H1 - The Design of Interactive Computational Media

Hours: 24L/12T

User-centred design of interactive systems; methodologies, principles, and metaphors; task analysis. Interdisciplinary design; the role of graphic design, industrial design, and the behavioural sciences. Interactive hardware and software; concepts from computer graphics. Typography, layout, colour, sound, video, gesture, and usability enhancements. Classes of interactive graphical media; direct manipulation systems, extensible systems, rapid prototyping tools. Students work on projects in interdisciplinary teams.

Prerequisite: Any CSC half-course/ ESC180H1/​ ESC190H1/​ APS105H1/​ APS106H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC300H1 provides useful background for work in CSC318H1, so if you plan to take CSC300H1 then you should do it before CSC318H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC320H1 - Introduction to Visual Computing

Hours: 24L/12P

Image synthesis and image analysis aimed at students with an interest in computer graphics, computer vision, or the visual arts. Focus on three major topics: (1) visual computing principles—computational and mathematical methods for creating, capturing, analyzing, and manipulating digital photographs (image acquisition, basic image processing, image warping, anti-aliasing); (2) digital special effects—applying these principles to create special effects found in movies and commercials; (3) visual programming—using C/C++ and OpenGL to create graphical user interfaces for synthesizing and manipulating photographs. The course requires the ability to use differential calculus in several variables and linear algebra.

Prerequisite: CSC209H1/​(CSC207H1, proficiency in C or C++); MAT221H1/​MAT223H1/​MAT240H1, (MAT136H1 with a minimum mark of 77)/(MAT137Y1 with a minimum mark of 73)/(MAT157Y1 with a minimum mark of 67)/MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC324H1 - Principles of Programming Languages

Hours: 24L/12T

Programming principles common in modern languages; details of commonly used paradigms. The structure and meaning of code. Scope, control flow, datatypes, and parameter passing. Two non-procedural, non-object-oriented programming paradigms: functional programming (illustrated by languages such as Lisp/Scheme, ML or Haskell) and logic programming (typically illustrated in Prolog).

Prerequisite: CSC263H1/​CSC265H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC336H1 - Numerical Methods

Hours: 24L/12T

The study of computational methods for solving problems in linear algebra, non-linear equations, and approximation. The aim is to give students a basic understanding of both floating-point arithmetic and the implementation of algorithms used to solve numerical problems, as well as a familiarity with current numerical computing environments.

Prerequisite: CSC148H1/​CSC111H1; MAT133Y1(70%)/(MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT135Y1/​MAT137Y1/​MAT157Y1, MAT221H1/​MAT223H1/​MAT240H1
Exclusion: CSC350H1, CSC351H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC343H1 - Introduction to Databases

Hours: 36L

Introduction to database management systems. The relational data model. Relational algebra. Querying and updating databases: the query language SQL. Application programming with SQL. Integrity constraints, normal forms, and database design. Elements of database system technology: query processing, transaction management.

Prerequisite: CSC111H1/​ CSC165H1/​ ​CSC240H1/​ ​(MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT135Y1/​ MAT137Y1/​ ​MAT157Y1/​ (MAT186H1, MAT187H1)/ (MAT194H1, MAT195H1)/ (ESC194H1, ESC195H1); CSC207H1/​ ECE345H1/​ ESC190H1
Exclusion: CSC443H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC367H1 - Parallel Programming

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to aspects of parallel programming. Topics include computer instruction execution, instruction-level parallelism, memory system performance, task and data parallelism, parallel models (shared memory, message passing), synchronization, scalability and Amdahl's law, Flynn taxonomy, vector processing and parallel computing architectures.

Prerequisite: CSC258H1, CSC209H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC369H1 - Operating Systems

Hours: 24L/12T

Principles of operating systems. The operating system as a control program and as a resource allocator. The concept of a process and concurrency problems: synchronization, mutual exclusion, deadlock. Additional topics include memory management, file systems, process scheduling, threads, and protection.

Prerequisite: CSC209H1, CSC258H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC373H1 - Algorithm Design, Analysis & Complexity

Hours: 36L/12T

Standard algorithm design techniques: divide-and-conquer, greedy strategies, dynamic programming, linear programming, randomization, network flows, approximation algorithms. Brief introduction to NP-completeness: polynomial time reductions, examples of various NP-complete problems, self-reducibility. Additional topics may include approximation and randomized algorithms. Students will be expected to show good design principles and adequate skills at reasoning about the correctness and complexity of algorithms.

Prerequisite: CSC263H1/​CSC265H1
Exclusion: CSC375H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC384H1 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Hours: 24L/12T

Theories and algorithms that capture (or approximate) some of the core elements of computational intelligence. Topics include: search; logical representations and reasoning, classical automated planning, representing and reasoning with uncertainty, learning, decision making (planning) under uncertainty. Assignments provide practical experience, in both theory and programming, of the core topics.

Prerequisite: (CSC263H1/​​ CSC265H1/​ ECE345H1/​ ECE358H1/​ MIE335H1, STA237H1/​ STA247H1/​​ STA255H1/​​ STA257H1/​ STA237H1/​ ECE302H1/​ STA286H1/​ CHE223H1/​ CME263H1/​ MIE231H1/​ MIE236H1/​ MSE238H1/​ ECE286H1)/ Permission of the Cognitive Science Director
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC324H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC385H1 - Microprocessor Systems

Hours: 24L/12T/36P

Microprocessor and embedded systems: Software techniques for real-time task creation and management. Connected device charachteristics and the hardware and software ramifications. System construction and management. An examination of the issues unique to or particulaly important to embedded computing. Laboratory experiments provide "hands on" experience. An open team project is done in the last few laboratory sessions.

Prerequisite: CSC258H1; CSC209H1/​proficiency in C
Exclusion: CSC372H1, ECE385H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC396Y0 - Designing Systems for Real World Problems

Hours:

This Summer Abroad special offering provides students with an opportunity to explore new environments, which improves their ability to see their own world with increased sensitivity and germinates new design ideas. In this course, students will identify a real problem in the world and work in groups on projects addressing this problem. Students will explore their problem space and the people within that space, identify needs, constraints, and requirements, and ultimately design solutions. Their designs will be iterated by gathering feedback and conducting usability testing on the early prototypes. The course projects will culminate with development of a technological solution that addresses the identified problem. Final project presentations will take place at the end of the course. This course can be counted as 0.5 FCE at the 300-level for Computer Science program completion.

Prerequisite: Any CSC half course, and balloting
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC399Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Hours:

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rop. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.

CSC401H1 - Natural Language Computing

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to techniques involving natural language processing and speech in applications such as information retrieval, speech recognition and synthesis, machine translation, summarization, and dialoque. N-grams, corpus analysis, neural methods, and information theory. Python and other software.

Prerequisite: CSC207H1/​ CSC209H1/​ APS105H1/​ APS106H1/​ ESC180H1/​ CSC180H1; STA237H1/​ STA247H1/​​ STA255H1/​ ​STA257H1/​ ECE302H1/​ STA286H1/​ CHE223H1/​ CME263H1/​ MIE231H1/​ MIE236H1/​ MSE238H1/​ ECE286H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: MAT221H1/​MAT223H1/​MAT240H1 is strongly recommended
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC404H1 - Introduction to Video Game Design

Hours: 24L/12T

Concepts and techniques for the design and development of electronic games. History, social issues, and story elements. The business of game development and game promotion. Software engineering, artificial intelligence, and graphics elements. Level and model design. Audio elements. Practical assignments leading to team implementation of a complete game.

Prerequisite: CSC301H1/​CSC317H1/​CSC318H1/​CSC384H1/​CSC417H1/​CSC418H1/​CSC419H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

CSC410H1 - Software Testing and Verification

Hours: 24L/12T

Concepts and state-of-the-art techniques in quality assessment for software engineering; quality attributes; formal specifications and their analysis; testing, verification, and validation.

Prerequisite: CSC207H1, CSC236H1/​CSC240H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC330H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC412H1 - Probabilistic Learning and Reasoning

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to probability as a means of representing and reasoning with uncertain knowledge. Qualitative and quantitative specification of probability distributions using probabilistic graphical models. Algorithms for inference and probabilistic reasoning with graphical models. Statistical approaches and algorithms for learning probability models from empirical data. Applications of these models in artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Prerequisite: CSC311H1/​ CSC411H1/​ STA314H1/​ ECE421H1/​ ROB313H1/​ CSCC11H3
Exclusion: STA414H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC413H1 - Neural Networks and Deep Learning

Previous Course Number: CSC321H1/CSC421H1

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to neural networks and deep learning. Backpropagation and automatic differentiation. Architectures: convolutional networks and recurrent neural networks. Methods for improving optimization and generalization. Neural networks for unsupervised and reinforcement learning.

Prerequisite: CSC311H1/​​ CSC411H1/​ STA314H1/​ ECE421H1/​ ROB313H1/​ CSCC11H3; MAT235Y1/​​ MAT237Y1/​​ MAT257Y1/​ MAT291H1/​ MAT294H1/​ AER210H1/​ MAT232H5/ MAT233H5/ MATB41H3; MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1/​ MAT185H1/​ MAT188H1/​ MAT223H5/ MATA23H3
Exclusion: CSC321H1/​CSC421H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC419H1 - Geometry Processing

Hours: 24L/12T

Extending traditional signal processing, geometry processing interprets three-dimensional curves and surfaces as signals. Just as audio and image signal data can be filtered, denoised and decomposed spectrally, so can the geometry of a three-dimensional curve or surface. The course covers algorithms and mathematics behind fundamental operations for interpreting and manipulating geometric data. These essential tools enable: geometric modeling for computer aided design, life-like animations for computer graphics, reliable physical simulations, and robust scene representations for computer vision. Topics include: discrete curves and surfaces, curvature computation, surface reconstruction from point clouds, surface smoothing and denoising, parameterization, symmetry detection, and animation.

Prerequisite: MAT235Y1/​ MAT237Y1/​ MAT257Y1/​ MAT291H1/​ MAT294H1; MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1/​ MAT185H1/​ MAT188H1; CSC209H1/​ proficiency in C or C++/ APS105H1/​ ESC180H1/​ CSC180H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC317H1/​ CSC418H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC420H1 - Introduction to Image Understanding

Hours: 24L/12P

Introduction to basic concepts in computer vision. Extraction of image features at multiple scales. Robust estimation of model parameters. Multiview geometry and reconstruction. Image motion estimation and tracking. Object recognition. Topics in scene understanding as time permits.

Prerequisite: CSC263H1/​ CSC265H1/​ ECE345H1/​ ECE358H1/​ MIE335H1; (MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1/​ (MAT186H1, MAT187H1)/ (MAT194H1, MAT195H1)/ (ESC194H1, ESC195H1); MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1/​ MAT185H1/​ MAT188H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC320H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC428H1 - Human-Computer Interaction

Hours: 24L/12T

Understanding human behaviour as it applies to user interfaces: work activity analysis, observational techniques, questionnaire administration, and unobtrusive measures. Operating parameters of the human cognitive system, task analysis and cognitive modelling techniques and their application to designing interfaces. Interface representations and prototyping tools. Cognitive walkthroughs, usability studies and verbal protocol analysis. Case studies of specific user interfaces.

Prerequisite: CSC318H1; STA237H1/​ STA247H1/​ ​STA255H1/​ ​STA257H1/​ ECE302H1/​ STA286H1/​ CHE223H1/​ CME263H1/​ MIE231H1/​ MIE236H1/​ MSE238H1/​ ECE286H1; CSC209H1/​​ proficiency in C or C++ or Java/ APS105H1/​ ESC180H1/​ CSC180H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: A course in PSY; CSC209H1; (STA248H1/​STA250H1/​STA261H1)/(PSY201H1, PSY202H1)/(SOC202H1, SOC300H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC436H1 - Numerical Algorithms

Hours: 24L/12T

Numerical algorithms for the algebraic eigenvalue problem, approximation, integration, and the solution of ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on the convergence, stability, and efficiency properties of the algorithms.

Prerequisite: CSC336H1/​CSC350H1
Exclusion: CSC351H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC438H1 - Computability and Logic

Hours: 24L/12T

Computable functions, Church's thesis, unsolvable problems, recursively enumerable sets. Predicate calculus, including the completeness, compactness, and Lowenheim-Skolem theorems. Formal theories and the Gödel Incompleteness Theorem. Ordinarily offered in years alternating with CSC448H1.

Prerequisite: (CSC363H1/​CSC463H1)/CSC365H1/​CSC373H1/​CSC375H1/​MAT247H1
Exclusion: MAT309H1; PHL348H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC443H1 - Database System Technology

Hours: 24L/12T

Implementation of database management systems. Storage management, indexing, query processing, concurrency control, transaction management. Database systems on parallel and distributed architectures. Modern database applications: data mining, data warehousing, OLAP, data on the web. Object-oriented and object-relational databases.

Prerequisite: CSC343H1, CSC369H1, CSC373H1/​CSC375H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC446H1 - Computational Methods for Partial Differential Equations

Hours: 24L/12T

Finite Difference and Finite Element methods for boundary value problems including 2-point boundary value problems and 2-dimensional problems. Convergence of methods. Efficiency of the solution of linear systems. Finite difference methods for initial value problems. Consistency, stability and convergence. Method of lines. Special topics of interest among domain decomposition, multigrid, FFT solvers. Ordinarily offered in years alternating with CSC466H1.

Prerequisite: CSC351H1/​(CSC336H1 (75%))/equivalent mathematical background; MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1; APM346H1/​MAT351Y1/​(MAT244H1/​MAT267H1 and exposure to PDEs)
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC448H1 - Formal Languages and Automata

Hours: 24L/12T

Regular, deterministic, context free, context sensitive, and recursively enumerable languages via generative grammars and corresponding automata (finite state machines, push down machines, and Turing machines). Topics include complexity bounds for recognition, language decision problems and operations on languages. Ordinarily offered in years alternating with CSC438H1.

Prerequisite: CSC236H1/​CSC240H1, CSC263H1/​CSC265H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC373H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC454H1 - The Business of Software

Hours: 24L/12T

The software and internet industries; principles of operation for successful software enterprises; innovation and entrepreneurship; software business definition and planning; business models, market and product planning; product development, marketing, sales, and support; financial management and financing of high-technology ventures; management, leadership, and partnerships. Students will all write business plans in teams.

Prerequisite: Five CSC half-courses at the 200-level or higher
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC456H1 - High-Performance Scientific Computing

Hours: 24L/12T

Computationally-intensive applications in science and engineering are implemented on the fastest computers available, today composed of many processors operating in parallel. Parallel computer architectures; implementation of numerical algorithms on parallel architectures; performance evaluation. Topics from: matrix-vector product, solution of linear systems, sparse matrices, iterative methods, domain decomposition, Fourier solvers. For students in computer science, applied mathematics, science, engineering. Ordinarily offered in years alternating with CSC446H1.

Prerequisite: CSC436H1/​(CSC336H1 (75%))/equivalent mathematical background; CSC209H1/​proficiency in C, C++, or Fortran
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC458H1 - Computer Networking Systems

Hours: 24L/12T

Computer networks with an emphasis on network systems, network programming, and applications. Networking basics: layering, routing, congestion control, and the global Internet. Network systems design and programming: Internet design, socket programming, and packet switching system fundamentals. Additional topics include network security, multimedia, software-defined networking, peer-to-peer networking, and online social networks.

Prerequisite: CSC209H1, CSC258H1, CSC263H1/​CSC265H1, STA247H1/​STA255H1/​STA257H1/​STA237H1/​ECO227Y1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC463H1 - Computational Complexity and Computability

Hours: 24L/12P

Introduction to the theory of computability: Turing machines and other models of computation, Church’s thesis, computable and noncomputable functions, recursive and recursively enumerable sets, many-one reductions. Introduction to complexity theory: P, NP, polynomial time reducibility, NP-completeness, self-reducibility, space complexity (L, NL, PSPACE and completeness for those classes), hierarchy theorems, and provably intractable problems.

Prerequisite: CSC236H1/​CSC240H1
Exclusion: CSC363H1/​CSCC63H3, CSC365H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC465H1 - Formal Methods in Software Design

Hours: 24L/12T

Using mathematics to write error-free programs. Proving each refinement; identifying errors as they are made. Program development to meet specifications; modifications that preserve correctness. Useful for all programming; essential for programs that lives depend on. Basic logic, formal specifications, refinement. Conditional, sequential, parallel, interaction, probabilistic programming, and functional programming.

Prerequisite: CSC236H1/​CSC240H1/​MAT309H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC466H1 - Numerical Methods for Optimization Problems

Hours: 36L

Numerical methods for unconstrained optimization problems, in particular line search methods and trust region methods. Topics include steepest descent, Newton's method, quasi-Newton methods, conjugate gradient methods and techniques for large problems. This course will normally be offered every other year.

Prerequisite: CSC336H1, MAT221H1/​MAT223H1/​MAT240H1, MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC469H1 - Operating Systems Design and Implementation

Hours: 24L/12T

An in-depth exploration of the major components of operating systems with an emphasis on the techniques, algorithms, and structures used to implement these components in modern systems. Project-based study of process management, scheduling, memory management, file systems, and networking is used to build insight into the intricacies of a large concurrent system.

Prerequisite: CSC369H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC473H1 - Advanced Algorithm Design

Hours: 24L/12P

Advanced algorithm design techniques, with emphasis on the role that geometry, approximation, randomization, and parallelism play in modern algorithms. Examples will be drawn from linear programming and basics of continuous optimization; randomized algorithms for string matching, graph problems, and number theory problems; streaming algorithms and parallel algorithms in the Map-Reduce model.

Prerequisite: CSC373H1, MAT221H1/​MAT223H1/​MAT240H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC485H1 - Computational Linguistics

Hours: 36L

Computational linguistics and the processing of language by computer. Topics include: context-free grammars; chart parsing, statistical parsing; semantics and semantic interpretation; ambiguity resolution techniques; reference resolution. Emphasis on statistical learning methods for lexical, syntactic, and semantic knowledge.

Prerequisite: CSC209H1/​ APS105H1/​ APS106H1/​ ESC180H1/​ CSC180H1; STA237H1/​ STA247H1/​​ STA255H1/​ ​STA257H1/​ ECE302H1/​ STA286H1/​ CHE223H1/​ CME263H1/​ MIE231H1/​ MIE236H1/​ MSE238H1/​ ECE286H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC324H1/​CSC384H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC486H1 - Knowledge Representation and Reasoning

Hours: 24L/12T

Representing knowledge symbolically in a form suitable for automated reasoning, and associated reasoning methods. Topics from: first-order logic, entailment, the resolution method, Horn clauses, procedural representations, production systems, description logics, inheritance networks, defaults and probabilities, tractable reasoning, abductive explanation, the representation of action, planning.

Prerequisite: CSC384H1, CSC363H1/​CSC365H1/​CSC373H1/​CSC375H1/​CSC463H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC488H1 - Compilers and Interpreters

Hours: 24L/12T

The structure of compilers, Programming language processing. Scanning based on regular expressions, Parsing using context free grammars, Semantic analysis (type and usage checking), Compiler dictionaries and tables. Runtime organization and storage allocation, code generation, optimization. Use of modern compiler building tools. Course project involves building a complete compiler.

Prerequisite: CSC258H1, CSC324H1, CSC263H1/​CSC265H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC490H1 - Capstone Design Project

Hours: 48L

This half-course gives students experience solving a substantial problem that may span several areas of Computer Science. Students will define the scope of the problem, develop a solution plan, produce a working implementation, and present their work using written, oral, and (if suitable) video reports. Class time will focus on the project, but may include some lectures. The class will be small and highly interactive. Project themes change each year. Contact the Computer Science Undergraduate Office for information about this year’s topic themes, required preparation, and course enrolment procedures. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC491H1 - Capstone Design Project

Hours: 48L

This half-course gives students experience solving a substantial problem that may span several areas of Computer Science. Students will define the scope of the problem, develop a solution plan, produce a working implementation, and present their work using written, oral, and (if suitable) video reports. Class time will focus on the project, but may include some lectures. The class will be small and highly interactive. Project themes change each year. Contact the Computer Science Undergraduate Office for information about this year’s topic themes, required preparation, and course enrolment procedures. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC494H1 - Computer Science Project

Hours:

This half-course involves a significant project in any area of Computer Science. The project may be undertaken individually or in small groups. The course is offered by arrangement with a Computer Science faculty member. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Three 300-/400-level CSC half-courses, and permission of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Contact the Computer Science Undergraduate Office for information about course enrolment procedures.
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC495H1 - Computer Science Project

Hours:

This half-course involves a significant project in any area of Computer Science. The project may be undertaken individually or in small groups. The course is offered by arrangement with a Computer Science faculty member. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Three 300-/400-level CSC half-courses, and permission of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies. Contact the Computer Science Undergraduate Office for information about course enrolment procedures.
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at FAS, UTM, or UTSC, or the Data Science Specialist at FAS, are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

DRM101Y1 - Introduction to Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 48L/24T

The course introduces students to key concepts and issues in the three related disciplines at the core of our program: drama, theatre, and performance studies. We consider broader questions of performance and performativity in daily life alongside the questions of what goes into the making of a stage-based performance and the responsibilities of artists, presenters, and witnesses in this endeavour. Engaging critically with theoretical and dramatic texts and live performances, students learn how to think about performance in its cultural, social, aesthetic and political dimensions, and how to acknowledge and navigate their own responsibilities as culture workers situated in specific historical and contemporary contexts. This course combines weekly two-hour lectures with one-hour tutorials.

Exclusion: DRM100Y1, DRE121H5, DRE122H5, VPDA10H3, VPDA11H3, VPDA10H3, VPDA15H3, VPDB10H3, VPDB11H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

DRM200Y1 - Performance I

Hours: 168P

Emphasis is initially placed on ensemble, non-verbal, and improvisational work. Students proceed to the application of their acquired skills to scripted material. Students may apply in their first or second year of University. The Application Deadline is March 10th for the first round of auditions; August 10th for the second round. Please consult the CDTPS undergraduate web page for information on how to apply.

Prerequisite: An audition and interview in April or in August. Newly admitted students can apply for an audition before beginning their first year of studies.
Corequisite: DRM101Y1 or DRM220Y1
Exclusion: DRS221H5 AND DRS222H5; VPDB01H3 AND VPDB02H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM202H1 - Directing I

Hours: 36P

A practical introduction to directing theatre and to the different styles, concerns, and goals that can guide directors in their relations to actors, audiences, and politics. Through lectures, discussions, and practical exercises, students learn how directors prepare for their work in terms of generating ideas, breaking down a text, animating space, and communicating with actors and audiences.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; DRM101Y1
Corequisite: DRM220Y1
Exclusion: VPDC02H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM220Y1 - Comparative Theatre Histories

Hours: 48L/24T

This course will introduce students to major developments in world theatre history through the exploration of a wide range of plays, performances, and practices. In the Fall term our trajectory will go roughly from antiquity to the 16th Century; in the Winter term, from the 16th Century to the present. We will examine material from Africa, America, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, with close attention to the social, religious, historical, aesthetic, and political parameters in which theatre and performance take place. Nurturing ethnically sensitive approaches to world theatre history, this course considers the many ways theatre and performance interact with the globalized world. Students will have an opportunity to participate in collaborative projects and focus on writing for research in the performing arts.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

DRM228H1 - Playwriting I

Hours: 36L

A hands-on study of the craft of dramatic writing. The class examines the basic elements of playwriting such as plot, structure, theme, character, dialogue, setting, with an emphasis on story-making. Attention is given to the development of students own work through written assignments and in-class exercises.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; DRM101Y1
Corequisite: DRM220Y1
Exclusion: DRE362H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM254H1 - Design and Production I

Hours: 36L/12T

A practical and theoretical introduction to the fundamentals of theatrical performance design. This course touches on theatre architecture, conceptual approaches to theatrical design and spatial considerations of live performance. Students will work on case studies and practical projects geared toward understanding theatre terminology, design, and production processes. Students will also explore concrete aspects of technical theatre production, particularly as they pertain to theatrical design elements.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama
Corequisite: DRM101Y1 or DRM220Y1
Exclusion: DRM254Y1, VPDB03H3/VPDC03H3
Recommended Preparation: DRM101Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM286H1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36P

An introduction to selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies.Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution and Group assignment depending on the course content. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM300Y1 - Performance II

Hours: 192P

Building upon the work of DRM200Y1, students concentrate on scene study, styles of acting, and the development of ensemble work with an intensive focus on voice and movement practices. The Application Deadline is March 10th.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1 and DRM200Y1
Corequisite: DRM220Y1 or any course from Group A if DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1 is complete
Exclusion: DRS321H5 and DRS322H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM301H1 - Voice and Movement I

Hours: 3T/36P

A practice-based exploration of voice and movement in relation to performance. Through an exploration of the connections between breath, movement, voice, impulse, emotion, space, character and text, students learn to use their voice and body in informed and efficient ways in practice and performance and to develop a wide expressive range. Emphasis is placed on both personal awareness and ensemble work. Taken in conjunction with DRM300Y1: Performance II.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 and DRM200Y1
Corequisite: DRM300Y1
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM302H1 - Directing II

Hours: 12T/36P

A continuation of DRM202H1, concentrating on deepening the exploration of what it means to think and work like a director. Through practical exercises and scene study, students learn how to conceptualize a production and how to communicate their vision, as well as deepen their understanding of what is involved in directing actors and collaborating with a production team. Please consult the CDTPS undergraduate web page for information on how to apply and the deadline to apply.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1; DRM202H1; and an interview in November.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1 or any course from Group A.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1 and DRM331H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM303H1 - Theories of Acting

Hours: 36L

An examination of the major writers who have influenced the art of the actor in the twentieth century, with a focus on theories of actor training and the preparation for performance, the ways in which audiences assess acting as an art form, and the rise of the actor as an artist of equal status in North American and European theatre. Writers include Konstantin Stanislavsky, his followers and interpreters in America (including the Actors Studio and Lee Strasberg), along with alternatives to his 'System,' including Expressionism, Epic Theatre and the teachings of Michael Chekhov.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Exclusion: DRM388H1; VPDB15H3
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM311H1 - Voice and Movement II

Hours: 3T/36P

Building on DRM301H1, students deepen their exploration of vocal and physical practices and techniques. Taken in conjunction with DRM300Y1: Performance II.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 and DRM200Y1
Corequisite: DRM300Y1
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM328H1 - Playwriting II

Hours: 36L

A continuation of DRM228H1, concentrating on the in-depth knowledge and practice of playwriting with an emphasis on style and technique of writing for the stage. Students develop their own work through written assignments, in-class exercises, and the final public presentation. Please consult the CDTPS undergraduate web page for information on how to apply and the deadline to apply.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1; DRM228H1; and a portfolio of writing samples due in April.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1 or any course from Group A
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM331H1 - Dramaturgy

Hours: 36L

Study of dramaturgical theory and of interpretations of the dramaturge's function in the theatre. Using examples from Canada and beyond, students apply this knowledge to theatre practice.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1
Exclusion: DRE348H5; DRE360H5; VPDD01H3
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM342H1 - The Contemporary Avant-Garde

Hours: 36L

The turn of the 21st century advanced a social, political, and aesthetic shift reminiscent of that during the post-Industrial Revolution/pre-WWII epoch that launched the historical avant-garde. This class, while exploring significant artistic and sociopolitical developments of the historical avant-garde, will primarily concentrate on the experimental theatre and performance of the past 15 years—a contemporary avant-garde that “hinge[s] on a networked spatiality, rather than on linear teleology” and reflects a growing collective investment on part of audiences and artists alike in the work of a work of art.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM354H1 - Design II

Hours: 72P

An intermediate-level investigation of various aspects of theatrical performance design, with a focus on scenic and costume design, though also considering the impact of projections and lighting. Using skills developed through practical study in the Design Studio, the students form the core of the design team for Drama productions. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1; DRM254H1; and an interview.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1 or any course from Group A
Exclusion: DRM354Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM355Y1 - Production II

Hours: 72L/72P

An intermediate-level investigation of various aspects of theatrical production, including stage management, lighting, sound and video, with some exploration of how these elements relate to theatrical design concepts. Using skills developed through practical study in the Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse, the students form the core of the production team for Drama productions. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1; DRM254H1; and an interview.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1 or any course from Group A
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM362H1 - Theatre and the World

Hours: 36L

An intercultural, post-colonial and comparative analysis of innovative processes in the national and cross-cultural theatre around the world. Focusing on selected periods and cultures, the course explores the cultural backgrounds of key turning points in pre-modern and modern theatre and their impact on the developments of the post-modern theatre in a globalizing world.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM363H1 - Story-ing the Possible: Talking Treaties, Rehearsing (Re) conciliation

Hours: 24L/12T

This half course offers a comprehensive examination of Indigenous history in the territories (now called Canada), Treaty Relationships, and Indigenous-Settler Relationships, as they have shifted and evolved since first contact. Students will enter into conversation with this history and the contemporary issues confronting all Canadians today through the writings of Indigenous playwrights, oral history keepers, academic historians, and Indigenous theorists.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Exclusion: INS201Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

DRM366H1 - Canadian Theatre

Hours: 36L

Since the 1960s, actors, directors, and writers have been architects of Canadian identity. This course will study the history of Canadian theatre, with an emphasis on how Canadian playwrights and creators have been engaged with social and political issues. A survey of post-colonial theatre, cultural diversity, and gender politics on the Canadian stage.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Exclusion: DRM268H1; DRE200H5; DRE364H5; VPDB13H3
Recommended Preparation: For Drama Majors and Specialists: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

DRM368H1 - Devised Theatre

Hours: 36P

An in-depth study of devising theatre in a group context. This course offers an intensive exploration of the history and practice of devised theatre within the late 20th and early 21st centuries that will culminate in a number of in-class and public performances.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1 and DRM200Y1/​DRM202H1/​DRM228H1/​DRM254H1
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM375H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1; DRM200Y1/​DRM202H1/​DRM228H1/​DRM254H1
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM375Y1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 72P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1; DRM200Y1/​DRM202H1/​DRM228H1/​DRM254H1
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM376H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1; DRM200Y1/​DRM202H1/​DRM228H1/​DRM254H1
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM377H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1; DRM200Y1/​DRM202H1/​DRM228H1/​DRM254H1
Corequisite: .
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM378H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM101Y1; DRM200Y1/​DRM202H1/​DRM228H1/​DRM254H1
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM385H1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM385Y1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours:

An in-depth examination of selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies. Content may vary depending on instructor and is counted towards Group A. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM386H1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM387H1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM388H1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM101Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM400H1 - Advanced Performance

Hours: 12T/48P

Advanced Performance builds on the training sequence of DRM200Y1 and DRM300Y1 by developing students’ acting and performance skills in monologues, extensive collaborative scene work, and preparations for auditions. The work focuses on the particulars of character development and the emotional and technical aspects of the actor’s craft. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1
Corequisite: DRM403Y1 or permission of the Centre
Exclusion: DRM400Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM402H1 - Advanced Directing

Hours: 36T/36P

An exploration of advanced directing for the theatre. The class is centered on student directed productions, which are publicly presented at the end of term. Emphasis is placed on the development of strong central concepts and realizing the production with imagination, collaboration and creativity. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1; DRM302H1; DRM331H1; a written proposal and an interview in April.
Recommended Preparation: DRM300Y1/​DRM328H1/​DRM354H1/​DRM355Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM403Y1 - Mainstage Performance

Hours: 72T/144P

This course, taught each year by a different visiting professional theatre director, offers upper-level theatre and performance studies students the opportunity to explore acting in a full-length production. Plays are selected to challenge students in a variety of diverse ways, exposing them to a full spectrum of theatre and performance genres and possibilities. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1, 0.5 FCE from DRM368H1/​DRM375H1/​DRM376H1/​DRM377H1/​DRM378H1.
Corequisite: DRM400H1 and DRM413H1
Exclusion: DRS425H5 AND DRS426H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM413H1 - Advanced Voice and Movement

Hours: 12T/48P

Voice and Movement is a skill-developing companion to the DRM400H1 training for performers. It exposes students to a wide range of voice and movement techniques and explores a heightened use of physicality, voice and speech.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1
Corequisite: DRM403Y1 or permission of the Centre
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM454H1 - Advanced Design

Hours: 36L/36P

An advanced-level exploration of theatrical design skills and techniques, delving deeper into specific areas of specialization and with more opportunity for independent work. Students are expected to participate in Drama Centre productions in senior creative and leadership roles. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1; DRM354H1/​DRM354Y1; and an interview.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM455H1 - Advanced Production

Hours: 36L/36P

An advanced-level exploration of production skills and techniques, delving deeper into specific areas of specialization and with more opportunity for independent work. Students are expected to participate in Drama Centre productions in senior creative and leadership roles. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM355Y1; and an interview.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM485H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1; and an interview.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM485Y1 - Senior Seminar: Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies Thesis

Hours: 72L

Research thesis, emphasizing topics and methods used in drama, theatre and performance studies. Students must obtain permission from the instructor by submitting a research project proposal. The project may engage creative practice, but the thesis itself will be a critical, written work engaging the research and dramaturgy involved in the performance or artwork. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Deadline is March 10th to apply. See online application for details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1; and an interview.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

DRM486H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM487H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM488H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; DRM220Y1/​DRM230Y1.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS120Y1 - Modern Standard Japanese I

Hours: 48L/48T

This course is for students with no or a very limited background in Japanese. Students must go through screening process conducted by the Department. See www.eas.utoronto.ca/languages/japanese/ for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: EAS121H1, EAS122Y0, LGGA80H3, LGGA81H3
Recommended Preparation: Learning the Japanese alphabets (hiragana & katakana)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS122Y0 - Summer Japanese in Japan I

Hours:

This course is available in the Summer Abroad Program for students with no or a very limited background in Japanese. Those who successfully complete this course may be able to take EAS220Y1 based on the result of the East Asian Studies Department's placement test. See https://summerabroad.utoronto.ca/ for details.

Exclusion: EAS120Y1, EAS121H1
Recommended Preparation: Learning the Japanese alphabets (hiragana & katakana)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS340H1 - Chinese Society and Culture

Hours: 24L

This course explores issues of identity, self, and community in a broad exploration of cultural transformation in China.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS340Y1
Recommended Preparation: EAS103H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS347H1 - Everyday Life in Modern Japan

Hours: 24L

This course analyzes the history of modern Japan from the perspective of a “critique everyday life” (la vie quotidienne; nichijō seikatsu). Analyzing the uneven transformation of Japan’s feudal society into a capitalist commodity economy, the course discusses how everyday life in Japan was produced and reproduced in ways that are specific to capitalist society, but that also open onto questions of a revolution of everyday life, an everyday life after capitalism. Focusing on different moments in Japan’s modern history (including its past colonial empire), the course looks at, reads, and listens to diverse representations of everyday life in Japan, especially in the worlds of work and labour, consumption and social reproduction. How are these worlds represented politically, as well as aesthetically? Specific topics include: literature and music, architecture and housing, war and forced labour, population control and sexual reproduction, and radio, leisure-time, and state propaganda.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS247H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS393H1 - Chinese Buddhism

Hours: 24L

Topics vary according to the instructor’s interests.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS395Y0 - Topics in East Asian Studies (Summer Abroad)

Hours:

This course allows students to pursue the specialized study of topics tailored to the research and study opportunities available in Hong Kong and the expertise and interests of the instructor. Available only in the Woodsworth College Hong Kong Summer Program.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS396H1 - Special Topics in East Asian Studies

Hours: 24L

A study of Chinese, Japanese or Korean culture, history and/or literature. Content depends on the instructor. When offered, the course will have a subtitle that describes its content.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS418H1 - Chinese Art Theories

Hours: 24S

This course focuses on theories of Chinese arts by critically analyzing various theoretical texts and treatises on music, painting, calligraphy, and literature as recorded in the Classics.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1
Recommended Preparation: Knowledge of Chinese language
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS431H1 - Advanced Seminar in Japanese Cinema

Hours: 24S

The focus ranges from the examination of cross-cultural theoretical problems (such as Orientalism) to a director-based focus, from the examination of genre (such as documentary or the category of genre itself) to the way film intersects with other cultural forms and technologies (such as video and new media).

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS242H1/​EAS243H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS454H1 - Modern Chinese Historiography

Hours: 24S

A selective survey of major historiographical problems and debates in the fields of late 19th and 20th century Chinese history. Course readings will include both theoretical and historical materials.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS209H1,HIS280Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS457H1 - Modern Japanese Historiography

Hours: 24S

An analysis of contemporary monographs on modern Japanese history. This course offers a critical survey of existing methodologies of and approaches to writing about modern Japan.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS247H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS473H1 - Modern Korean Historiography

Hours: 24S

An examination of recent literature in the modern Korean history field, focusing especially on the late 19th and 20th centuries.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS271H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS489H1 - Advanced Seminar in Asian Media Studies

Hours: 24S

Topics include: histories of media infrastructures, material culture, geopolitics of colonialism, imperialism, and regionalism, institutional histories of media production, analyses of popular and industrial media practices, questions of interface, platforms, circulation, and reception, and the constitutive role of media in shaping notions of modernity, publicity, and politics.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS496H1 - Advanced Topics in East Asian Studies

Hours: 24S

An in-depth study of Chinese, Japanese or Korean culture, history and/or literature. Content depends on the instructor. When offered, the course will have a subtitle that describes its content.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

ECO105Y1 - Principles of Economics for Non-Specialists

Hours: 48L/24T

Fundamentals for consumers, businesses, citizens. Microeconomics focuses on cost/benefit analysis: gains from trade, price coordination, competition/monopoly, efficiency/equity tradeoffs, government/market failures, environmental policies, income/wealth distributions. Macroeconomics focuses on: GDP growth, unemployment, inflation, monetary/fiscal policies, business cycles, exchange rates, government deficits/debt, globalization. Emphasizes economic literacy, fewer mathematical tools than ECO101H1, ECO102H1.

Exclusion: ECO100Y1, ECO101H1, ECO102H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO197H1 - Seminar on Classical Economic Thought

Hours: 24L/12T

This seminar examines the basic ideas of the five most notable economic thinkers before 1870: Aristotle, Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, and Karl Marx. We focus on demand as the basis of price in Aristotle; the ambiguity in Smith between a labour theory of value and a demand/supply theory of value; the principle of population in Malthus; Ricardo’s labour theory of value and his theory of rent and economic growth; and Marx’s labour theory of value as the explanation for the development of capital. The understanding in these authors of economics as an historical process of production gives fascinating insights into modern economic development that contrast with the modern economic concentration on the distribution of resources in a world of scarcity. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO198H1 - Seminar on Modern Economic Thought

Hours: 24L/12T

This seminar examines the development of modern economic thought from the marginal revolutionaries (Jevons and Menger) who proclaimed that demand in the form of utility was the basis of price to the supply/demand analysis of Alfred Marshall that established modern microeconomics by 1890. We then look at Irving Fisher’s 1907 foundation of the modern concept of the interest rate and the present value of capital before reviewing J.M. Keynes’ 1936 criticism of neo-classical positions on full employment and interest rates in arguing for government manipulation of interest rates to ensure full employment. We finish with Milton Friedman’s championing of the unregulated market economy through his quantity theory of money critique of Keynes. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO199H1 - Economics and Sustainable, Green Development

Hours: 24L/12T

Economic growth has been a powerful force through history in improving living standards throughout the world. At the same time, there is a growing recognition that environmental damages frequently accompany this growth, whether it be at the local level (soil degradation and deforestation), or the global level (climate change). Economics studies the allocation of scarce resources, but how can it incorporate "the environment" in a meaningful way that can help guide policy-makers in the 21st century? This course is a fast review of economic approaches and tools, and a review of a wide range of environmental policies, designed to manage the possible adverse impacts of economic expansions. The major emphasis in this course is on the market-based policies that guarantee incentive compatibility of these policies, thus, a higher chance of success. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO204Y1 - Microeconomic Theory and Applications (for Commerce)

Hours: 48L/24T

The use of microeconomics to analyze a variety of issues from marketing and finance to organizational structure. Consumer preferences and behaviour; demand, cost analysis and estimation; allocation of inputs, pricing and firm behaviour under perfect and imperfect competition; game theory and public policy, including competition policy. Business cases are used to connect theory and practice and to highlight differences and similarities between economics and accounting, marketing and finance. This course is restricted to students in the Commerce programs.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(67%)/(ECO101H1(63%), ECO102H1(63%))/ECO105Y1(80%); MAT133Y1/​(MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT137Y1/​MAT157Y1
Exclusion: ECO200Y1, ECO206Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO206Y1 - Microeconomic Theory

Hours: 48L/24T

This course deals more rigorously and more mathematically with the topics included in ECO200Y1 and is intended primarily for students in certain Economics Specialist programs.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(70%)/(ECO101H1(70%), ECO102H1(70%)); MAT133Y1(63%)/(MAT135H1(60%), MAT136H1(60%))/MAT137Y1(55%)/MAT157Y1(55%)
Exclusion: ECO200Y1, ECO204Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO208Y1 - Macroeconomic Theory

Hours: 48L/24T

This course deals more rigorously and more mathematically with the topics included in ECO202Y1 and is intended primarily for students in certain Economics Specialist programs.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(70%)/(ECO101H1(70%), ECO102H1(70%)); MAT133Y1(63%)/(MAT135H1(60%), MAT136H1(60%))/MAT137Y1(55%)/MAT157Y1(55%)
Exclusion: ECO202Y1, ECO209Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO210H1 - Mathematical Methods for Economic Theory

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to mathematical methods commonly used in economic theory. Topics include: multivariate calculus, concavity and convexity, unconstrained multivariate optimization, multivariate optimization subject to equality or inequality constraints and differential equations.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(67%)/(ECO101H1(63%), ECO102H1(63%))/ECO105Y1(80%); MAT133Y1(63%)/(MAT135H1(60%), MAT136H1(60%))/ MAT137Y1(55%)/MAT157Y1(55%)
Corequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1
Exclusion: MAT235Y1, MAT237Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ECO220Y1 - Introduction to Data Analysis and Applied Econometrics

Hours: 48L/48T

Numerical and graphical data description; data collection and sampling; probability; sampling distributions; statistical inference; hypothesis testing and estimation; simple and multiple regression analysis (extensive coverage). Learn how to analyze data and how to correctly interpret and explain results. Use Excel to analyze a wide variety of data and replicate tables and figures in economics research papers.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(67%)/(ECO101H1(63%), ECO102H1(63%))/ECO105Y1(80%); MAT133Y1/​(MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT137Y1/​MAT157Y1
Exclusion: GGR270H1, PSY201H1, PSY202H1, SOC202H1, SOC252H1, STA220H1, STA221H1, STA248H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3); The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ECO227Y1 - Foundations of Econometrics

Hours: 48L/24T

A rigorous introduction to probability and mathematical statistics intended for students in Economics Specialist programs. Probability and estimation theory, sampling distributions, hypotheses testing, multiple regression analysis. Students will learn the tools used in economics and finance to model and address randomness and uncertainty.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(70%)/(ECO101H1(70%), ECO102H1(70%)); MAT133Y1(63%)/(MAT135H1(60%), MAT136H1(60%))/MAT137Y1(55%)/MAT157Y1(55%)
Corequisite: Recommended: MAT223H1/​MAT240H1, MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​ECO210H1
Exclusion: STA237H1, STA238H1, STA247H1, STA248H1, STA255H1, STA257H1, STA261H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ECO305H1 - Economics of Accounting

Hours: 24L/12T

The economic impact of accounting rules and practices for firms and financial contracts. Topics include: economic models of agency, economics of optimal accounting rules such as government regulation of corporate disclosure and the economic returns to financial reporting. No previous knowledge of accounting is required; the basic language of financial accounting will be covered.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: Not open to students enrolled in Rotman Commerce programs.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO306H1 - American Economic History

Hours: 24L/12T

A survey of American economic history from the ante-bellum period to the present. Potential topics include: the rapid growth of the American economy in the late 19th and early 20th century; causes of the onset of the Great Depression; the economic impact of slavery and its aftermath; health and demographic trends; and 20th century trends in inequality.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO310H1 - Empirical Industrial Organization

Hours: 24L/12T

The quantitative analysis of firms' strategies in real-world industries, using tools from applied microeconomics and statistics. Topics include: studies of monopoly, oligopoly, imperfect competition, and the estimation of demand and cost functions that underpin these markets.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO313H1 - Environmental Economics and Policies

Hours: 24L/12T

This course demonstrates how a rigorous application of microeconomic techniques can inform our responses to various environmental problems. Topics may include: air and water pollution and renewable resource management.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO314H1 - Energy and the Environment

Hours: 24L/12T

This course surveys important features of energy markets and related environmental challenges. One of the central objectives is to provide an understanding of the key economic tools needed to analyse these markets. A related objective is the development of a framework for understanding the public discourse on energy and the environment. Topics include: the hydrocarbon economy (oil, natural gas and coal), electricity markets, global warming and other externalities, renewable energy, conservation, carbon taxes and ‘cap-and-trade’.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO316H1 - Applied Game Theory

Hours: 24L/12T

Focuses on the core ideas and concepts of game theory and on applications of them in economics and other social sciences. Topics may include: oligopoly, electoral competition, the theory of public goods, voting theory, the free rider problem, repeated interaction, bargaining, evolutionary equilibrium, matching and auctions.

Note: This course cannot be taken as a substitute in programs that require ECO326H1.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1
Exclusion: ECO326H1, ECO326H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO320H1 - Economic Analysis of Law

Hours: 24L/12T

The practical application of microeconomic theory to common legal problems: torts, contracts, property and crime, and the limitations of economic analysis. No previous familiarity with the law is assumed. (This is an economic analysis of legal issues, not a course in law).

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO321H1 - Canadian Economic History prior to 1850

Hours: 24L/12T

This course applies the tools of economics - theoretical and empirical - to study Canada's historical growth experiences. Topics include: the variation in well-being among Indigenous peoples (both pre and post contact), migration and indentured servitude, colonial money, child labour and education, and the rise of factories. The impact of colonial institutions on Canada’s economic success is studied in a comparative context.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1
Exclusion: ECO322Y5, ECO323Y5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO322H1 - Canadian Economic History, 1850-1960

Hours: 24L/12T

Canadian economic history between 1850 and 1960, with a focus on the debate over the ability of the market mechanism to optimize economic development. Topics covered include: tariff policies, Confederation, the transcontinental railroad, opening the West, the Great Depression, monetary policy and the Bank of Canada, regional growth and dominion-provincial relations.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1
Exclusion: ECO322Y5, ECO323Y5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO324H1 - Economic Development

Hours: 24L/12T

This course critically analyzes issues related to economic development and the associated policy responses. Tools from micro and macroeconomic theory are employed, as well as the critical assessment of empirical evidence. Topics may include: education, health, credit markets, inequality, and the role of foreign aid.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO324Y1, ECO324Y5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO325H1 - Advanced Economic Theory - Macro

Hours: 24L/12T

A development of the microeconomic foundations of macroeconomic theory to expand students' analytic skills by constructing and solving macroeconomic models. Topics may include: dynamic choice, neoclassical growth theory, uncertainty and rational expectations, business cycles, as well as fiscal and monetary policy.

Prerequisite: ECO208Y1/​ECO202Y1(70%)/ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1(70%)/ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1(70%), STA238H1(70%))/ (STA247H1(70%), STA248H1(70%))/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Recommended Preparation: MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​ECO210H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO326H1 - Advanced Microeconomics - Game Theory

Hours: 24L/12T

Game theory and applications. Topics include: strategic and extensive games, with applications to economics.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1(70%)/ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1(70%)/ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1(70%), STA238H1(70%))/ (STA247H1(70%), STA248H1(70%))/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO316H1, ECO326H5
Recommended Preparation: MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​ECO210H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO331H1 - Behavioural and Experimental Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Ample empirical and experimental evidence suggests significant departures from classical assumptions of economic behaviour. For example, humans are neither always perfectly rational nor always self interested. This course describes systematic ways in which behaviour deviates from neoclassical assumptions, generating new, and hopefully more realistic behavioural assumptions that have broad empirical, theoretical and policy implications.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO332H1 - Economics of the Family

Hours: 24L/24T

A use of microeconomics to study the behaviour of the family, including marriage, divorce, intra-family allocations, investment in children and gender roles.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO334H1 - The Political Economy of Media

Hours: 24L/12T

Tools are developed to analyze voters and the role of information in democracies. Theories of voter information are evaluated using empirical literature on media and the political economy of media. The effects of innovations in information technology are explored and we will evaluate how the empirical results square with the theory. A study of newspapers, radio, television, cable, the Internet and social media, with a focus on empirical methods used to identify effects of media on voters.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO336H1 - Public Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Theory of taxation and public goods, and quantitative methods for program evaluation. Additional topics include: taxation and income distribution; environmental policy; and the political economy of government policy.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO336Y1, ECO337H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO337H1 - Public Economics (for Commerce)

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to the economics of government similar to ECO336H1, but with greater focus on issues in business and financial economics. Additional topics include: business tax planning and corporate financial policy; taxation of saving and risk-taking; and government business enterprises.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO336Y1, ECO336H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO338H1 - Economics of Careers

Hours: 24L/12T

The economic analysis of careers from the perspectives of both workers and employers. How do people decide what to study, what careers to pursue, and when to change jobs? How do these decisions interact with the structure of firms? The impact of specialization and the division of labour on the evolution of careers is considered, as are the role of cognitive and communication skills in the labour market.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO339H1 - Labour Economics: Employment, Wages and Public Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

Using tools from microeconomic theory and statistics, this course introduces students to the study of labour markets, focusing on employment and wage determination, and the application of labour economics to public policy. Topics may include: labour supply, labour demand, estimating the impact of welfare programs, minimum wages, and other labour market interventions.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO339Y1, ECO343H5, ECO344H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO340H1 - Labour Economics: The Distribution of Earnings

Hours: 24L/12T

Using tools from microeconomic theory and statistics, this course studies the determinants of wages across labour markets. Topics include: the theory of compensating differentials, human capital, discrimination, immigration, unions, and alternative models of compensation. In addition, students are introduced to microeconomic models of unemployment. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on the evaluation of empirical evidence.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO339Y1, ECO343H5, ECO344H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO349H1 - Money, Banking and Financial Markets

Hours: 24L/12T

This course studies the interaction of the monetary and banking sectors with financial markets and the broader economy. It builds especially on tools developed in intermediate macroeconomics, but also focuses on the institutional structure of the Canadian monetary sector, including the role and operation of the Bank of Canada.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO348H5/ECO349H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO351H1 - Special Topics in Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Courses may be offered in one or more subjects each year. Students must meet the prerequisites announced by the Department (see the Undergraduate Administrator or the Economics Department website for details).

Prerequisite: TBA
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO358H1 - Financial Economics I

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to economics of financial assets and financial markets. Topics: inter-temporal choice, expected utility theory, security valuation, selected asset pricing models, market efficiency, and the term structure of interest rates - essential materials for an understanding of the role and operation of financial markets.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ACT349H1,RSM332H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO362H1 - Economic Growth

Hours: 24L/12T

The course considers a broad range of issues that underlie economic growth, including technical progress and the accumulation of human and physical capital. Beyond these factors, the course also investigates the efficiency with which capital is used, the role of foreign trade, and the possible roles of institutions and geography.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO362H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO364H1 - International Trade Theory

Hours: 24L/12T

An examination of the causes and consequences of international trade. The first half develops traditional models of comparative advantage. The second half examines more recent theoretical and empirical work on trade & wages, the political economy of trade, outsourcing, and firm heterogeneity.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO230Y1, ECO231H1, ECO232H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO365H1 - International Monetary Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to open economy macroeconomics and international finance. The core objective of the course is to develop macroeconomic models of open economies that can be applied towards gaining an understanding of recent events such as US deficits, financial crises, China's exchange rate policy and the Euro.

Prerequisite: ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1
Exclusion: ECO230Y1, ECO231H1, ECO232H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO368H1 - Economics of Conflict

Hours: 24L/12T

This course explores the links between violent conflict and socioeconomic development. It focuses on micro-level processes leading to conflict, and how conflict and political violence affect people's lives at the household and community levels. It also examines how these processes are linked to wider political and economic issues including governance and the role of institutions. Tools from economic theory are applied alongside country-specific and cross-country empirical evidence.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1). Note: Students with ECO100Y1(67%)/(ECO101H1(63%), ECO102H1(63%))/ECO105Y1(80%), plus a full-year of quantitative methods/statistics (e.g., POL222H1, POL232H1), and who are enrolled in the International Relations or Peace, Conflict and Justice Major or Specialist programs may take this course with Permission of the Instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO369H1 - Health Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

The provision of health care provides many special problems of informational asymmetry, regulation, insurance and redistribution. A consideration of the demand and supply side problems. Alternative reform proposals for health care are explored.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO372H1 - Data Analysis and Applied Econometrics in Practice

Hours: 24L/12T

How multiple regression can be used to answer causal questions. Implications of, and how to interpret different model specifications and identification strategies. Students will read, critically evaluate and replicate existing research, and conduct their own original analyses. Statistical software STATA or R will be used.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO351H1 (Special Topics in Economics: Applied Regression Analysis and Empirical Papers), offered in Fall 2016 and Winter 2017.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO374H1 - Forecasting and Time Series Econometrics

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to econometrics similar to ECO375H1, with greater focus on applications drawn from business and financial economics. The course is built around the statistical foundations and economic applications of the multiple regression model. Using statistical software, students will also learn how to conduct, present, and critique empirical research.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1(70%)/ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1(70%), STA238H1(70%))/ (STA247H1(70%), STA248H1(70%))/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Recommended Preparation: MAT221H1/​MAT223H1/​MAT240H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO375H1 - Applied Econometrics I

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to econometrics. Statistical foundations and the interpretation of multiple regression models, with an emphasis on cross-sectional data. Application of regressions to a wide variety of economic questions and data sources, including the use of statistical software. Problems in the identification of causality, and an introduction to methods of addressing common statistical issues.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1(70%)/ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1(70%), STA238H1(70%))/ (STA247H1(70%), STA248H1(70%))/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO327Y5, ECO375H5
Recommended Preparation: MAT221H1/​MAT223H1/​MAT240H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO380H1 - Markets, Competition, and Strategy

Hours: 24L/12T

This course in applied microeconomics is concerned with the functioning of markets and the behaviour of firms within these markets. The focus is on strategic relationships between organizations, including competitive relationships among firms in the same market and cooperative relationships between a firm and its suppliers and distributors.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO381H1 - Personnel Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

An examination of selected material on compensation and incentives in organizations. Topics include: recruitment and hiring, training, turnover, downsizing, motivating workers, teams, allocating authority and task assignment.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO370Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO401H1 - Topics in Economic Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

This course covers basic issues in the theoretical and empirical evaluation of public policy. Sample topics include: income redistribution through taxation and the provision of social insurance and public goods, the mitigation of externalities, and welfare analysis in behavioural models.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO402H1 - Topics in Health Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

This course explores a variety of topics in health economics, providing students with an overview of current and historical institutional characteristics of the market for, and public policy towards, health care. Students will apply theoretical and empirical tools to current domestic and international issues in health policy. No previous background in health economics is required.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO403H1 - Topics in Development Economics and Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

This course covers a variety of topics pertaining to economic development and associated policies. Depending on the course instructor, the focus may be on theories and policies related to poverty alleviation, human capital formation, financial markets, international trade, governance or economic growth.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO404H1 - Topics in Managerial Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Applies quantitative economic methods to real world business-oriented cases. Sample topics include: new product design, decision making under uncertainty, market segmentation and price discrimination, inventory analysis, game theoretic analysis of price wars, financial portfolio design, and optimal pricing. Involves substantial modeling in Excel, regression analysis, optimization methods, and financial reports.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1(75%)/ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO372H1/​ECO374H1/​ECO375H1; at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO406H1 - Developmental Macroeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

This course studies a growth model applicable to both middle-income developing countries and resource-rich developed countries. Special attention is paid to causes of cyclical currency overvaluation, particularly Dutch disease and excessive capital inflows.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO407H1 - Competing Views in Macroeconomic Theory and Policy

Hours: 24L/24T

Provides students with a systematic analysis of competing perspectives on key areas of macroeconomic theory and policy. Special attention paid to competing views regarding key fiscal, monetary, and trade policy issues as applied to Canada.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO409H1 - Topics in Money, Banking, and Finance

Hours: 24L/12T

This course examines the foundations of money and financial institutions using tools mastered in micro and macroeconomics. The goal is a set of principles valid for the analysis of monetary policy and institutional regulation in a variety of real world settings.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO410H1 - Mergers and Competition Policy

Hours: 24L/24T

A combined theoretical, empirical and policy approach to mergers amongst competitors (horizontal mergers). Uses microeconomic models including game theory and econometrics. Delves into recent/current matters assessed by antitrust authorities domestically and/or internationally with applications to specific industries.

Prerequisite: ECO372H1/​ECO374H1/​ECO375H1; at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO414H1 - Energy and Regulation

Hours: 24L/12T

This course provides a general treatment of the economics of energy markets and the use of regulation in addressing environmental and other issues arising in these markets. A central theme is the search for an appropriate balance between market forces and regulatory/government intervention. Familiarity with tools of microeconomics and statistics/econometrics is essential. Topics include: oil, natural gas, coal and electricity markets, global warming and other externalities, networks, feed-in-tariffs, carbon taxes, ‘cap-and-trade’ and incentive regulation.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO417H1 - Economic Development Policy: Community Engaged Learning

Hours: 12L/12T/12P

An examination of the causes and consequence of poverty in developing countries with a microeconomic focus, and how it relates it to poverty in the developed world, using a 30-hour service placement at a community organization. Importance of community and context specific factors in policy implementation; learn how local organizations have responded. Use of reflection assignments, papers, group work and class discussions to relate to course concepts. Topics include: poverty traps, health, education, and credit. An application to the instructor is necessary. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO419H1 - International Macroeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

This course studies the causes and consequences of international borrowing and lending and exchange rate fluctuations. We will discuss key empirical facts about these phenomena, develop economic models to understand the forces that drive them, and apply the models to gain insights about a variety of historical contexts like China's rapid economic development and the recent sovereign debt crises in the Eurozone periphery.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO420Y1 - Special Topics in Economics

Hours: 48S

Seminars or workshops may be offered in one or more subjects each year. Students must meet the prerequisites announced by the Department (see the Undergraduate Administrator or the Economics Department website for details).

Prerequisite: TBA
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO421H1 - Special Topics in Economics

Hours: 24S

Seminars or workshops may be offered in one or more subjects each year. Students must meet the prerequisites announced by the Department (see the Undergraduate Administrator or the Economics Department website for details).

Prerequisite: TBA
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO422H1 - Special Topics in Economics

Hours: 24S

Seminars or workshops may be offered in one or more subjects each year. Students must meet the prerequisites announced by the Department (see the Undergraduate Administrator or the Economics Department website for details).

Prerequisite: TBA
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO423H1 - Economics and Biosocial Data

Hours: 24L/12T

This course introduces and critically assesses economic research that uses genetic, neuroscientific, and other biosocial data. We will address questions such as: what are the effects of brain neurochemistry on economic decision-making? What role do nature and nurture play in economic behaviour and outcomes? What can we learn from genoeconomics? What are the policy implications (or lack thereof) of related findings? No previous background in biology or genetics is required.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Exclusion: ECO422H1 (Special Topics in Economics: Biology, Genetics and Economics), offered in Winter 2017.
Recommended Preparation: ECO372H1/​ECO374H1/​ECO375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO425H1 - Business Cycles

Hours: 24L/12T

This course builds on material covered in ECO208Y1. Students will learn how to use business cycle models to better understand key empirical features of the macroeconomy. Topics covered include: the financial crisis, monetary policy, fiscal policy, theories of unemployment, and the effects of innovation on economic fluctuations, the Great Depression and the Financial Crisis.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Corequisite: ECO374H1/​ECO375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO426H1 - Market Design

Hours: 24L/12T

This course presents the theory and practice of market design, including matching markets and auctions. Sample topics include: school choice, kidney exchange, spectrum auctions, and keyword auctions.

Prerequisite: ECO316H1(70%)/ECO326H1(60%)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO427H1 - Economics of Information

Previous Course Number: ECO421H1

Hours: 24L/12T

This course examines the role and the use of information in strategic situations. The class will expand on the material covered in game theory classes and illustrate it with applications. Topics include: communication, signalling, building reputations, adverse selection, etc.

Prerequisite: ECO316H1(60%)/ECO326H1
Exclusion: ECO421H1 (Special Topics in Economics: Economics of Information), offered in Winter 2018 and Winter 2020.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO434H1 - Topics in Political Economy

Hours: 24L/12T

This course surveys recent advances in political economy, emphasizing the critical evaluation of empirical evidence pertaining to political economic theories. Topics vary by year, but may include: voters and electoral competition, and the political economy of media and political agency.

Prerequisite: ECO316H1/​ECO326H1; ECO374H1/​ECO375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO435H1 - The Economics of Modern China

Hours: 24L/12T

A focus on post-1949 Chinese economy, and the PRCs economic legacy. Economic development during the Maoist period, particularly post-1979 reforms. China's experience is compared to Eastern Europe's and the role of China in the rapidly growing East Asian economy. This is a limited enrolment seminar requiring extensive reading.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1(70%)/ECO204Y1(70%)/ECO206Y1(70%); ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO437H1 - Quantitative Macroeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

In order to capture the complexity of economic behaviour and interactions, especially with a significant time dimension, modern models of the macroeconomy make considerable use of computer simulation. This course teaches students both how to develop the economic models, and how to solve and work with them computationally.

Prerequisite: ECO325H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO438H1 - Topics in Behavioural Economics

Previous Course Number: ECO422H1

Hours: 24L/12T

Behavioural Economics is a relatively new field that incorporates insights gained from psychological, experimental and neuroscientific studies. Research methods adapted from behavioural economics are now being employed in virtually every field in economics. The course will cover the main themes in behavioural economics: individual choices under risk and uncertainty, reference-dependent choices, intertemporal preferences, other-regarding preferences, bounded rationality in individual and interactive decision-making, and the measurement of rationality and recovery of preferences.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​​ECO204Y1/​​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Exclusion: ECO422H1 (Special Topics in Economics: Topics in Behavioural Economics), offered in Winter 2018, Winter 2019, and Winter 2020.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO446H1 - Advanced Public Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Advanced topics in public economics and economic analysis of Canadian public policy. Through a mix of lectures and independent research, students will acquire theoretical and empirical tools for public policy analysis. Topics may include: income inequality and redistribution; fiscal federalism; taxation of corporate profits; and policies to deal with public goods and externalities.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 FCE in ECO at the 300+ level.
Exclusion: ECO336Y1
Recommended Preparation: ECO372H1/​ECO374H1/​ECO375H1 (familiarity with STATA)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO451H1 - Macroeconomic Growth

Hours: 24L/12T

Studies current empirical evidence, and corresponding theoretical models to explain and understand macroeconomic growth, and its varied experience across countries. Coverage and depth of treatment go beyond ECO362H1. Students may benefit from, but need not have taken ECO362H1.

Prerequisite: ECO325H1(60%); ECO374H1(60%)/ECO375H1(60%)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO462H1 - Financial Econometrics

Hours: 24L/12T

This course is intended primarily for students in the Financial Economics specialist program. An introduction to the econometrics used in empirical finance, with an emphasis on estimation and inference using computer based applications. Topics will include: parametric and nonparametric models of volatility, evaluation of asset pricing theories, and models for risk management and transactions data.

Prerequisite: ECO358H1(70%); ECO375H1(70%)/ ECO375H5(70%)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO463H1 - Financial Market Innovation

Hours: 24L/12T

A research-oriented course that explores the impact of technological developments on the industrial organization of financial markets. Topics include: the impact of the automated financial products and procedures (e.g., algorithmic trading and robo-advising) on the price formation process, the economic impact of new tools and technologies (e.g., blockchain, digital currencies, and predictive analytics such as machine learning), the emergence of alternative financing methods such as crowdfunding and peer-to-peer lending.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1(70%)/ECO204Y1(60%)/ECO206Y1(60%); ECO374H1(70%)/ECO375H1(70%)/CSC321H1/​CSC411H1
Exclusion: ECO463H5
Recommended Preparation: ECO358H1/​RSM330H1/​RSM332H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO464H1 - Empirical Financial Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

The course develops the tools used in empirical research in financial economics. Coverage may include: discrete choice models, duration models, instrumental variables, differences-in-differences, regression discontinuity, propensity score estimators, sample selection models and cumulative abnormal return calculation. Topics are drawn from: ownership structure, mergers and acquisitions, capital structure, payout policy, CEOs’ effect on the firm, executive compensation, insider trading, shareholder activism, and bank financing.

Prerequisite: ECO358H1(70%)/ RSM332H1(70%); ECO374H1(70%)/ ECO375H1(70%)/ ECO375H5(70%)/ ECO327Y5(70%)
Recommended Preparation: ECO359H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO465H1 - International Finance

Hours: 24L/12T

An advanced course that addresses topics in international finance and macroeconomics. Potential topics include: foreign exchange market; exchange rate determination; empirical models of exchange rates; international financial markets and uncertainty; international CAPM and home bias; sovereign debt; optimal capital controls.

Prerequisite: One of the following: ECO365H1(80%)/(ECO325H1(60%), ECO374H1(60%))/(ECO325H1(60%), ECO375H1(60%))
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO466H1 - Empirical Macroeconomics and Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

This course builds on material covered in ECO208Y1, ECO325H1, and ECO374H1/ECO375H1. Students will increase their data literacy and learn to apply techniques to address policy issues. Topics covered: how monetary policy is conducted, ways in which central banks use general equilibrium models and basic techniques for predicting key macroeconomic variables. Students will follow current global issues and forecast how domestic and international events may alter the Bank of Canada's monetary policy in the short run.

Prerequisite: ECO208Y1(70%)/ ECO209Y1(70%)/ ECO202Y1(75%)/ ECO325H1(70%); ECO374H1(70%)/ ECO375H1(70%)
Recommended Preparation: ECO325H1, ECO425H1, ECO475H1
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO499H1 - Honours Essay in Applied Microeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

Students will complete an original research paper on a topic of their choosing. Topic must be microeconomic and applied, meaning all papers will involve data and quantitative (regression) analysis.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ECO208Y1/​ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ (STA237H1, STA238H1)/ (STA247H1, STA248H1)/ (STA257H1, STA261H1); ECO372H1/​ECO374H1/​ECO375H1; 3.0 GPA in economics courses; approval of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate.
Recommended Preparation: ECO374H1/​ECO375H1 and ECO372H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EEB322H1 - Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology

Hours: 24L/36P

A broad introduction to animal behaviour emphasizing concepts from ethology and behavioural ecology, including foraging, predation, mating systems, parental care and behaviour genetics. Field and laboratory studies are undertaken. (Lab Materials Fee: $25; Lab Manual Fee: $10)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1; and a course in statistics from EEB225H1 (recommended), PSY201H1, STA220H1/​STA250H1/​STA257H1/​STA288H1, GGR270H1, HMB325H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB384H1 - Diversity of Amphibians and Reptiles

Hours: 24L/36P

Lectures and laboratories examine the natural history, morphology, behaviour, ecology, evolutionary relationships, and biogeography of amphibians (frogs and toads, salamanders, caecilians) and non-avian reptiles (turtles, the tuatara, lizards, snakes, and crocodilians). Ancillary fee of $25 to cover cost of arranging a live animal lab featuring living Ontario reptiles and amphibians. Students are also required to purchase a $25 lab manual.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB462H1 - Phylogenetic Systematics

Hours: 24L/36P

The Tree of Life metaphor for evolutionary relationships among species, phylogenies, is now fundamental in biology. Phylogenetic trees are now used both in species classification and to investigate myriad biological hypotheses about the evolutionary process and applied problems like virus and cancer epidemiology. This course will train students in the concepts and core methods of phylogenetic tree inference, including parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian techniques. Students will gain bioinformatics skills with application to DNA sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree inference. Through a combination of lectures, discussion, and computer labs, students will master theory and practice of phylogenetic tree construction and inference.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, EEB225H1/​STA220H1/​STA247H1/​STA248H1/​STA261H1/​STA288H1/​GGR270H1/​PSY201H1
Exclusion: BIO443H5
Recommended Preparation: CSC108H1, EEB323H1, EEB362H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

EEB488H1 - Research Issues in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Hours: 42S

This course is taken concurrently by students who are enrolled in EEB498Y1 Advanced Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and uses a combination of seminars, discussions, and presentations (including presentations by students) designed to cover issues commonly encountered when conducting research in ecology and evolutionary biology. Topics may include experimental design, effective use of statistics, scientific writing and publishing, public communication, ethics, and career development. Students will be required to attend weekly departmental seminars. This half-course runs from September to April and lectures meet in alternate weeks.

Prerequisite: Permission of the department
Corequisite: EEB498Y1
Exclusion: EEB499Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB495H1 - Seminar in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Hours: 24S

Seminar course in ecology and evolutionary biology, emphasizing critical thinking and the synthesis of ideas crossing disciplinary boundaries. Group discussions among peers, facilitated by faculty, and student presentations. Discussions include critical analysis of research and review articles in the primary literature. Evaluation based on presentations, participation in class discussions, and written assignments. (Note students may take this course only once.)

Prerequisite: A minimum of 1.0 FCE in EEB courses at the 300+ level (at least 0.5 FCE in ecology and 0.5 FCE in evolutionary biology is highly recommended)
Exclusion: EEB491H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENG100H1 - Effective Writing

Hours: 36L

Practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing, and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course may not be counted toward any English program.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG198H1 - Monster Encounters: Monsters and the Monstrous in Literature

Hours: 24S

Monsters and the monstrous have been among the most compelling and frequently recurring elements in literature, from ancient times to the present day. From Homer's Cyclops to Ridley Scott's alien, monstrous figures have terrified and transfixed all those who come upon them. In this course, we will examine the figure of the monster to see what we might gain from our own encounter with the monstrous. Readings will include epic poems, novels, and critical selections from the burgeoning field of inquiry known as "monster studies." Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: ENG196H1, ENG197H1, ENG199H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG199H1 - "Tell It Slant": Mental Illness and Literature

Hours: 24S

This course will explore representations of mental illness in poetry, short fiction and essays from the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will consider the relationship of literature to "madness," "hysteria" and "melancholia" and work to historically and politically contextualize some of our contemporary dilemmas regarding psychic distress. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: ENG196H1, ENG197H1, ENG198H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENV223H1 - Fundamental Environmental Skills

Hours: 24L

The practical, interdisciplinary and controversial nature of environmental issues, as well as the uncertainty that surrounds measures to address them demand mastery of a particular range of skills by environmental students. This course teaches the fundamental research, analysis and presentation skills required for effective environmental work. This course is for students enrolled in the Environmental Studies Major program, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.

Prerequisite: 4 FCE of courses completed.
Exclusion: GGR271H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ENV316H1 - Laboratory and Field Methods in Environmental Science

Hours: 12T/36P

This course focuses on methods of sampling and analyzing natural air, water and solid Earth materials for physical, chemical and biological properties that are relevant to current environmental issues. It will integrate approaches from chemistry, physics, geology and biology, and cover techniques in field sampling, laboratory analyses and analyses of large environmental data sets. Basic concepts related to quality control will be emphasized throughout the course: sample collection and storage methods, calibration of field and lab instruments, analyses in complex matrices, errors (accuracy, precision), and detection limits. This course is for students enrolled in the Environmental Science Major program, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director. A fee of $25 will be charged for lab supplies, lab instrument charges and technical services.

Prerequisite: ENV234H1, ENV237H1/​ENV238H1, one of CHM210H1/​ESS262H1, one of STA220H1/​STA288H1/​EEB225H1/​GGR270H1
Exclusion: ESS425H1/​ENV315H1 (Chemical Analysis of Environmental Samples)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV334H1 - Environmental Biology: Applied Ecology

Hours: 36L/12T

Applied issues in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, with an emphasis on land-use change and its impacts on watersheds. Topics include: ecology of agro-ecosystems and other human-managed ecosystems, bio-indicators of anthropogenic impacts, ecosystem restoration, and adaptive management. Group projects address local management/restoration issues.

Prerequisite: ENV234H1 and completion of 9 FCEs
Recommended Preparation: a course in statistics (EEB225H1 recommended)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV335H1 - Environmental Design

Hours: 18L/18P

Environmental design, in the context of this course, refers to design strategies that account for the ability of supporting ecosystems to continue to meet human needs and those of other lifeforms without diminishing biological diversity or environmental quality. This course takes a hands-on approach to investigating several environmental design issues: climate-responsive design, energy consumption, health and comfort, natural lighting and ventilation, and water management. Students will build up a design of a net-zero carbon residential building through several instructive design exercises during the semester, including hands-on measurement and calculation activities.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV381H1 - Special Topics in Environment

Hours: 24L

Special topics course designed for students in School of the Environment programs. Topics vary based on the year offered. See the School of the Environment website for more details.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 9.0 FCEs to register for the course.
Exclusion: BIG102Y1 if ENV381H1 taken in 2015-16 or 2016-17
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV382H1 - Special Topics in Environment

Hours: 24L

Special topics course designed for students in School of the Environment programs. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See School of the Environment website for more details.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 9.0 FCEs to register for the course.
Exclusion: BIG101Y1 if ENV382H1 taken in 2015-16 or 2016-17
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ENV421H1 - Environmental Research

Hours: 24S

A research course for all students in the School combining report writing, independent and group-based research on an interdisciplinary topic. This course is restricted to students enrolled in one of the Environmental Studies Major, Environmental Ethics Major, Environment & Health Specialist, Environmental Chemistry Specialist or Environment & Toxicology Specialist programs, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 10.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ENV222H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV451H1 - Current Environmental Topics

Hours: 24S

This capstone course for the School’s core programs will explore current environmental topics, with the goal of integrating the multi- and interdisciplinary strands of each student's learning to date. This course is for students enrolled in one of the School's BA programs, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ENV222H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV452H1 - Environmental Science Seminar

Hours: 36S

Scientists from within and external to the university share and discuss challenges, findings and opportunities. Specific topics (and speakers) vary from year to year but may draw from rehabilitation techniques, contaminants in our environment, environmental health, impacts on landscapes and communities, biodiversity, water, and modelling of environmental processes. This course is for students enrolled in the School of the Environment, Environmental Science Major BSc program, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12 FCE of courses, including ENV316H1/​ENV334H1/​ENV337H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV481H1 - Special Topics in the Environment

Hours: 24S

Special topics course designed for advanced Specialist and Major students in School of the Environment programs. This course is for students enrolled in a School Environmental program, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 10 FCE, including (ENV221H1,ENV222H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ENV482H1 - Special Topics in the Environment

Hours: 24S

Special topics course designed for advanced Specialist and Major students in School of the Environment programs. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a School Environmental program.

Prerequisite: (ENV221H1,ENV222H1) and completion of at least 10 FCE; or permission of Undergraduate Associate Director.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ENV492H1 - Independent Studies Project

Hours:

A research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a School of the Environment program. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 14.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ENV222H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ENV493H1 - Independent Studies Project

Hours:

A research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. This course is restricted to students enrolled in a School of the Environment program. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 14.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ENV222H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ESS205H1 - Confronting Global Change

Hours: 24L/8T

The emergence of society as a major geological force is considered in terms of the evolving debate about the consequences of human activity for the habitability of our planet. Major issues such as climate change, environmental pollution, and depletion of natural resources are examined.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 4.0 credits
Exclusion: GLG205H1, ERS321H5, ENV200H1, EEB208H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ESS223H1 - Earth System Chemistry 1: Earth Materials

Previous Course Number: ENV233H1

Hours: 24L/24T

This course introduces students to the basic principles of geochemistry beginning with some fundamental chemical concepts concerning atoms, bonding and the periodic table. It continues with an overview of the wide ranging geochemical fields and concepts such as elemental distributions, fractionation and differentiation, and trace element cycling. The latter half of the courses leads into an introduction to basic thermodynamics as it applies to more advanced geochemical concepts found in aqueous geochemistry, mineralogy and petrology.

Prerequisite: MAT135H1, MAT136H1, CHM135H1
Exclusion: ENV233H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS234H1 - Introduction to Geological Field Methods

Previous Course Number: ESS330H1

Hours:

A two-week field course in early May or late August. Students are introduced to field geology and to basic field measurement, mapping and documentation techniques (for example in the Espanola - Manitoulin Island area, west of Sudbury). Students are responsible for the cost of board and lodging and transport to and from the field area. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Note: Enrollment is handled by the department. For registration deadlines, additional fees associated with the field course, course dates, and special registration requirements, please consult the departmental announcements or inquire with ugrad@es.utoronto.ca.

Prerequisite: ESS224H1/​ESS222H1, ESS241H1, ESS262H1/​JEG100H1
Exclusion: ESS330H1, GLG340H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS262H1 - Earth System Processes

Hours: 24L/24P

An introduction to how our planet works, focusing on physical processes that govern the nature and composition of Earth with an emphasis on the dynamic nature of the planet. Topics include surface processes (e.g., weathering and erosion, ocean and atmospheric circulation, weather and climate), crustal processes (e.g., plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, biogeochemical cycles), and earth-environment interactions (e.g., natural hazards, resource development, and sustainability).

Recommended Preparation: PHY131H1/​CHM138H1/​BIO120H1. For Mineral Engineering students, recommended preparation is MAT186H1 and CHE112H1.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS322H1 - Igneous Petrology

Hours: 24L/36P

An overview of the nature and origin of igneous rocks, with particular emphasis on the interpretation of textures and mineral assemblages as they reflect rock-forming processes. Topics include the physical and chemical properties of magma, origin, and evolution of different magmatic series in specific igneous/tectonic environments, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of igneous rocks, and the assimilation, fractionation & crystallization processes.

Prerequisite: ESS224H1, ESS234H1, ESS321H1/​ESS221H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS331H1 - Sedimentation and Stratigraphy

Hours: 24L/36P

Formal principles of stratigraphy, types of stratigraphic unit, methods of dating and correlation (biostratigraphic methods, magnetostratigraphy, radiometric dating). Methods of study in surface and subsurface (outcrop measurement, elementary introduction to wireline logs, seismic methods). The principles of facies analysis; sediment transport - sedimentary structures, the flow regime, and sediment gravity flows. The carbonate factory and carbonate rock classification. Trace fossils. Laboratory exercises in understanding facies mapping, isopachs and isolith maps.

Prerequisite: ESS224H1
Exclusion: GLG360H1, ERS313H5
Recommended Preparation: ESS222H1, ESS234H1/​ESS330H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS423H1 - Mineral Deposits

Hours: 24L/36P

Geology and geochemistry of ore deposits. Origin and interpretation; systematic ore mineralogy, in hand specimen and reflected light microscopy.

Prerequisite: ESS322H1, ESS323H1
Exclusion: GLG442H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS441H1 - Advanced Structural Geology

Hours: 24L/24P

Principles of geological mechanics: stress, strain, rheology. Faulting, folding and development of tectonic foliations and lineations. Structural analysis of fractures, folds and tectonites.

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCE of ESS courses including ESS322H1, ESS234H1, ESS241H1, ESS331H1
Recommended Preparation: ESS345H1, ESS323H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS490H1 - Geological Capstone Fieldtrip

Hours:

A two-week excursion to a challenging field setting. Students will integrate field observations with their accumulated knowledge of geodynamics, structural geology, and landscape evolution to understand large-scale geological events. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. This course can be offered in any given term. Note: Enrollment is handled by the department. For registration deadlines, additional fees associated with the field course, course dates, and special registration requirements, please consult the departmental announcements or inquire with ugrad@es.utoronto.ca.

Prerequisite: At least 12 FCE of any Earth Science program of study requirements, or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: GLG420H1
Recommended Preparation: ESS221H1/​ESS224H1, ESS262H1, ESS222H1, ESS234H1, ESS331H1, ESS423H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

FAH102H1 - Art and Ideas

Hours: 24L/6T

A survey of the history of art, architecture and allied arts. This introduction to the history of art will examine a wide range of objects, selected and discussed in connection with a special theme to be selected by the instructor. Students will be expected to study the history and significance of art through the close reading of selected texts that relate to both art and theory. Special attention will be given to developing essential art historical skills necessary for upper level courses. The topic for each semester will vary based on the instructor. No previous knowledge of history of art or architecture is required. Frequent writing assignments and exercises will be based on readings, lectures, and museum or gallery visits to collections in Toronto.

Exclusion: FAH105H5/FAH202H5/VPHB39H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH484H1 - Fashion & Textiles: Culture & Consumption

Hours: 24S

This course examines the history, meaning and consumption of Western European fashion (18th - 21st centuries). Analysis and research will combine student seminars with the study of actual artefacts in the Textile & Costume Collection of the Royal Ontario Museum.

Prerequisite: 8 half FAH courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH494H1 - Independent Studies

Hours:

Eligible students may undertake an independent study course under the supervision of Department of Art History (St. George campus) faculty member. Refer to the Art History website for further information and application instructions. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH494Y1 - Independent Studies

Hours:

Eligible students may undertake an independent study course under the supervision of a Department of Art History (St. George campus) faculty member. Refer to the Art History website for detailed information and application instructions. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FCS199H1 - Marketing in the French Speaking World

Hours: 24S

This course investigates sociocultural and linguistic issues surrounding market expansion and marketing of products and services to French-speaking audiences in Canada and elsewhere. Students consider challenges posed by increased globalization through comparisons of English- and French-speaking communities, while exploring basic marketing theory. Through case studies of successes and failures, students examine how companies develop and adapt branding and messaging for Francophone audiences by integrating differences in humour, values, politics, and financial considerations. Students thus develop an understanding of the Francophone consumer and gain skills for advertising and branding in a Francophone or bilingual environment. This course is taught in English. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: None
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

FCS369Y0 - The Culture of Touraine

Hours: 48L

This course will offer a unique opportunity to study the culture of the Touraine region while living an experience of complete immersion in Tours, a city located in the Loire Valley, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the seat of power of the French monarchy until the 17th Century. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 5 course credits in any subject
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE246H1 - Introduction to French Literary Analysis

Previous Course Number: FRE241H1

Hours: 24L/12T

This course provides a general introduction to French and francophone literature of different genres and periods. Special emphasis will be placed on concepts, methods, and problems of literary analysis with the goal of helping students to improve their ability to write literary essays. Among the questions to be explored are: What are the rules and conventions of scholarly writing? How does one develop and structure arguments to ensure that a paper is well organized? How are rhetorical devices analyzed? When and how should bibliographical references be inserted?

Prerequisite: FRE245H1 and FSL221Y1 or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment, equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test.
Exclusion: FRE241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE304H1 - Contemporary French Women's Prose Fiction

Hours: 24L

An analysis of selected prose texts of the last hundred years written by major French women authors, emphasizing themes and textual strategies used to represent the female subject, her relationship to language, and the role of ethnicity, class, and gender in the construction of identity.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE310H1 - Relations between Text and Other Media

Hours: 24L

Literary texts and other forms of media (photographs, cinematographic images, paintings) have been associated in a fascinating relation in hundreds of works of French literature. An exploration of this inextricable weaving together of verbal and visual experiences as it pertains to literature through the study of interdisciplinary theoretical texts focused on photography, painting, and cinema.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE314H1 - Quebec and French-Canadian Literature

Hours: 24L

Literature of the 20th and 21st centuries speaks of contesting social and literary figures of authority, of challenging traditional literary structures, and of accentuating creativity and subjectivity. An exploration of the thematic and formal structures that challenge traditional forms of thinking and writing in contemporary literature from Québec and other French-speaking parts of Canada.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE 241H1/FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE318H1 - Medieval French Literature

Hours: 24L

Religious fervour, chivalry, romance and ribald humour, heroic deeds, marvellous adventures, and exotic travels as found in selected texts from the French Middle Ages. Readings in modern French translations with appropriate reference to the original language.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE319H1 - Laughter and Thought in French Renaissance Literature

Hours: 24L

An overview of the fascinating literary diversity, prose, theatre and poetry essential to the changing humanistic discourse of the French Renaissance and Baroque periods. The underscoring of important historical events - Reformation, Great Discoveries, Printing - to explain the philosophical and literary values produced by such violent times.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE320H1 - French Literature of Classicism and Enlightenment

Hours: 24L

An introduction to French literature between Classicism and the French Revolution with particular emphasis on its relationship to philosophical, cultural, and political movements of the Enlightenment, providing historical depth to philosophical and socio-political foundations of today's life. A privileged access to, and critique of, modernity in the postmodern age.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE324H1 - French Literature in the Time of Revolutions and Industrialization

Hours: 24L

The long 19th century (1789-1914) is characterized by change: from political upheavals to literary, scientific, and media revolutions, the spread of literacy, and the rapid development of industrialization and colonization. A study of the evolution of literature (genres, forms, movements), as influenced by these changing socio-political and economic contexts.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE326H1 - Contemporary French Literature

Hours: 24L

Characterized by experimentation and the crisis of representation, French literature of the 20th and 21st centuries has undergone numerous transformations in form, content, and generic boundaries. A study of these literary movements, trends, and transgressions in poetry, prose, and theatre.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE332H1 - Francophone Literatures

Hours: 24L

A comprehensive introduction to Francophone literatures and cultures, examining the linguistic, aesthetic, and discursive specificities as represented by authors of the Francophone world. Focus on the concepts of colonialism, representation, alienation, emigration, and nationalism.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE334H1 - Francophone Cinema

Hours: 24L

Through films from across the spectrum of the Francophone world, a study of the diversity of the French colonial empire as well as the different aesthetic, historical, and cultural effects of colonialism and post-independence experience on various cinematic representations.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE336H1 - Postcolonialism: Francophone Literatures

Hours: 24L

The fundamentals of postcolonial theories, with emphasis on how they relate to the Francophone world. The dialogue between fiction and theory, as well as the modalities of a coherent Francophone postcolonial identity in a global world.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE345H1 - Literary Genres

Hours: 24L

Survey of the main literary genres and analysis of their features, with in-depth study of two of the genres: narrative (epic poem, novel, short narrative), lyric poetry, drama (tragedy, comedy, farce, mystery play), essay. Readings of selected texts, chosen for their representative potential and their historical relevance.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE410H1 - Advanced Topics in Quebec Literature:

Hours: 24S

An advanced interdisciplinary research seminar devoted to specific issues of Québécois literature and culture. Focus on a literary genre, a particular subject matter, a literary movement, or based on a multidisciplinary approach to cinema, arts, and music. For more information, see https://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1, FRE345H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE438H1 - Advanced Topics in Francophone Literatures

Hours: 24S

An advanced seminar dedicated to specific issues of the Francophone literature and culture. Focusing on an author, a literary genre, or based on a multidisciplinary approach involving cinema, arts and music, each seminar reflects the professor’s current research. For more information, see https://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1, FRE345H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE441H1 - Advanced Topics in French Literature

Hours: 24S

An advanced, research-oriented seminar devoted to specific issues of French literature and culture. Focus on a literary genre, a particular subject or literary movement, or based on a multidisciplinary approach involving cinema, arts, and music. For more information, see https://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1, FRE345H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE443H1 - Advanced Topics: Authors

Hours: 24S

An advanced, research-oriented seminar devoted to questions concerning the authors practice, originality, and oeuvre. Production, performance and prominence, characteristic genres, religious and philosophical thought, theoretical reflection on literature, language, and belonging as aspects of the analysis of one single authors body of writing. For more information, see https://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1, FRE345H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE446H1 - Advanced Studies in Literary Theory

Hours: 24S

An advanced, research-oriented course devoted to specific issues in French literary theory. Focus on particular theoretical concepts, paradigms, schools, trends, movements or major thinkers. For more information, see https://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​FRE246H1, FRE345H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE483H1 - French in Context: Language, Culture, and Society

Hours: 24L

The course investigates the relation between language, society, and culture and studies various aspects of French and Francophone civilization, with particular focus on the development and integration of materials for use in the classroom including contemporary texts and audio-visual documents.

Prerequisite: FRE384H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE486H1 - Special Topics in French Linguistics

Previous Course Number: JFL477H1, JFL478H1

Hours: 12T/24S

An advanced course on a particular topic in the use, acquisition, history or synchronic analysis of French. Please see the French Department website https://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate for the description of the particular course in a given year

Prerequisite: Will vary depending upon year. Consult department website.
Exclusion: JFL478H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE487H1 - Advanced Topics in Bilingualism and L2 acquisition

Hours: 12T/24S

This course examines how adult learners acquire various aspects of French language (vocabulary, syntax and/or phonology). It also provides in-depth, practical training in methodological design and quantitative analysis culminating in students’ undertaking of individual experimental studies.

Prerequisite: FRE376H1 + FRE378H1 + FRE383H1 + FRE388H1/​JFG388H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE488H1 - Special Topics in Advanced Linguistics I

Hours: 12T/24S

An advanced seminar on a specific aspect of French linguistics. For more information, see https://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate.

Prerequisite: Varies according to particular course offering; consult the French Studies Undergraduate brochure (www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate) for exact prerequisites.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE489H1 - Special Topics in Advanced Linguistics II

Hours: 12T/24S

An advanced seminar on a specific aspect of French linguistics. For more information, see https://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate.

Prerequisite: Varies according to particular course offering; consult the French Studies Undergraduate brochure (www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate) for exact prerequisites
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FSL313H1 - French for the Workplace

Previous Course Number: FSL363H1

Hours: 36L

This course is designed to enhance students’ existing knowledge of French by giving them a theoretical as well as a practical foundation in the use of French language in the workplace. Special emphasis will be placed on the appropriate vocabulary used within the context of communication in the Francophone workplace. Students will learn how to communicate in a variety of professional contexts as well as how to distinguish between the formal and informal styles of French suitable for diverse situations in the workplace. This course also aims to help students acquire intercultural skills needed in the Francophone workplace.

The redesigned course will provide a hybrid alternative that delivers the same high quality content and high degree of interaction present in traditional in-class course delivery. The new format will consist of weekly one-hour online sessions and two-hour traditional in-class sessions. In this format, further preparation work and homework will continue to be carried on as in the traditional course, i.e. outside of the 3-hour class time.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 (63%) or, upon first FRE/FSL, enrolment equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test
Exclusion: FSL321Y1 and higher
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL415H1 - Business French

Hours: 36S

This course is designed to strengthen oral and written communication skills in French and develop intercultural competence for a variety of career paths including public relations, international development, federal and provincial government. Students will gain expertise in spoken and written French through in-class activities supported by multimedia: interviews, professional presentations, and debates. The course is not open to native French speakers.

Prerequisite: FSL321Y1, FSL315H1
Exclusion: FSL421Y1; not open to native speakers of French. According to our departmental enrollment guidelines, native speakers of French are excluded from all FSL courses with the exception of those needing to improve their written or oral skills who must request permission from the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies to enroll in FSL442H1 or FSL443H1. Such students will be asked to complete the Placement Test at the Department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

GER370H1 - German Business Culture 1

Hours: 36P

This course provides students with a working knowledge of German business culture that allows them to navigate the German workplace. The main focus is to deepen students’ knowledge of business concepts.

Note: This course is required for the minor program in Business German

Prerequisite: GER272H1/​GER300Y1/​GER301H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GGR101H1 - Histories of Environmental Change

Hours: 24L

The course will focus on the processes that drive environmental change and how past societies have responded to the constraints that these impose. The emphasis is on the current interglacial, the Holocene, and how increasing population and technology has affected human-environment interactions.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

GGR340H1 - Health Geography

Hours: 24L

An exploration of the aspects of health in which place or location matters. Particular attention will be paid to the role of environments (physical, social, etc.) in explaining differences in health between places, the structuring of health-related behaviour in place, and the development of health policy for places.

Prerequisite: GGR270H1, or the combination of STA220H1 and HST250H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's, including GGR223H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR493Y1 - Geography Professional Experience

Hours:

Undertake professional placement matching academic interests and career goals. Students meet regularly during the year in class to cover topics such as: reflective writing, project management, career planning, and the application of academic skills in professional contexts. Research project required that connects a topic related to placement with academic literatures. Normally, one day per week spent at placement site. For students in their final year of a Geography major or specialist program of study, or the GIS Minor. Satisfies program requirements based on placement. Space limited. Applications are reviewed in early spring. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 14.5 FCEs; must be enrolled in a GGR Major or Specialist, or GIS Minor; permission of instructor.

HIS245H1 - European Colonialism, 1700- 1965

Hours: 24L

This course will introduce students to the history of European colonialism. It will analyze the nature of colonial rule, the impact of empire on both colonies and metropoles, and delve into questions of power, gender and culture. It considers slavery and abolition, imperial networks, colonial capital, colonial competition, colonial cultures, the twilight of colonial rule, and a variety of settings.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS283Y1 - History of Southeast Asia: How the Lands Below the Winds Reshaped the World

Hours: 48L/20T

This course examines how the cultural, economic, religious, and social histories of "Southeast Asia" [Brunei, Cambodia, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), the Philippines, Thailand, & Vietnam] shaped the world as we see it today. Lectures will demonstrate how the millennia-long cultural and material exchanges Southeast Asians engaged via water across the Indian and Pacific Oceans and the lands across Eurasia affected the lives of its inhabitants and the proximal and distant regions with which it had contact. In Tutorials, students will be trained to read primary sources. Themes to be explored include economic exchange, colonialism and its impact, gender and sexual diversity, and religion and society.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS295Y1 - History of Africa

Hours: 48L/24T

An introduction to African history and the methodology of history more broadly, this course sets out to question how historians do history, examine differences in theories of knowledge, and explore the relationship between academic and cultural representations of the past. The course also draws on anthropology and related disciplines.

Exclusion: HIS381H1/​HIS382H1/​HIS295H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS304H1 - Topics in Middle East History

Hours: 24L

An in-depth examination of Middle East historical issues. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See History Website for more details.

Prerequisite: HIS108Y1/​HIS245H1/​HIS231H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS327H1 - Rome: The City in History

Hours: 24L

This course investigates the development of Rome from its mythical foundations, through the Empire, the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque to the modern city, illustrating the shift from the pagan to the papal city and its emergence as the capital of a united Italy after 1870 and a modern European metropolis.

Prerequisite: At least 1.0 credit European History course(s)
Exclusion: VIC348Y1 (offered in Fall/Winter 2012-2013, 2013-2014, 2014-2015 and 2015-2016) and VIC162H1 (offered in Fall 2016, Fall 2017 and Fall 2018)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS343H1 - History of Modern Intelligence

Hours: 24L

This course explores the rise of modern intelligence over the long 20th century, from Anglo-Russian imperial competition before World War I through to the post-9/11 era. Students will study the contribution of intelligence services to victories and defeats in war, peace, and the grey areas in between. The course will also examine the relationship between intelligence services and society.

Exclusion: HIS343Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS103Y1 or an equivalent introduction to modern international relations
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS346H1 - Rice, Sugar, and Spice in Southeast Asia: a History of Food in the Region

Hours: 24L

This course examines the importance of food products in the livelihoods of the inhabitants of Southeast and in the world economy. It traces the circulation of these products within the Southeast Asian region in the pre-modern period, into the spice trade of the early modern era, and the establishment of coffee and sugar plantations in the late colonial period, and the role of these exports in the contemporary global economy.

Recommended Preparation: 1.0 FCE Asian or European history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

HIS367Y0 - The City in Central Europe – Ideas, Culture, Revolutions and Renewal

Hours: 48L

The cities of Central Europe, and most notably those of the Habsburg Empire, were at the forefront of Europe’s cultural, artistic and intellectual development until the outbreak of the Second World War. Moreover, these cities remain living monuments to the achievements of European culture to the present day. These cities also represent some of the darker aspects of European history. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the history of Central Europe, the complex historical role of central European cities, their interaction with imperial and then national cultres, economies and societies, and their importance in creating modern nation states.

Offered in summer only as part of the Summer Abroad Program.

Prerequisite: 1 FCE in History
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS368H1 - Early Modern Britain, 1485-1660 (formerly HIS238H1)

Hours: 24L

Introduction to the political, social and religious history of early modern England, Scotland and Ireland. Particular attention will be paid to the history of the monarchy, the Protestant Reformation, gender issues and relations between different parts of the British Isles.

Recommended Preparation: EUR200Y1, HIS109Y1/​HIS243H1/​HIS244H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS372H1 - Topics in U.S. History

Hours: 24L

In-depth examination of selected periods or themes in U.S. history. Topic in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Exclusion: HIS372H5/HISD36H3
Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS377H1 - 20th-Century American Foreign Relations

Previous Course Number: HIS377Y1

Hours: 24L

A survey of the history of American foreign relations from 1898 to the present. Themes include imperial expansion and the uses of power; the relationship of business and government in U.S. foreign policy; and the role of culture and ideas in Americas relations with the world.

Exclusion: HIS377Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS388H1 - France Since 1830

Previous Course Number: HIS388Y1

Hours: 24L

A study of French society, politics and culture from the Paris Commune to the 1990s. Special attention is paid to watersheds like the Dreyfus Affair and the Vichy regime, to issues of regionalism/nationalism, cultural pluralism, women's rights, intellectual and cultural trends, and decolonization.

Prerequisite: EUR200Y1/​one course in HIS/FRE
Exclusion: HIS388Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS391Y1 - Black Freedom in the Atlantic World

Hours: 72L

Black writers and historical actors were at the vanguard of re-conceiving, implementing, and realizing much of the Enlightenment project of freedom. Africans and people of African descent significantly affected its meaning in the Atlantic world. The course sets out to explore this history as well as the contemporary practice of freedom.

Prerequisite: 1.0 FCE in African, European, Atlantic World history or permission of course instructor
Exclusion: HIS296Y1/​HIS371H5/HISC70H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS396H1 - The Progressive Era and Rise of Big Business in America

Hours: 24L

This course examines the rise of big business in America and its relationship to social and economic changes in United States in the so-called Progressive Era (roughly 1880-1920). We will focus on several themes: the evolution and characteristics of big business; rise of organized labor; evolution of business-government relations; social and economic reform movements; and the changing status of immigrants, African Americans, and women (both white and African-American). In short, we will be studying a pivotal moment in the transformation of modern American society.

Exclusion: HIS389H1 (Topics in History: Business and Society), offered in Fall 2016 and HIS372H1 (Topics in U.S. History: The Progressive Era and Rise of Big Business), offered in Winter 2018
Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS418H1 - Themes in Canadian Environmental History

Hours: 24S

Environmental historians study the reciprocal relationship between humans and nature over time. This course examines key themes in the history of Canada's environment. Possible topics include food, energy, pollution, cities, parks, and environmental movements. Specific themes vary by year, depending on the focus of the instructor. Strong emphasis is place on reading and research.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/​HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS435H1 - Themes in Toronto History

Hours: 24S

This course will examine aspects of Toronto’s history. It is not a general survey of Toronto history; instead, the course will normally revolve around a specific theme or group of themes. Specific themes vary by year, depending on the focus of the instructor. Strong emphasis will be placed on reading and research.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/​HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS465Y1 - Gender and International Relations

Hours: 48S

This seminar explores the use of gender as a category of analysis in the study of international relations. Topics include gendered imagery and language in foreign policymaking; beliefs about women’s relationship to war and peace; issues of gender, sexuality, and the military; gender and global governance; gender and the global economy; sexual violence; and contributions of feminist theory to international relations theory.

Exclusion: JHP440Y1
Recommended Preparation: 0.5 credit at the 300-level in HIS/POL/WGS
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HMB201H1 - Introduction to Fundamental Genetics and its Applications

Hours: 24L/12T

The course provides a comprehensive introduction to a variety of therapeutic approaches including gene therapy, CRISPR-based gene editing, epigenetic manipulations & regenerative medicine. This course consists of three parts: tools and techniques of gene & genome manipulations; medical, environmental and agricultural biotechnology applications; and ethical, legal and social aspects of modern biotechnology as it pertains to human health and wellbeing.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Recommended Preparation: HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB301H1 - Biotechnology

Hours: 24L/12T

Students gain an appreciation for how science, government and society drive the development of biotechnology products. Topics include stem cells and regenerative medicine, diagnostics, cancer therapy, biotechnology in the developing world, antibiotic alternatives, and patents.

Prerequisite: HMB265H1/​BIO260H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB342H1 - Epidemiology of Health & Disease

Hours: 24L/24T

This course engages students in the fundamental science of epidemiology applied to health and disease. After an introduction to various measures of health and disease, the scientific methods used to investigate, analyze, prevent and control health problems will be illustrated using social, biomedical and public health examples

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, BIO120H1, BIO130H1/​HST209H1
Exclusion: HST373H1
Recommended Preparation: STA288H1 or other statistics course
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

HMB402H1 - Topics in Translational Medicine

Hours: 18L/6S

The bridge between basic scientific research and clinical practice integrates fundamental knowledge about molecular/cellular mechanisms and clinical disorders to increase the potential for new medical treatments, therapies and interventions as well as understanding of disease processes. Specific topics vary from year to year and will be based on the instructor's area(s) of expertise.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, BCH210H1, BIO230H1/​BIO255H1, HMB302H1/​HMB321H1/​HMB322H1/​BCH311H1/​CSB349H1/​MGY311Y1/​PSL350H1, and HMB202H1/​HMB203H1/​HMB204H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ PSL350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB450H1 - Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Diseases

Hours: 24L/12T

Proper development of the human brain is essential for human health. This course will examine how neurodevelopment failures contribute to neurological disorders and diseases, such as epilepsy and autism. Current research from basic, translational, and clinical perspectives will be examined using case studies.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB200H1, HMB320H1/​ANA300Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB470H1 - Exercise and Sports Medicine

Hours: 22L/4S

This course considers the health benefits and risks of different forms of exercise, with a goal of understanding how people should exercise, and how much, depending on their athletic and health goals. It introduces elements of exercise science including the biomechanics of tissues and injuries to develop an understanding of how both the quantity and quality of movement and loading contribute to healthy training and/or injury. Some common injuries in sport such as knee injuries and concussions are used as examples of how various patterns of loading can cause injuries.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, PSL300H1, PSL301H1, HMB200H1/​HMB201H1/​HMB202H1/​HMB203H1/​HMB204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB490Y1 - Health in Community

Hours: 24L/24T

An experiential learning course exploring health-related challenges and social determinants of health in partnership with local community organizations. Lectures and tutorials will support learning of selected biological and social aspects of health and disease, neuroscience, genetics or population health, and the development of scientific knowledge translation skills relevant to the community agencies. Cannot be taken concurrently with a full year research project course.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​BIO255H1, HMB265H1/​BIO260H1, BCH210H1, PSL300H1, PSL301H1, HMB200H1/​HMB201H1/​HMB202H1/​HMB203H1/​HMB204H1
Exclusion: HMB473H1
Recommended Preparation: a 300-level science lab course
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4); Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS100H1 - Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science

Hours: 24L/10T

An investigation of some pivotal periods in the history of science with an emphasis on the influences of philosophy on the scientists of the period, and the philosophical and social implications of the scientific knowledge, theory and methodology that emerged.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS440H1 - Topics in History of Medicine

Previous Course Number: HPS303H1

Hours: 24S

This course offers a focused discussion of several aspects of the history of medicine. Various themes are examined in depth year to year so as to familiarize students with different topics and methodological approaches.

Prerequisite: HPS318H1 and/or HPS319H1, or at least 1.0 FCE of HPS courses or History courses with a focus on the history of science at the 300-level or higher, or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: HPS303H1
Recommended Preparation: This course assumes some background in the history of medicine and/or history of science, and having engaged in historical research projects.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HST310H1 - Critical Health Policy

Previous Course Number: UNI310H1

Hours: 24L

A critical, in-depth exploration of contemporary health and social issues. Political, social and economic forces at play in Canadian society are examined in relation to specific health issues and policies, in order to understand general societal and system dynamics of evolution and change, and to identify implications for reform efforts.

Prerequisite: HST211H1
Exclusion: UNI310H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HST330H1 - Population Health

Previous Course Number: UNI330H1

Hours: 24L

Extends students´ understanding of population-based strategies of health promotion in Canada. Topics include: variations in health status as affected by population patterns, class, gender, ethnicity, employment, and family composition; major causes of morbidity and mortality; the concept of "community health", opportunities and constraints facing public policy.

Prerequisite: HST209H1
Exclusion: UNI330H1
Recommended Preparation: HST250H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HST400Y1 - Health Studies Practicum

Hours: 172P/24S

Individual field placement with a health-related institution or organization, in which the student applies theory and skills to specific projects and/or tasks. Culminates in an oral and written report. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: HST350H1/​HST350Y1 or permission of the Director

IMC200H1 - Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Hours: 24L

How do innovations become useful in society? What is needed for a company to use such innovations successfully? Why and how do individuals and companies commercialize new ideas or technologies? This course provides a broad introduction to entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial skills and the methodology used by entrepreneurs to start a new venture.

Prerequisite: 4.0 FCEs in any subject
Exclusion: RSM100H1
Recommended Preparation: No particular preparation needed. The course is targeted at students from all disciplines (science, humanities, social sciences), who are interested in entrepreneurship. Because this is an introductory course, students who have previously taken entrepreneurship courses are strongly discouraged from registering.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

IMC391H1 - Exploring New Ventures

Hours: 12L/48P

This experiential learning course allows students to explore the inner working of new venture companies or other innovative organizations. The majority of the course consists of activities applying entrepreneurial concepts within a local organization, with oversight from the Impact Centre. In-class activities facilitate the application of entrepreneurial tools to develop the students’ entrepreneurial skills.

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCEs in any subject.
Corequisite: IMC200H1/​RSM100H1/​MGT100H1
Exclusion: IMC390Y1, IMC392Y1
Recommended Preparation: The experiential learning activities are targeted at students from all disciplines including science, social sciences and humanities.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

IMC392Y1 - Exploring New Ventures

Hours: 12L/96P

This experiential learning course allows students to explore the inner working of new venture companies or other innovative organizations. The majority of the course consists of activities applying entrepreneurial concepts within a local organization, with oversight from the Impact Centre. In-class activities facilitate the application of entrepreneurial tools to develop the students’ entrepreneurial skills.

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCEs in any subject.
Corequisite: IMC200H1/​RSM100H1/​MGT100H1
Exclusion: IMC390Y1, IMC391H1
Recommended Preparation: The experiential learning activities are targeted at students from all disciplines including science, social sciences and humanities.
Distribution Requirements: Science; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

INI103H1 - Writing Essays

Hours: 24L/12T

A course on essay writing designed to equip students with the skills required to write on different subjects and in a variety of different genres (including critical analysis, the narrative essay, and argumentative writing). By unpacking the stages of the writing process, this course helps students develop research, critical reading, planning, organization, writing, editing, and proofreading skills.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

INI201H1 - Theories of Rhetoric: A Brief History of Persuasion

Hours: 36S

The history of rhetoric, the philosophical art of persuasion, is a complex one bound up with the histories of philosophy, literature, and religion, the rise and fall of empires, and the emergence of modern science and media technology. We will examine the development of rhetoric over time, from the roots of the discipline in classical antiquity to the genesis of modern and postmodern rhetoric, including the New Rhetoric. We will then focus on contemporary rhetorical currents in language philosophy, gender studies, critical race studies, and affect theory.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

INI235H1 - A Multidisciplinary Introduction to Urban Studies I: Theoretical Foundations of City Building

Previous Course Number: INI235Y1

Hours: 24L

Focuses on the theoretical foundations of urbanization, urban change, and city building, with particular attention on global urban growth, history of contemporary urbanization, urban planning, governance, built form, and economic development. These topics are explored through a multidisciplinary lens, with an emphasis on understanding urban transitions over time and their meaning for contemporary urban experience.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 FCEs, including 1.0 FCEs from one of the following four course groups. Economics: ECO101H1, ECO102H1, ECO105Y1; Geography: GGR101H1, GGR107H1, GGR112H1, GGR124H1; Political Science: POL101Y1, POL101H1, POL106H1, POL107H1, POL109H1, POL214Y1; Sociology: SOC100H1, SOC150H1.
Exclusion: INI235Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

INI437Y1 - Urban Experiential Learning in Toronto & the GTA

Previous Course Number: INI306Y1

Hours: 72S

A method of studying city issues that combines readings, seminar discussions, and field trips with an 8 hour / week internship in the office of a municipal politician, local government, or non-profit organization. Readings focus on community development, urban planning, economic development and local governance. Students must fill out a ballot for the course (available by contacting the Urban Studies Program Office) by June 1st. Enrolment in this course is competitive and at the discretion of the Urban Studies Director and/or course instructor.

Prerequisite: INI235H1, INI236H1. Priority is given to students enrolled in the Urban Studies Minor, Major, or Specialist Programs. However, consideration may be given to students with suitable course background as determined by the Program Director. Note: INI437Y1 cannot be taken concurrently with JGI450Y1.
Exclusion: INI306Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

INS220Y1 - Introduction to Kanien’kéha (Mohawk Language)

Hours: 72L

An introduction to Kanien’kéha (Mohawk Language), a member of the Iroquoian language family.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

INS250H1 - Indigenous Environmental Science and Practice

Hours: 24L

This course is a study of the ecological and scientific teachings of Indigenous peoples. The course provides and overview of Indigenous peoples' relationships with the natural world in historical and contemporary environmental issues and their implications for Indigenous Peoples and others.

Prerequisite: INS201Y1
Exclusion: ABS250H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

INS301Y1 - Indigenous Languages and Cultures

Hours: 48L

Examination of the historical interplay of Indigenous languages and cultures in Canada. Particular focus is on the language and culture of an Indigenous people of Ontario.

Prerequisite: 5 FCE including INS201Y1, plus one additional INS full course equivalent
Exclusion: ABS301Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

INS302H1 - Indigenous Representation in the Mass Media and Society

Hours: 24L

A survey of historical and contemporary representations of Indigenous people in the mass media. Introduction to basic techniques for evaluating, analyzing, and understanding the construction of Indigeneity as it is communicated through film, television, and other media. Examination of racial stereotypes and the role of mass communication in perpetuating and challenging stereotypes, cultural appropriation, Indigenous media production, impact of media portrayal of Indigenous peoples.

Prerequisite: 8 FCE including INS201Y1, plus one additional INS full course equivalent
Exclusion: ABS302H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

INS323Y1 - Kanien’kéha II

Hours: 72L

Further study of Kanien’kéha.

Prerequisite: INS220Y1
Exclusion: ABS323Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

INS355H1 - Current Issues in Indigenous Environment and Health

Hours: 24L

This course will examine current views about Indigenous peoples' health and relationship to environment. The course will focus on Indigenous peoples' perceptions of health and contemporary health systems, including policy, politics and practices.

Prerequisite: 8 FCE, including INS201Y1, plus one additional INS designator course
Exclusion: ABS355H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

INS360Y1 - Politics and Process of Reconciliation in Canada

Hours:

This course uses relationship-building methodologies to develop skills to examine and explore the concept and processes, practice and promises of reconciliation. Through class discussion/seminars, guest speakers, and comparative readings in: Canadian and Indigenous colonial history; the findings of the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission; Canadian Human Rights Tribunal Decisions; and Indigenous solidarity movements in Canada. Students will examine reconciliation and determine whether it is a different process than 'decolonization'.

Prerequisite: INS201Y1, or permission of instructor
Exclusion: ABS360Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

INS407H1 - Indigenous Environmental Justice

Hours: 36L

In this course, we will examine how Indigenous land and water governance have been impacted by colonial policies and extractive capitalist developments. We will discuss how Indigenous peoples negotiate and resist such impacts while also renewing responsibilities with land, water, and animal and plant relations. The course is primarily focused on the North American context, with many case studies taking place in Canada.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 14 FCE, including INS201Y1 and at least two additional INS designator full course equivalents or GGR321H1. Permission of the instructor is required.
Exclusion: ABS407H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE379H1 - Research & Analytics for Industrial Relations and Human Resources

Hours: 24L/12T

Data science is changing the way organizations make decisions. This course introduces a data analytics perspective on employment relations and human resources, including the measurement of performance metrics, analysis of organizational policies, and visualization of data. Students will develop basic data skills in the R statistical computing environment.

Prerequisite: IRE240H1/​IRE244H1/​IRE260H1
Exclusion: WDW379H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ITA199H1 - Italian Fascism and Global Responses: The Dark Side of Italianità

Hours: 24L

After WWI, Italian society faced a political, economic, and moral crisis that resulted in the rise of fascism. Using diverse sources (media, literary texts, movies, architecture and design), this course explores various reactions in Italy and abroad to the rise of Mussolini and the totalitarian State. Why did common people, intellectuals, politicians, and business and community leaders around the globe succumb to the seduction of fascism? How did other people denounce fascist violence? After an introduction to Italian fascism, the course will consider global reactions to Italian fascism and diverse responses in Italian communities abroad (e.g. Canada, USA, Argentina). Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: None
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JEG100H1 - Introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Science

Hours: 24L/12P

This introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Sciences examines the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and biosphere, emphasizing processes, flows of energy and materials, and the interconnectedness of these Earth systems. Specific topics include weather and climate, earth materials, geological and geomorphic processes involved in the genesis of landforms, river systems, glaciers, soils, and biomes.

Exclusion: GGR100H1, ESS102H1, EESA06H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

JFG388H1 - Bilingualism, Multilingualism, and Second Language Acquisition

Previous Course Number: FRE388H1

Hours: 24L/12T

Knowing and speaking more than one language is the everyday norm of people living in much of the world including in multicultural cities like Toronto. Via an in-depth introduction to the cognitive and social underpinnings of bi- and multilingualism including second language acquisition, this course provides answers to questions such as How do bilinguals/multilinguals differ from monolinguals in the ways that they process and use language? How does acquiring a language as an adult differ from when we are children? How do an individual’s language repertoires interact with those of their peers and local community?

Prerequisite: (1) Any 100-level or higher language course OR introductory linguistics course (e.g., LIN200H1, FRE272H1, ITA360H1, SLA323H1/​SLA380H1, SPA322H1); (2) At least 4 FCEs in any subject.
Exclusion: FRE388H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

JHA384H1 - Japan in the World, Mid-16th to Mid-20th century

Hours: 24L

This course examines Japan within the context of world history from the mid-16th to the mid-20th century. Rather than seek comprehensive coverage of Japan's national history along a linear timeline, we will use Japan as a lens through which to consider key moments in the history of the modern world.

Prerequisite: One course from: HIS102Y1, HIS103Y1, HIS107Y1, HIS241H1, HIS242H1, HIS244H1, HIS250H1, HIS250Y1, HIS271Y1, HIS280Y1, HIS281Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS291H1, HIS291Y1, HIS292H1, HIS292Y1, HIS297Y1, or 1.0 credit from CAS200H1, CAS201H1, CAS202H1, CAS310H1, CAS320H1.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JHA394H1 - The Asia Pacific War

Hours: 24L

This course examines the Second World War in the Asia Pacific region and highlights: (1) how imperialism and colonialism of both the Euro-American and Japanese varieties were central to the War's outbreak, conduct, and “resolution”; (2) various “local” rather than simply national experiences and memories of the War, including those of marginalized groups in Japan and its colonies, “comfort women,” victims of war atrocities, Asian North Americans, African Americans, and Pacific Islanders.

Prerequisite: One course from: HIS107Y1, HIS242H1, HIS250H1, HIS251H1, HIS263Y1, HIS271Y1, HIS280Y1, HIS281Y1, HIS282Y1, HIS283Y1, HIS284Y1, HIS292Y1, HIS311Y1, HIS317H1, HIS328H1, HIS338H1, HIS343H1, HIS343Y1, HIS344H1, HIS344Y1, HIS351Y1, HIS361Y1, HIS377H1, HIS385H1, HIS385Y1, or 1.0 credit from CAS200H1, CAS201H1, CAS202H1, CAS310H1, CAS320H1.
Recommended Preparation: One or more courses on Japan, China, Korea, or Southeast Asia in any department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JHA410H1 - Clinical Neuroimaging

Hours: 24L/12T

This course focuses on the use of neuroimaging techniques in understanding how trauma, disorders, and disease impact neural structure and function. Lectures will focus on introduction to techniques and clinical/research applications. Lab work will focus on the development of practical skills including image processing, analyses, and experimental design.

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, PSL300H1, BIO230H1, HMB200H1/​PSY290H1/​ANA300Y1
Recommended Preparation: HMB320H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

JIA400H1 - Interdisciplinary Practice for the Arts

Hours: 72P

While examining the interconnectedness of the arts, students are required to meet between sessions and develop projects connected to their study. These projects involve a range of media, including theatre, film, music and visual art (installation).

Prerequisite: 14 FCE and an interview/proposal.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JLS473H1 - Adult Speech and Language Disorders

Hours: 36L

Students are introduced to the etiologies and characteristics of speech and language disorders in adults, associated with aphasia, neurodegenerative disorders, and head injuries. The effects of communication handicaps on the individual and theoretical underpinnings of the major intervention approaches for adults are discussed. Given by the Departments of Linguistics and Speech Language Pathology. (Not offered every year)

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1, and one FCE at the 300+ level
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

JLS475H1 - Literacy and Reading Disorders

Hours: 36L

Literacy and Reading Disorders is an introduction to the typical development of emergent literacy skills, including oral language, phonological awareness, narratives, and emergent writing in children; a discussion of the effects of language disorders on emergent literacy skills; a survey of approaches to intervention for children’s emergent literacy skills. Given by the Departments of Linguistics and Speech Language Pathology. (Not offered every year)

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1, and one FCE at the 300+ level
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

JLS476H1 - Linguistics in the Workforce: Clinical Practice and Research

Hours: 36S

This course exposes students to research and practical approaches in the context of health professions of relevance to linguistics students, especially audiology and speech-language pathology. Students learn about evidence-informed practice, research methodologies, practice approaches and theories in the health professions. Students will be poised to benefit from optional service learning placements during or following the course, in research laboratories or clinical settings. Successful completion of this course provides students with exposure and experience of use in their applications to audiology, speech-language pathology, and other clinical programs and in their future health or graduate studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (Not offered every year).

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1, and one FCE at the 200+ level
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

JPA331Y1 - Issues in Contemporary Chinese Politics

Hours: 48L

The course covers topics of interest in China from the Communist takeover in 1949 through to the reform period of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s. It will also address aspects of China’s diplomacy related to its growing economic power. (Given by the Department of Political Science and the Contemporary Asian Studies Program)

Prerequisite: 2.0 POL FCEs or 1.0 CAS FCEs
Exclusion: POLC16H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

LIN331H1 - Syntactic Theory

Hours: 36L

A course in syntactic theory and analysis within a current formal framework. (Students who want to pursue graduate studies in linguistics are strongly advised to include this course in their program.)

Prerequisite: LIN232H1
Exclusion: LIN331H5, LINC11H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN441H1 - Advanced Semantics and Pragmatics

Hours: 24S

This course covers current research in formal semantics and pragmatics. Topics may vary from year to year. The course is intended to be a seminar-style course; it includes reading primary literature and writing a research paper.

Prerequisite: LIN341H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN490H1 - Special Topics in Linguistics

Hours: 24S

A specific topic in linguistics will be explored in depth in Special Topics in Linguistics. Students will learn about a narrowly-focused area of linguistics, including guided instruction in how to undertake critical reading of primary literature, develop a research topic and write a linguistics research paper. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (Not offered every year)

Prerequisite: 2.0 LIN FCE at the 200+ level, of which 1.0 LIN FCE must be at the 300+ level. Permission of the instructor will also be required.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

MAT133Y1 - Calculus and Linear Algebra for Commerce

Hours: 72L

Mathematics of finance. Matrices and linear equations. Review of differential calculus; applications. Integration and fundamental theorem; applications. Introduction to partial differentiation; applications.

NOTE: please note Prerequisites listed below. Students without the proper prerequisites for MAT133Y1 may be deregistered from this course.

Note that MAT133Y is not a valid prerequisite for a number of more advanced quantitative courses. Students who are considering a quantitative non-Commerce PoSt, such as a math minor or a stats minor, may want to consider MAT135H and MAT136H, MAT137Y, or MAT157Y instead of MAT133Y. Specifically, a student who took MAT133Y may need to subsequently take MAT135H and MAT136H as "extra" or take MAT137Y or MAT157Y in order to proceed in non-Commerce PoSts.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MAT135H1, MAT136H1, MAT137Y1, MAT157Y1, MATA30H3, MATA31H3, MATA32H3, MATA33H3, MATA35H3, MATA36H3, MATA37H3, MAT133Y5, MAT134Y5, MAT135Y5, MAT137Y5, MAT138Y5, MAT186H, MAT187H, MAT196H & MAT197H, ESC194H, ESC195H
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT135H1 - Calculus I

Hours: 36L/12T

In this first introduction to Calculus, students will be introduced to the tools of differential calculus, the branch of calculus that is motivated by the problem of measuring how quantities change. Students will use these tools to solve other problems, including simplifying functions with straight lines, describing how different types of change are related, and computing maximum and minimum quantities. This course will focus on developing a deep understanding of why the tools of calculus make sense and how to apply them to the social, biological, and physical sciences. It will also emphasize translating between algebraic, graphical, numerical and verbal descriptions of each concept studied.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MAT133Y1, MAT136H1, MAT137Y1, MAT157Y1, MATA30H3, MATA31H3, MATA32H3, MATA33H3, MATA35H3, MATA36H3, MATA37H3, MAT133Y5, MAT134Y5, MAT135Y5, MAT137Y5, MAT138Y5, MAT186H, MAT187H, MAT196H, MAT197H, ESC194H, ESC195H,
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT136H1 - Calculus II

Hours: 36L/12T

This second part of the introductory Calculus sequence focuses on integral calculus beginning with the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, the connection between two seemingly unrelated problems: measuring changing quantities and finding areas of curved shapes. Students will develop a deep understanding of the integral, and use it to: unpack equations involving derivatives; to make sense of infinite sums; to write complicated functions as 'infinite polynomials'; and to compute areas, volumes, and totals in applied problems. This course will further develop students' abilities to translate between algebraic, graphical, numerical, and verbal descriptions of mathematics in a variety of applied contexts.

Prerequisite: MAT135H1
Exclusion: MAT133Y1, MAT137Y1, MAT157Y1, MATA32H3, MATA33H3, MATA36H3, MATA37H3, MAT133Y5, MAT134Y5, MAT135Y5, MAT137Y5, MAT138Y5, MAT186H, MAT187H, MAT196H, MAT197H, ESC194H, ESC195H.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT137Y1 - Calculus with Proofs

Hours: 72L/24T

A conceptual approach for students with a serious interest in mathematics. Attention is given to computational aspects as well as theoretical foundations and problem solving techniques. Review of Trigonometry. Limits and continuity, mean value theorem, inverse function theorem, differentiation, integration, fundamental theorem of calculus, elementary transcendental functions, Taylor's theorem, sequence and series, power series. Applications.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MAT135H1, MAT136H1, MAT157Y1, MATA35H3, MATA36H3, MATA37H3, MAT135Y5, MAT137Y5, MAT138Y5, MAT187H, MAT196H, MAT197H, ESC194H, ESC195H.
Recommended Preparation: Students will receive credit for both MAT137Y1 and MAT138H1 if MAT138H1 is taken before or along with MAT137Y1.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT157Y1 - Analysis I

Hours: 72L/48T

A theoretical course in calculus; emphasizing proofs and techniques, as well as geometric and physical understanding. Trigonometric identities. Limits and continuity; least upper bounds, intermediate and extreme value theorems. Derivatives, mean value and inverse function theorems. Integrals; fundamental theorem; elementary transcendental functions. Techniques of integration. Taylor's theorem; sequences and series; uniform convergence and power series.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MAT137Y1, MATA37H3, MAT137Y5, MAT157Y5, MAT197H1, ESC195H1.
Recommended Preparation: Students should consider taking the Preparing for University Math Level II in order to prepare in advance for MAT157Y1. Students may also take MAT138H1 concurrently with MAT157Y1. Students will receive credit for both MAT157Y1 and MAT138H1 if MAT138H1 is taken before or along with MAT157Y1.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT193H1 - Mathematics through Literature & Poetry

Hours: 36S

Mathematics intersects with literature and poetry in a multitude of ways. In this seminar, students will study literary works that include mathematicians, are about mathematicians, and contain mathematical forms. These works will be a springboard for mathematical investigations that build a deeper understanding of and appreciation for mathematics. This course is appropriate for students with all mathematical backgrounds who are not taking another math course. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: High school level algebra.
Exclusion: Not intended for students in a Mathematics Specialist or Major program.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT198H1 - Cryptology: The Mathematics of Secrecy and Security

Hours: 24S

How do we send our own confidential information through secure channels, and how can we break codes to uncover the secret information of our adversaries? The mathematical field of cryptology is dedicated to answering such questions. In this course we will study breakthroughs in cryptology, from secret messages in the ancient world and the Enigma cipher in World War II, to modern cryptosystems that facilitate online commerce. Along the way, you will develop a sophisticated understanding of how numbers interact and develop the ability to communicate messages secretly and mathematics clearly. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: High school level algebra.
Exclusion: Not intended for students in a Mathematics Specialist or Major program.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT199H1 - Women's Mathematics

Hours: 36S

Mathematics has been shaped in significant ways by the work of outstanding female mathematicians such as Hypatia, Emmy Noether, Sofia Kovalevskaya, and Maryam Mirzakhani. Despite these successes, women still experience barriers to entering the field and participating at the highest levels. This course will blend an exploration of mathematics created by women with a study of the issue of women in mathematics. Students will have the opportunity to examine the complex factors that impact women's participation in STEM, learn about the lives of female mathematicians, create their own mathematics, and sharpen their spatial cognition and logical thinking skills. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: High school level algebra
Exclusion: Not intended for students in a Mathematical Specialist or Major program.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT223H1 - Linear Algebra I

Hours: 36L/12T

Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, real vector spaces, subspaces, span, linear dependence and independence, bases, rank, inner products, orthogonality, orthogonal complements, Gram-Schmidt, linear transformations, determinants, Cramer's rule, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, eigenspaces, diagonalization.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MATA22H3, MATA23H3, MAT223H5, MAT224H1, MAT240H1, MAT240H5, MAT247H1, MAT247H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT224H1 - Linear Algebra II

Hours: 36L/12T

Fields, complex numbers, vector spaces over a field, linear transformations, matrix of a linear transformation, kernel, range, dimension theorem, isomorphisms, change of basis, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalizability, real and complex inner products, spectral theorem, adjoint/self-adjoint/normal linear operators, triangular form, nilpotent mappings, Jordan canonical form.

Prerequisite: MAT221H1(80%)/MAT223H1/​MAT240H1/​MATA22H3
Exclusion: MAT247H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT409H1 - Set Theory

Hours: 36L

Set theory and its relations with other branches of mathematics. ZFC axioms. Ordinal and cardinal numbers. Reflection principle. Constructible sets and the continuum hypothesis. Introduction to independence proofs. Topics from large cardinals, infinitary combinatorics and descriptive set theory.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT409H1/MAT1404H

Prerequisite: MAT357H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT417H1 - Analytic Number Theory

Hours: 36L

A selection from the following: distribution of primes, especially in arithmetic progressions and short intervals; exponential sums; Hardy-Littlewood and dispersion methods; character sums and L-functions; the Riemann zeta-function; sieve methods, large and small; diophantine approximation, modular forms.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT417H1/MAT1202H

Prerequisite: MAT334H1/​MAT354H1/​permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT436H1 - Introduction to Linear Operators

Hours: 36L

The course will survey the branch of mathematics developed (in its abstract form) primarily in the twentieth century and referred to variously as functional analysis, linear operators in Hilbert space, and operator algebras, among other names (for instance, more recently, to reflect the rapidly increasing scope of the subject, the phrase non-commutative geometry has been introduced). The intention will be to discuss a number of the topics in Pedersen's textbook Analysis Now. Students will be encouraged to lecture on some of the material, and also to work through some of the exercises in the textbook (or in the suggested reference books).

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT436H1/MAT1011H

Prerequisite: 5.0 FCE from MAT, including MAT224H1/​MAT247H1 and MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT437H1 - K-Theory and C* Algebras

Hours: 36L

The theory of operator algebras was begun by John von Neumann eighty years ago. In one of the most important innovations of this theory, von Neumann and Murray introduced a notion of equivalence of projections in a self-adjoint algebra (*-algebra) of Hilbert space operators that was compatible with addition of orthogonal projections (also in matrix algebras over the algebra), and so gave rise to an abelian semigroup, now referred to as the Murray-von Neumann semigroup.

Later, Grothendieck in geometry, Atiyah and Hirzebruch in topology, and Serre in the setting of arbitrary rings (pertinent for instance for number theory), considered similar constructions. The enveloping group of the semigroup considered in each of these settings is now referred to as the K-group (Grothendieck's terminology), or as the Grothendieck group.

Among the many indications of the depth of this construction was the discovery of Atiyah and Hirzebruch that Bott periodicity could be expressed in a simple way using the K-group. Also, Atiyah and Singer famously showed that K-theory was important in connection with the Fredholm index. Partly because of these developments, K-theory very soon became important again in the theory of operator algebras. (And in turn, operator algebras became increasingly important in other branches of mathematics.)

The purpose of this course is to give a general, elementary, introduction to the ideas of K-theory in the operator algebra context. (Very briefly, K-theory generalizes the notion of dimension of a vector space.)

The course will begin with a description of the method (K-theoretical in spirit) used by Murray and von Neumann to give a rough initial classification of von Neumann algebras (into types I, II, and III). It will centre around the relatively recent use of K-theory to study Bratteli's approximately finite-dimensional C*-algebras---both to classify them (a result that can be formulated and proved purely algebraically), and to prove that the class of these C*-algebras---what Bratteli called AF algebras---is closed under passing to extensions (a result that uses the Bott periodicity feature of K-theory).

Students will be encouraged to prepare oral or written reports on various subjects related to the course, including basic theory and applications.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT437H1/MAT1016H

Prerequisite: 5.0 FCE from MAT, including MAT224H1/​MAT247H1 and MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1.
Recommended Preparation: Students are encouraged to execute basic research that answers the question, what is an abelian group?
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT445H1 - Representation Theory

Hours: 36L

A selection of topics from: Representation theory of finite groups, topological groups and compact groups. Group algebras. Character theory and orthogonality relations. Weyl's character formula for compact semisimple Lie groups. Induced representations. Structure theory and representations of semisimple Lie algebras. Determination of the complex Lie algebras.

Joint undergraduate/graduate - MAT445H1/MAT1196H

Prerequisite: MAT347Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT448H1 - Introduction to Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Geometry

Hours: 36L

Basic notions of algebraic geometry, with emphasis on commutative algebra or geometry according to the interests of the instructor. Algebraic topics: localization, integral dependence and Hilbert's Nullstellensatz, valuation theory, power series rings and completion, dimension theory. Geometric topics: affine and projective varieties, dimension and intersection theory, curves and surfaces, varieties over the complex numbers. This course will be offered in alternating years.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT448H1/MAT1155H

Prerequisite: MAT347Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT454H1 - Complex Analysis II

Hours: 36L

Harmonic functions, Harnack's principle, Poisson's integral formula and Dirichlet's problem. Infinite products and the gamma function. Normal families and the Riemann mapping theorem. Analytic continuation, monodromy theorem and elementary Riemann surfaces. Elliptic functions, the modular function and the little Picard theorem.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT454H1/MAT1002H

Prerequisite: MAT354H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT457H1 - Advanced Real Analysis I

Hours: 36L

Lebesque measure and integration; convergence theorems, Fubini's theorem, Lebesgue differentiation theorem, abstract measures, Caratheodory theorem, Radon-Nikodym theorem. Hilbert spaces, orthonormal bases, Riesz representation theorem, compact operators, L^p spaces, Hölder and Minkowski inequalities.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT457H1/MAT1000H

Prerequisite: MAT357H1
Exclusion: MAT457Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT458H1 - Advanced Real Analysis II

Hours: 36L

Fourier series and transform, convergence results, Fourier inversion theorem, L^2 theory, estimates, convolutions. Banach spaces, duals, weak topology, weak compactness, Hahn-Banach theorem, open mapping theorem, uniform boundedness theorem.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT458H1/MAT1001H

Prerequisite: MAT457H1
Exclusion: MAT457Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT464H1 - Riemannian Geometry

Hours: 36L

Riemannian metrics. Levi-Civita connection. Geodesics. Exponential map. Second fundamental form. Complete manifolds and Hopf-Rinow theorem. Curvature tensors. Ricci curvature and scalar curvature. Spaces of constant curvature.

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT464H1/MAT1342H

Prerequisite: MAT367H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT482H1 - Topics in Mathematics

Hours: 36L

A course in mathematics on a topic outside the current undergraduate offerings. For information on the specific topic to be studied and possible additional prerequisites, go to http://www.math.toronto.edu/cms/current-students-ug/

Joint undergraduate/graduate course - MAT482H1/MAT1901H

Prerequisite: 6.0 FCE in 100-level, 200-level, and 300-level APM and MAT courses. Possible additional topic-specific prerequisites.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MGY280H1 - Second Year Specialist Research

Hours: 48P/12S

This course gives students enrolled in the Molecular Genetics and Microbiology Specialist or Biochemistry Specialist program an opportunity to conduct an original research project in the second semester of their second year in a research laboratory in either of those Departments. Laboratory assignments are chosen during the first semester of second year by agreement with a Departmental faculty member and the Course Coordinator. Attendance at a weekly meeting is mandatory and students will present a report at the end of term. Details can be found on the departmental website. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Specialist Program in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology or in Biochemistry. Student cannot have completed more than 8.5 FCE.
Exclusion: MGY299Y1 and other ROP299Y1 courses
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MUS120Y1 - Vocal and Instrumental Ensembles I

Hours: 144P

Students rehearse and perform in concerts and reading sessions as assigned by the Faculty of Music. Provides experience in choral groups, orchestra, or in concert band and large wind groups of diverse instrumentation. Development of musicianship skills through performance of large ensemble works; emphasis on sight-reading, ear-training, and musical knowledge.

Attendance at all sessions is required. Placement audition and permission of the Department required.Download the excerpt that is relevant to the instrument you would like to audition on; excerpts will be available at www.music.utoronto.ca beginning early July. Complete and return the MUS120Y1 & MUS220Y1 Audition Request Form before August 15, 2020.

Once your request form is received, you will be notified of your audition time. Placement audition will be held on September 8th, 9th or 10th in the Edward Johnson Building. The audition will be 10 minutes in length.

Exclusion: MUS291Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MUS220Y1 - Vocal and Instrumental Ensembles II

Hours: 144P

Students rehearse and perform in concerts and reading sessions as assigned by the Faculty of Music. Provides experience in choral groups, orchestra, or in concert band and large wind groups of diverse instrumentation. Development of musicianship skills through performance of large ensemble works; emphasis on sight-reading, ear-training, and musical knowledge. Attendance at all sessions is required. Placement audition and permission of the Department required. Download the excerpt that is relevant to the instrument you would like to audition on; excerpts will be available at www.music.utoronto.ca beginning early July. Complete and return the MUS120Y1 & MUS220Y1 Audition Request Form before August 15, 2020. Once your request form is received, you will be notified of your audition time. Placement audition will be held on September 8th, 9th or 10th in the Edward Johnson Building. The audition will be 10 minutes in length.

Prerequisite: MUS120Y1. Placement audition and permission of the Department required.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW241Y1 - Introduction to Critical Disability Studies

Hours: 48L/24T

Draws on an intersectional history and politics of normativity and bodily difference to understand disability as a diverse and materially salient social category that can be used as a lens to better understand systems and experiences of colonization, race, class, gender, age, etc. Explores scenes of disability or 'crip' solidarity, resistance and cultural production, disability D/deaf and mad arts, coalitional movements for disability justice, collective approaches to access and other non-normative ways of knowing and being.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW270H1 - Community (dis)Engagement and Solidarity

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to issues and questions arising from the field of 'community engagement'. Explores the meaning, practices and implications of/for 'community' and 'community (dis)engagement' from multiple perspectives (e.g. the State and its agencies, institutional power, colonial discourse, communities of embodied difference, etc.) Takes a multi-media and arts-based approach to examining self-care from an anti-colonial perspective of central importance in the practice and pedagogy of critical equity and solidarity in the collective struggle for freedom and transformation.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW340H1 - Special Topics in Equity Studies

Hours: 36L

An upper level course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW341H1 - Theorizing Settler Colonialism, Capitalism and Race

Hours: 24S

Provides students with a theoretical background for understanding settler colonialism, capitalist social relations and difference (including race, class, gender, disability and sexuality) and solidarity. Provides an analysis of state violence and the formation of hegemonic power relations. Introduces students to the method of thinking dialectically to examine the social world as a set of relations between multiple phenomena occurring at the same time. Articulates an emancipatory politics of knowledge production and strategies of building solidarities to enable the imagination of a different future.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW342H1 - Theory and Praxis in Food Security

Hours: 24S

Explores the concept of food security in the context of equity issues related to global food systems. Students participate in food-related field work activities outside of regular classroom time.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW344H1 - Body Matters: Oppression, Solidarity and Justice

Hours: 24L

Through lectures, small-group discussions and experiential activities, explores how intersecting cultural stories impact our bodies and how stories inscribed upon us shape and constrain our relations, perceptions, experiences and vulnerabilities as embodied subjects. Draws on work in cultural studies, critical race and decolonial theory, gender studies, queer, trans and disability theory and fat studies to ask: Whose bodies matter? How do bodies come to matter? And, how are we - as embodied beings - engaged in acts of rewriting, resisting and otherwise transforming the body means and what it can do?

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1/​NEW241Y1
Exclusion: NEW344Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW344Y1 - Body Matters: Oppression, Solidarity and Justice

Hours: 48L

Through lectures, small-group discussions and experiential activities, explores how intersecting cultural stories impact our bodies and how stories inscribed upon us shape and constrain our relations, perceptions, experiences and vulnerabilities as embodied subjects. Draws on work in cultural studies, critical race and decolonial theory, gender studies, queer, trans and disability theory and fat studies to ask: Whose bodies matter? How do bodies come to matter? And, how are we - as embodied beings - engaged in acts of rewriting, resisting and otherwise transforming the body means and what it can do?

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1/​NEW241Y1
Exclusion: NEW344H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW345H1 - Equity and Activism in Education

Hours: 24L

Examines contemporary issues in education and schooling from a social justice and equity perspective. Engages with a variety of theoretical frameworks including anti-homophobia education, critical pedagogy, critical race theory, decolonizing knowledges, and intersectionality. Includes an overview of educational activist projects.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW346H1 - Community Organizing and Global Solidarity

Hours: 24L

Considers, from an interdisciplinary perspective, the evolution of community organizations and non-profits in the context of neoliberalism, settler colonialism, and imperialism. Examines the inter-woven relations of political economy, local community development, marginalized communities in Canada, and emergent forms of global/local solidarity.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW347H1 - Critical Race and Anti-Racism Studies

Hours: 36L

Considers what it means to pursue integrative anti-racism in organizational/institutional settings such as the workplace, justice system, media and education through a study of theories on race and philosophical tenets of anti-racism. Examines the concept of race as a pedagogical discourse and social-political practice across local, national and global contexts.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW348H1 - Special Topics in Equity Studies

Hours: 24L

An upper level course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW349H1 - Disability Arts and Culture

Hours: 24S

Explores the work of disabled, mad, sick and/or Deaf artists and considers how disability disrupts - or 'crips' - artistic spaces and cultural movements. Engaged with contemporary debates emanating from within these spaces and movements to revewal disability as a dynamic range of bodily practices, aesthetics and relations.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW440Y1 - Advanced Special Topics in Equity Studies

Hours: 72L

An advanced level seminar course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1 and an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW441H1 - Advanced Topics in Equity Studies

Hours: 24S

An advanced level seminar course. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

NEW442H1 - Food Systems and the Politics of Resistance

Hours: 36L

Examines the food we eat in the local and global context of food systems, food sovereignty and food movements. Explores the possibilities for food as a catalyst for learning, resistance and social change. Consult the Program Office for course enrolment procedures.

Note: This is a joint graduate/undergraduate course.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits, NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1, NEW342H1, an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course, a GPA of at least 3.5 in NEW Equity Studies courses.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW443H1 - Advanced Special Topics in Equity Studies

Hours: 36S

An advanced level seminar course. Topics of study vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1 and an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW444H1 - Anti-Colonization and the Politics of Violence

Hours: 36S

This advanced seminar interrogates how the theorizations, embodied lived experiences and lived resistance to structural violence can create social, epistemological, ontological and political decolonizing/anti-colonial transformation. The work of Frantz Fanon, John Akomfrah, The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, Elaine Brown and Assata Shakur amongst others are utilized to search for alternative and oppositional ways to rethink and re-respond to violence. The seminar pursues a nuanced understanding of violence as it relates to de/anticolonization as a lived praxis of resistance and as a practice of self-defense that is grounded in the assertion that there can be no decolonization without anticolonization.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1 and an additional 0.5 Critical Studies in Equity and Solidarity Core Group 300+ level course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW446H1 - Community Development and Social Change

Hours: 36L

Explores the significance of community development as a social change strategy, through a critical social analysis of local and global case studies and policies. Consult the Program Office for course enrolment procedures.

Note: This is a joint graduate/undergraduate course.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits, NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1, NEW346H1, an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course, a GPA of at least 3.5 in NEW Equity Studies courses.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW447H1 - Race, Ethnicity and Educational Praxis

Hours: 36L

An application of critical race, ethnicity and social difference discourse to educational praxis. Examines the articulation of theoretical perspectives to explain particular incidents in society, and to understand forms of institutional racism and emerging minority responses. Explores the implications for pedagogical practices in education.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1, NEW347H1 and one additional half-course at the 300+ level in Equity Studies; permission of Program Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW448H1 - Disability and the Child

Hours: 24S

Examines a range of historical and present-day meanings associated with the figure of the disabled child. Draws on work emanating from a variety of disciplines, including history, psychology, neuroscience, visual arts, film and literature, and engaging with critical theories of race, class, gender, sexuality and disability, to discuss ideas and issues relevant to the construction of 21st century disabled childhoods. Counters the near monolithic story of disability as threat to the presumed goodness of normative childhood by asking: what alternate depictions and narratives of disabled childhood exist and what can they teach us?

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1/​NEW241Y1 and an additional 0.5 Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level course
Exclusion: NEW448H1 (Advanced Special Topics in Disability Studies: Disability and the Child), offered in Fall 2016, Fall 2018 and Fall 2019
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW449H1 - Contemporary Theories in Critical Disability Studies

Hours: 24S

Explores competing conceptions, definitions and practices of disability through a range of critical disability theories, including crip-of-colour critique, decolonial theories of disability studies and black feminist disability frameworks. Enacts disability studies as a justice-oriented methodology or practice that has value for understanding and responding to colonial systems of race, class, gender and disability. Interrogates the shape and limits of disability and disability studies to ask the provocative question: what can disability studies do?

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1 and 0.5 FCE from Equity Studies Core Group: Disability Studies
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW450Y1 - African Studies Honours Research Seminar

Hours: 24S

This honours research seminar required of all specialists and majors in African Studies offers critical explorations of the genealogy of African Studies, the transnational study of Africa, Africa’s place in a globalized world, the historical, intellectual and institutional contexts of Africanist knowledge production, its dissemination and consumption in Africa, Europe, the Americas and emerging academic sites in Asia. It engages with the paradigm shifts and vibrant scholarly and epistemic debates across disciplines and geographies as well as unfolding events, public discourses, geopolitics, African popular cultures and the reimagining of African futures through canonical, emergent scholarship and creative media and emphasizes students’ original and creative research explorations, engaged praxis and search for alternative theorizing and epistemologies.

Prerequisite: NEW150Y1/​NEW250Y1/​400-level Group A Course
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW469Y1 - Decolonizing Research Methodologies for New Researchers

Hours: 48S

A feminist/anti-racist/anti-colonial/anti-imperialist exploration of research methods. Examines the work of researchers and scholar-activists who seek to humanize research with communities detrimentally impacted by colonial, imperialist, heteropatriarchal research agendas and processes. Supports students' independent research projects through guidance from the course instructor. Prepares students for graduate studies or research-oriented careers. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: NEW240H1/​NEW240Y1, 1.0 FCE from Equity Studies Core Group 300+ level courses and a GPA of 3.0 from NEW Equity Studies Core courses.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW497Y1 - Community Based Research as Resistance and Social Change

Hours: 96P/24S

Explores how research is conducted and mobilized by marginalized communities as a form of resistance, knowledge mobilization and social change. Examines the foundations of empirical research, the role of the university as a site of research activity and knowledge production and the ethics and methods of community-based research. Informed by examples of grassroots research projects from Black, Indigenous and racialized communities locally, nationally and globally, students engage in community-based and participatory action research projects. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 9.0 FCE and successful completion of the application process.
Recommended Preparation: NEW120Y1/​ NEW150Y1/​ NEW220H1/​ NEW221H1/​ NEW224Y1/​ NEW225H1/​ NEW226H1/​ NEW232H1/​ NEW232Y1/​ NEW240Y1/​ NEW241Y1/​ NEW270H1/​ HIS230H1/​ HIS231H1/​ other NEW courses
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW498H1 - Community Based Research as Resistance and Social Change

Hours: 48P/12S

Explores how research is conducted and mobilized by marginalized communities as a form of resistance, knowledge mobilization and social change. Examines the foundations of empirical research, the role of the university as a site of research activity and knowledge production and the ethics and methods of community-based research. Informed by examples of grassroots research projects from Black, Indigenous and racialized communities locally, nationally and globally, students engage in community-based and participatory action research projects. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 9.0 FCE and successful completion of the application process.
Recommended Preparation: NEW120Y1/​ NEW150Y1/​ NEW220H1/​ NEW221H1/​ NEW224Y1/​ NEW225H1/​ NEW226H1/​ NEW232H1/​ NEW232Y1/​ NEW240Y1/​ NEW241Y1/​ NEW270H1/​ HIS230H1/​ HIS231H1/​ other NEW courses
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC274H1 - The Turks in History: From Nomads of the Steppe Frontier to Islamic Rulers

Hours: 24L

Explores the roles of Turks as raiders, migrants, slave-soldiers, and empire-builders in the formation of the Islamic world prior to the Ottomans (1300). Readings include primary sources in translation on the Islamization of the Turks in Central Asia and their gradual takeover of Iranian and Arab lands.

Exclusion: NMC274Y1
Recommended Preparation: NMC103H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC358H1 - Gender and Sexuality in Modern Middle Eastern Cultures

Hours: 24L

Examines questions of gender and sexuality in the broader Middle East (Iran, Turkey, and the Arab world) from the colonial period to the present through readings of religious, cultural, historical, and literary texts. Focuses on the development of modern secular and religious feminist thought, cultural representations of gender and sexuality, and critical approaches to theorizing gender and sexuality in the Middle East.

Prerequisite: 3 FCEs in Humanities
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC360H1 - The Archaeology of the Biblical World I: The Bronze Age

Hours: 24L

The archaeology of Syria-Palestine from prehistoric times until the end of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1200 BCE), with a special emphasis on the development of complex society, and inter-relations with the neighboring regions of Egypt and Syro-Mesopotamia. Attention will also be given to the history of archaeological research in the region, current field techniques and methods of archaeological analysis, and the relationship between archaeological evidence and contemporary written records, including the Hebrew Bible. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: 1 FCE in Humanities
Recommended Preparation: NMC102H1 or NMC104H1 or NMC260H1 or NMC262H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC473H1 - Intellectuals of the Modern Arab World

Hours: 24S

The course is designed to re-examine the role of intellectuals in the Arab world and political events that shaped their thinking. It introduces the life and thought of some leading thinkers of the Arab world and relates their thought to the lived experience of political, social, economic and cultural change in the Middle East. Intended for upper year students.

Prerequisite: 1 FCE from NMC278H1, NMC377Y1, NMC378H1
Recommended Preparation: Fluency in reading Arabic
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC484H1 - Gender-related Topics in Jewish Law and Religion

Hours: 36L

Abortion, rape, family violence, age-related issues, and similar topics from the perspective of historical and legal development, scientific theory, socio-ethical attitudes and anthropological comparison in the Bible and other ancient Near Eastern sources, through Jewish legal texts to modern responses.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NMC491H1 - Mesopotamian Material Culture: Art and Artifacts

Hours: 24S

This course focuses on a comprehensive introduction and discussion of Mesopotamian artwork from the Neolithic to the Iron Age periods (ca. 6000 - 300 BCE). Following an introduction of major artifact classes (including sculpture, relief, and glyptics [seals and sealings]), students will learn to describe and catalogue works of Mesopotamian art, allowing them to critically use and evaluate primary and secondary publications. Systematic descriptions and labels for key characteristics such as the object materials, size, iconography, genre, style, and theme will be established to show how meaningful artifact typologies can be constructed. The potential as well as limitations of art-historical approaches for archaeological work, especially for the chronology and interpretation of archeological contexts, will be discussed and examined on selected cases. Several classes will be taught at the Royal Ontario Museum to demonstrate the handling and physical analysis of artifacts.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML320H1 - Aramaic Bible Translations

Hours: 24S

An intensive study of various Targumim to the Pentateuch: Onkelos, Pseudo-Jonathan, Neophyti, Samaritan and Fragment Targumim. Differences among them in vocabulary, syntax and verb usage are discussed, as well as their relationship to the Palestinian midrashim. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: NML220Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML357H1 - Legends of the Jews (Aggadah)

Hours: 24S

An introduction to the exegetical methods of the rabbis in their analysis of biblical texts, with special attention to issues of intertextuality. The textual and thematic topic will vary by year.

Prerequisite: Intermediate Hebrew (Modern or Biblical)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML358H1 - Middle Hebrew: Mishnah and Tosefta

Hours: 24S

Introduction to Mishnah and Tosefta, two of the three foundational documents of Middle Hebrew. In addition to studying specific features of this level of Hebrew, examining these compositions independently, and analyzing their interaction, students will examine current scholarly literature on these documents and their relationship to each other. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: Intermediate Hebrew (Modern or Biblical)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML359Y1 - Babylonian Talmud

Hours: 48S

Selections from a tractate in Babylonian Talmud in order to gain facility in the understanding of the dialogic structure of the legal discussions. Practice in the use of classical commentaries and critical aids to allow independent study of the text.

Prerequisite: Intermediate Hebrew (Modern or Biblical)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NML420Y1 - Jerusalem Talmud

Hours: 48S

The Talmud of the Land of Israel, also called Talmud Yerushalmi or Palestinian Talmud, is written in a mixture of Jewish Western Aramaic and Mishnaic Hebrew. It is the principal document of the Land of Israel in Late Antiquity. The course examines the legal argumentation, terminology and language which differ from those of the Babylonian Talmud. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: NML220Y1/​NML320H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NML452H1 - Halakhic Midrashim

Hours: 24S

This course familiarizes students with the methodology and terminology of the two midrashic systems: Devei R. Akiba and Devei R. Ishmael. Sections of all the midrashic halakha (Mekhiltot, Sifra and Sifre) are studied and compared to other Tannaitic materials.

Prerequisite: Intermediate Hebrew (Modern or Biblical)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML461H1 - Modern Persian Poetry

Hours: 24S

A survey of Persian literature, mainly modern poetry from 19th–21st centuries, focusing on linguistics and literary approaches in modern poetry. The course includes detailed discussion of the influence and effect of western and world poetry on Iranian poets, and critical reflections on works of leading contemporary poets. (Conducted in Persian)

Prerequisite: NML360Y1 or permission of instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML462H1 - Modern Persian Prose

Hours: 24S

A survey of contemporary Persian prose, focusing on fiction, novel and short story. The course includes discussion of main elements of the story such as plot, scene, characters, theme, topic, point of view, etc. and develops the ability to analyze any genres of literary prose through analyzing different Persian short stories. (Conducted in Persian)

Prerequisite: NML360Y1 or permission of instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NML490H1 - Topics in Near and Middle Eastern Languages

Hours: 36S

An advanced language seminar organized around grammatical issues or texts selected by the instructor.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor
Corequisite: N/A
Exclusion: N/A
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

PCJ460H1 - Causes and Consequences of Civil Wars and Violence

Previous Course Number: PCS460H1, UNI460H1

Hours: 24S

This course explores the links between violent conflict and socioeconomic development. It focuses on the macro- and micro-level processes leading to conflict and how conflict and political violence affect people’s lives at the household and community levels. It also examines how these micro-level processes are linked to wider political and economic issues, including governance and institutional development. Tools from economic theory are applied alongside country-specific and cross-national empirical evidence.

Prerequisite: PCJ360H1 and PCJ362H1, or permission of the Program Director; enrolment restricted to students enrolled in Peace, Conflict and Justice Specialist program
Exclusion: PCS460H1, PCS460Y1, UNI460H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCL200H1 - Drugs & the Brain

Hours: 24L

Lectures introduce students to prescribed and illicit drugs that affect the brain. Lectures cover drug pharmacology and explain how drugs alter mood, perception, cognition, and arousal by affecting different aspects of brain function. The societal impact of these prescribed and illicit drugs is also discussed.

Note: This course is not intended for upper year students who have already completed BCH210H1 or other exclusion courses. Upper year Life Science students who are excluded and are interested in this content should look into PCL475H1 and/or PCL476H1 as the more appropriate choice.

Prerequisite: None
Exclusion: PSY396H1, PCL302H1, BCH210H1, BCH242Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL302H1 - Pharmacodynamic Principles

Hours: 36L

Topics include biological action of drugs on membranes, enzymes, receptors, neural and hormonal systems, transmission and modulation.

Prerequisite: (PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Exclusion: PHC300H1, PHC301H1
Recommended Preparation: PCL201H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL470H1 - Systems Pharmacology II

Previous Course Number: PCL470Y1

Hours: 31L/4T

A culmination of pharmacological principles discussing concepts of drug properties and their interactions within the body. The mechanism of action, pharmacological properties including clinical use and adverse effects of drugs acting on the central nervous systems and immunological system; antimicrobial and cancer chemotherapeutic agents as well as the potential therapeutic use of endogenous/herbal compounds will be examined. Critical evaluation of primary literature and examination of clinical problem-based case studies will be integrated with lecture material through small group sessions.

Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, (PSL300H1, PSL301H1), a minimum of 14 FCE or Permission of the Department.
Exclusion: PCL470Y1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL475H1 - Neuropsychopharmacology 1

Previous Course Number: PCL475Y1

Hours: 36L/12T

Students will explore the major CNS neurological syndromes, examples include pain, epilepsy, the sleep-wake cycle and relate neurological abnormalities. Lectures will discuss major classes of drugs used to mitigate and treat these disorder, their mechanisms of action, clinical use and unwanted effects. This course was previously offered as PCL475Y1.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 9.0 FCE
Exclusion: PCL475Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL476H1 - Neuropsychopharmacology 2

Previous Course Number: PCL475Y1

Hours: 36L/12T

Students will explore the major CNS neurological syndromes which may include anxiety, schizophrenia and depression/mania and their relate neurological abnormalities. Lectures will discuss major classes of drugs used to mitigate and treat these disorders, their mechanisms of action, clinical use and unwanted effects.

Prerequisite: Completion of at least 9.0 FCE, and PCL475H1 (or Permission of the Department)
Exclusion: PCL475Y1; PSY396H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL482H1 - Biomedical Toxicology

Previous Course Number: PCL473Y1

Hours: 24L

This course explores several contemporary topics in biomedical toxicology with emphasis on how chemicals affect human health. Lectures cover principles of toxicology, the mechanisms of toxicity of a wide variety of toxic agents and the associated toxicities, methodologies used to examine chemical toxicities, risk assessment, and the applications of toxicology.

Prerequisite: (PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PCL362H1), a minimum of 14 FCE or Permission of Department.
Exclusion: PCL473Y1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1 + BCH311H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL490H1 - Advanced Topics in Pharmacology and Toxicology

Hours: 12L/12S

An opportunity to expand on innovative and unique topics in Pharmacology and Toxicology that are not already extensively addressed. The course will reveal the dynamic nature of the field and the diverse interests of our faculty. Students will be introduced to leading edge topics and research within the discipline of Pharmacology and Toxicology.

Prerequisite: PCL302H1, and one of STA288H1/​STA220H1/​PCL376H1, a minimum of 14.0 FCE or Permission of the Department
Recommended Preparation: PCL469H1/​PCL470H1/​PCL482H1/​PCL483H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PHL199H1 - Ethics and Fiction

Hours: 24S

The goal of this seminar is to investigate ethical questions via works of fiction, primarily novels. The idea is not to see fiction as a pedantic vehicle for ethical argument, but rather to consider how, and with what effect, fiction functions as an ethical medium. We will not judge characters as ‘likeable’ or ‘relatable’; rather, we will reflect on what fiction can teach us about the pressing challenges of choice and responsibility, and how it can (perhaps) enhance empathy.

The focus is on issues of individual identity and integrity: creating and maintaining oneself as a moral whole within environments hostile or indifferent to that end. All the works considered are novels or plays from the period between about 1900 and 2020—for convenience, the ‘modern’ and ‘postmodern’ ages, though we will query those notions. A running theme in the chosen readings is what is usually called ‘existential’ philosophy, but we will query the validity of that label as well. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL245H1 - Modern Symbolic Logic

Hours: 36L

An introduction to formal deductive logic. Semantics, symbolization, and techniques of natural deduction in sentential logic. Symbolization, natural deduction, and models in monadic predicate logic. Symbolization and natural deduction with polyadic predicates. Introduction to advanced concepts in first-order logic, such as operations, identity, and models.

Exclusion: PHLB50H3, PHL245H5
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL339H1 - Topics in South Asian Philosophy

Hours: 36L

An intermediate level study of one or more topics in South Asian Philosophy.

Prerequisite: 7.5 FCE (in any field) with at least 1.5 FCE in philosophy
Recommended Preparation: PHL239H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL345H1 - Intermediate Logic

Hours: 36L

A continuation of PHL245H1, requiring no other prior knowledge of philosophy or mathematics. First-order logic, including basic metalogical results such as soundness and completeness. An introduction to basic set theory and metalogic. Topics may include the Loewenheim-Skolem theorems for first-order logic, Goedel’s incompleteness theorems.

Prerequisite: PHL245H1/​MAT157Y1 and a full course in PHL/CSC/MAT
Exclusion: PHLC51H3, PHL345H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL347H1 - Modal Logic and Philosophical Applications of Logic

Hours: 36L

Formal study of the concepts of necessity and possibility, modal, propositional and quantificational logic, possible-worlds semantics, and the metaphysics of modality. Other topics may include counterfactuals, truth, vagueness, epistemic logic, temporal logic, or non-classical logic.

Prerequisite: PHL245H1/​MAT157Y1 and a full course in PHL/CSC/MAT
Exclusion: PHL347H5
Recommended Preparation: PHL345H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL418H1 - Seminar in South Asian Philosophy

Hours: 36S

Advanced study of one or more topics in South Asian Philosophy.

Prerequisite: 4.0 FCEs in PHL, or permission of the instructor
Recommended Preparation: PHL339H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL451H1 - Seminar in Philosophy of Language

Hours: 36S

Advanced study of some topic in the philosophy of language.

Prerequisite: PHL245H1/​MAT157Y1 and one of PHL232H1/​PHL233H1/​PHL240H1/​PHL246H1, 4.0 credits in philosophy
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

PHY424H1 - Advanced Physics Laboratory

Hours: 72P

Experiments in this course are designed to form a bridge to current experimental research. A wide range of exciting experiments relevant to modern research in physics is available. The laboratory is open from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., Monday to Friday.

Prerequisite: PHY250H1, PHY256H1, PHY324H1
Exclusion: PHY326H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

PHY485H1 - Laser Physics

Hours: 24L

This course, which is intended to be an introduction to research in optical sciences, covers the statistics of optical fields and the physics of lasers. Topics include the principles of laser action, laser cavities, properties of laser radiation and its propagation, the diffraction of light, and spatial and temporal coherence.

Prerequisite: PHY350H1, PHY358H1, PHY385H1/​ECE318H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

PHY492H1 - Advanced Atmospheric Physics

Hours: 24L/12T

A preparatory course for research in experimental and theoretical atmospheric physics. Content will vary from year to year. Themes may include techniques for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere and surface; theoretical atmosphere-ocean dynamics; the physics of clouds, precipitation, and convection in the Earth's atmosphere.

Prerequisite: PHY250H1, MAT235Y1/​MAT237Y1/​MAT257Y1
Exclusion: PHY498H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

POL402H1 - Problems in the Political Thought of the Socratic School

Previous Course Number: POL402Y1

Hours: 24S

Study of a small number of texts illuminating the origins and/or legacy of Socratic political philosophy.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Exclusion: POL402Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL403Y1 - Problems in the Political Thought of the Socratic School

Hours: 24S

Study of a small number of texts illuminating the origins and/or legacy of Socratic political philosophy.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Exclusion: POL402H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL421H1 - Maimonides and His Modern Interpreters

Hours: 24S

The course offers an introduction to the seminal work of Jewish philosophy, 'The Guide of the Perplexed' by Moses Maimonides. We will delve into some of the basic themes of Jewish philosophical theology and religion as they are treated by Maimonides.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Exclusion: RLG433H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL430Y1 - Comparative Studies in Jewish and Non-Jewish Political Thought

Hours: 48S

A comparative examination of major texts of the Jewish tradition, ranging from the Torah to modernity, and texts of the classical or Western traditions raising similar questions. Close reading of a small number of capital works, with special attention to the problem of reason and revelation.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL432H1 - Feminist Theory: Challenges to Legal and Political Thought

Hours: 24S

Feminist theory offers basic challenges to the foundations of modern political and legal thought. It suggests a different conception of human nature and a different model of epistemology and of appropriate forms of argument about the traditional issues of legal and political theory: justice, power, equality and freedom. Introduction to the foundations of feminist theory, an analysis of its implications for traditional liberal theory, and an application of feminist theory to law.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL434H1 - Enlightenment and its Critics

Previous Course Number: POL434Y1

Hours: 24S

This course explores, through the writings of its foremost advocates and adversaries, the Enlightenment, the movement to found political life on the principles of scientific reason, universally applicable and accessible to human beings.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Exclusion: POL434Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL446H1 - 20th-Century Political Thought

Hours: 24S

The goal of this course is to introduce students to some of the themes and approaches of critical theory (power, subjectivity, ideology, and hegemony).

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL457Y1 - Markets, Justice and the Human Good

Hours: 48S

The course offers a philosophical perspective on the advantages and disadvantages of markets as ways of organizing economic activity. It asks in what ways markets and market-like arrangements can contribute to or create obstacles to the achievement of justice and human well-being.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL460H1 - Studies in Modern Political Theory

Hours: 24S

Studies on a modern political thinker or thinkers since Machiavelli.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL461H1 - Studies in Civic Republicanism

Hours: 24S

The course focuses on texts in the history of political thought drawn from the tradition of civic republicanism. The texts treated vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

POL469H1 - Ethics and International Relations

Hours: 24S

The course aims to explore the requirements of justice and fairness in international affairs. It is common to theorize international relations in terms of interests and power. But even the most cursory look at what important actors actually do in their international interactions reveals that they use normative language all the time. This has not gone unnoticed, with investigations of ethics in the international arena multiplying in recent years. Drawing on readings from political philosophy, legal theory, and normative international relations theory, the course will take up practical ethical dilemmas encountered in world affairs. The main focus of the course will be on institutions. Examples will be drawn from the issue areas of trade, health, and the environment, among others.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)/POL208Y1/​POL208Y5/(POLB80H3, POLB81H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL480H1 - Studies in Comparative Political Theory

Hours: 36S

We will critically examine what “comparative political theory” is and what it would mean to genuinely “deparochialize” political theory, that is, to de-center Euro-American thought in the study of political ideas. The course neither presupposes background knowledge of any non-Western thought tradition, nor does it aspire to provide students with sufficient knowledge of particular traditions to ground serious scholarly contributions to this emerging field. To provide that background would require a series of specialized courses in, e.g., East Asian political thought, Indian political thought, Latin American political thought, Indigenous political thought, African political thought, and so on. Rather, the course aims at sharpening our understanding of (a) the purposes served by “deparochializing” political theory; and (b) the various methods by which we can seek to serve these purposes.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL484H1 - Topics in Political Thought I

Hours: 24S

A seminar on a central problem in political thought. It proceeds through the reading of a small number of major texts. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL484Y1 - Topics in Political Thought I

Hours: 48S

A seminar on a central problem in political thought. It proceeds through the reading of a small number of major texts. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL485H1 - Topics in Political Thought II

Hours: 24S

A seminar on a central problem in political thought. It proceeds through the reading of a small number of major texts. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL485Y1 - Topics in Political Thought II

Hours: 48S

A seminar on a central problem in political thought. It proceeds through the reading of a small number of major texts. Content in any given year depends on instructor.

Prerequisite: POL200Y1/​POL200Y5/(POLC70H3, POLC71H3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PRT100Y1 - Portuguese for Beginners

Hours: 48L/48T

An intensive basic course in spoken and written Portuguese for students who have no knowledge of this language or advanced Spanish. It aims to give students a basic knowledge of reading, listening, spoken and written skills in a dynamic and communicative way. Presentation of cultural aspects of the Portuguese-speaking world.

Prerequisite: No previous knowledge of Portuguese or advanced Spanish.
Exclusion: PRT110Y1, PRT120Y1, PRT219Y1, PRT220Y1, PRT320Y1, PRT420H1, PRT420Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

PRT120Y1 - Portuguese for Spanish Speakers

Hours: 48L/24T

Introduction to the Portuguese language for speakers of Spanish. Development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills with an emphasis on communication, and an overview of basic grammatical structures and building of vocabulary. Presentation of cultural aspects of the Portuguese-speaking world.

Prerequisite: Native or advanced knowledge of Spanish (min. SPA320Y1 for non-native speakers of Spanish); no previous knowledge of Portuguese.
Exclusion: PRT100Y1, PRT110Y1, PRT220Y1, PRT320Y1, PRT420Y1, PRT420H1, PRT219Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

PRT320Y1 - Advanced Portuguese

Hours: 48L/24T

Intensive practice in written and oral Portuguese for the advanced student. Selective review of grammar with emphasis on complex language structures.

Prerequisite: PRT120Y1, PRT220Y1 or placement test
Exclusion: PRT219Y1, PRT420H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

PSL201Y1 - Basic Human Physiology

Hours: 44L/24P

A survey course covering all organ systems intended for students who are not proceeding further in Physiology.

Exclusion: Any 300-level PSL course taken previously or concurrently
Recommended Preparation: 100-level course in BIO or equivalent
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PSY201H1 - Statistics I

Hours: 36L

Fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics, including population and sampling distributions, simple association, probability, estimation, and hypothesis testing.

Prerequisite: PSY100H1
Exclusion: ECO220Y1/​EEB225H1/​GGR270H1/​POL222H1/​SOC202H1/​STA220H1/​STA248H1/​STA288H1
Recommended Preparation: Grade 12 Calculus
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

PSY203H1 - Psychological Research

Hours: 36P

This course provides an introduction to conceiving, designing, and conducting research in psychology. It prepares students to be both consumers and producers of scientific research, and also addresses basic issues related to the work of psychological scientists such as theory development, research ethics, and scientific writing. Students in this course will gain insight into the scientific process as a whole – its advantages, difficulties, and limitations. As such, students will be able to better evaluate the knowledge that psychological science can provide, and integrate that knowledge into a broader worldview.

Prerequisite: PSY100H1
Corequisite: PSY201H1 (or exclusion)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PSY260H1 - Learning and Plasticity

Hours: 36L

Concepts, theories, and applications of classical and contemporary learning theories, including classical and operant conditioning. Current theories of the physiological and anatomical basis of learning and memory, including synaptic plasticity, the role of the hippocampus, amygdala, frontal cortex and other brain regions. Theories will be related to a practical understanding and applications such as drug addiction, phobias and other disorders.

Prerequisite: PSY100H1/​COG250Y1, OR registered in the Cognitive Science program
Exclusion: PSYB38H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PSY305H1 - The Treatment of Psychological Data

Hours: 36L

This course provides a practical yet intensive introduction to the research pipeline, with a focus on research data management and advanced statistical analysis and inference. Students learn how to find, organize, and analyze data sets in a transparent and reproducible way. Students also learn more about statistical inference, focusing on how the design and analysis of data shape the interpretation of results.

Prerequisite: PSY202H1 (or exclusion)
Exclusion: EEB313H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

PSY330H1 - Psychological Measurement

Hours: 36L

This course focuses on the development and evaluation of psychological measures, including the measurement of knowledge, abilities, attitudes, and personality traits. We will discuss theoretical and methodological issues in psychological measurement, covering important concepts such as reliability and validity and how these affect the interpretation of test scores and research findings. There will be some discussion of the application of psychological measures to various settings and the ethics of psychological assessment.

Prerequisite: PSY201H1 (or exclusion)
Exclusion: PSYC37H3
Recommended Preparation: PSY202H1 (or exclusion), PSY230H1
Distribution Requirements: Science

PSY396H1 - Neurochemical Basis of Behaviour

Hours: 36L

The functional relevance of neurotransmitters, with particular emphasis on their role in mediating behaviour.

Prerequisite: PSY201H1 (or exclusion), PSY290H1/​HMB200H1
Exclusion: PCL200H1/​PCL476H1/​PSYC62H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PSY425H1 - Self-Consciousness

Hours: 36L

The distinguishing feature of our species is the reflexivity of our consciousness -- the ability to conceive of and interpret ourselves and our experiences. For us, consciousness involves self-consciousness. All our higher symbolic capabilities rest upon this foundation. The aim of this lecture course is to trace out a variety of frames through which we can examine and understand the shared aspects of our subjectivity as self-conscious agents. Using a multidisciplinary approach that draws together ideas and insights from psychology, sociology, philosophy, anthropology, and biology, the course is designed to foster articulacy and critical acumen in how we think about reflexive experience.

Prerequisite: PSY201H1 (or exclusion), PSY220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

RLG213H1 - Embarrassment of Scriptures

Hours: 24L/12T

Surveys interpretative traditions related to sacred texts, focusing on reading strategies that range from the literal to the figurative with attention to rationales that transform literal textual meanings and copyists manipulations of texts. May focus on various religious traditions from year to year, targeting a single canonical tradition or comparative analysis. Students will gain insight into literalist, environmentalist, secularist and erotic approaches to texts. Prior exposure to the study of religion is not required; all readings will be in English.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

RLG261H1 - Introduction to Tibetan I

Previous Course Number: RLG261Y1

Hours: 48L

An introduction to Classical Tibetan language for beginners. Development of basic grammar and vocabulary, with readings of simple texts. Two sections of the course may be offered: an on-campus class meeting and an online section. The final exam will require attendance on the St. George campus, or in another authorized exam centre.

Exclusion: RLG261Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

RLG262H1 - Introduction to Tibetan II

Previous Course Number: RLG261Y1

Hours: 48L

The second semester of an introduction to Classical Tibetan language course for beginners. Continued work on grammar and vocabulary, advancing to reading texts. Two sections of the course may be offered: an on-campus class meeting and an online section. The final exam will require attendance on the St. George campus, or in another authorized exam centre.

Prerequisite: RLG261H1
Exclusion: RLG261Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

RLG264H1 - Introductory Pali I

Hours: 36L

This course offers an opportunity to students interested in Buddhism to read, analyze, and discuss select simple passages from the scriptures of the Theravada canon in their original language. It will cover philosophical, psychological, and narrative texts and their interpretation, as well as provide a first exposure to the Pali Language.

Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: None
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

RLG265H1 - Introductory Pali II

Hours: 24L/12T

This course offers an opportunity to students interested in Buddhism and with basic knowledge of Pali to read, analyze, and discuss select simple passages from the scriptures of the Theravada canon in their original language. It will cover philosophical, psychological, and narrative texts and their interpretation.

Prerequisite: RLG264H1 or equivalent capacity to read Pali texts in the original
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: None
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

RLG308H1 - Migration, Religion and City Spaces

Hours: 24L

Immigrants have transformed cities through religious practices. Explore how transnational migration has affected religious diversity and vitality in metropolitan areas. Through discussion, site visits and analysis, students will examine the ways that immigrants use religion to make home, challenges around the establishment of new religious structures, and policy designed to accommodate new religious practices and communities.

Prerequisite: 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

RLG336H1 - Religion and its Monsters

Hours: 24L

A course looking at the theories about and responses to the monstrous in global religious traditions and practices.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

RSM219H1 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

Hours: 24L/24T

Basic introduction to financial reporting and analysis. Emphasis is on decision-making and interpretation of financial statements and how they can be used to plan a firm’s overall business activities through the use of real-world companies. Coverage includes the use of accounting information to prepare a basic set of financial statements. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Note: This course is normally taken in first year.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science

RSM222H1 - Management Accounting I

Hours: 24L/24T

Covers the conceptual and analytical foundations of management accounting and the applications of cost accounting information. Costing and control concepts are analyzed to equip students with tools for establishing costing systems, making business decisions, and evaluating management performance. Materials are designed to help students understand strategic cost management principles. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: RSM219H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

RSM230H1 - Financial Markets

Hours: 24L

Introduction to Canadian and international financial markets. This course provides an overview of the major financial institutions, financial markets, financial securities, and an introduction to valuation and trading of securities. Securities discussed include stocks and bonds, as well as some content on derivatives. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Note: This course is normally taken in first year.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

RSM250H1 - Principles of Marketing

Hours: 24L

Students receive an introduction to the basic concepts, theories, and methods of contemporary marketing. The course offers a comprehensive framework to develop successful marketing efforts and allows students to create a marketing plan. Specific topics examined: market research, consumer behaviour, segmentation, product policy, pricing, distribution, communications, sales, and direct marketing. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Note: This course is normally taken in first year.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

RSM332H1 - Capital Market Theory

Hours: 24L

An introduction to capital market theory explaining how financial securities are priced. Topics covered include the time and risk value of money, the use of discounted cash flow techniques, efficient set theory, asset pricing and market efficiency. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: RSM230H1
Corequisite: ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ECO227Y1/​(STA220H1, STA255H1)/(STA237H1, STA238H1)/(STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ACT349H1, ECO358H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

RSM336H1 - Investments

Previous Course Number: RSM330H1

Hours: 24L

This course provides an introduction to financial theories and analytical tools for making investment decisions and for understanding how prices are determined for stocks and bonds. The course covers a broad range of topics including asset allocation, technical analysis, fundamental analysis, anomalies, and bond portfolio management. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: RSM230H1, RSM332H1
Corequisite: ECO220Y1/​ECO227Y1/​(STA220H1, STA255H1)/(STA237H1, STA238H1)/(STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ACT349H1, RSM330H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

RSM341H1 - Model-Based Decision Making

Hours: 24L

This course aims to introduce logically disciplined approaches to decision making under uncertainty. Managers are continually barraged with information that may be unreliable. They must choose courses of action in the face of many uncertainties. How can we define and assess the "optimality" of their decisions in a consistent manner? By building upon the answers to these questions, the course will consider the problem of rational choice when the outcome is determined by the actions of, and interactions between, multiple individuals. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: Completion of 10.0 FCEs; ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ECO227Y1/​(STA220H1, STA255H1)/(STA237H1, STA238H1)/(STA257H1, STA261H1)
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

RSM352H1 - Marketing Research

Hours: 24L

Marketing research is studied from the perspective of the marketing manager. The course focuses on the initiation, design, and interpretation of research as an aid to marketing decision making. Case studies and projects are used to provide students with some practical research experiences. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: ECO220Y1/​ECO227Y1/​(STA220H1, STA255H1)/(STA237H1, STA238H1)/(STA257H1, STA261H1)
Corequisite: RSM251H1/​RSM350H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

RSM353H1 - Consumer Behaviour

Hours: 24L

Formulating successful marketing strategies requires an understanding of consumers’ cultures, motivations, cognitions, and emotions. Students will learn how to use theoretical perspectives from psychology, economics, anthropology, and other disciplines to generate predictions about consumers, interpret consumer reactions to marketing stimuli, and develop rigorous skills in marketing analysis. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Corequisite: RSM251H1/​RSM350H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

RSM361H1 - Human Resource Management

Previous Course Number: RSM460H1

Hours: 24L

Human resource management is studied from the perspective of the manager/practitioner. The course focuses on decisions about when and whom to hire, how much to pay, what training to offer, and how to evaluate employees. Class exercises and projects are used to provide students with some practical experience with these topics. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: RSM260H1
Exclusion: RSM460H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

RSM394H1 - Social Entrepreneurship

Previous Course Number: RSM318H1

Hours: 24L

In this course, students will learn how entrepreneurs create organizations that address social problems using innovative, sustainable approaches. Students will examine a variety of social venture forms and consider how such ventures can be evaluated, managed, and financed. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: Completion of 10.0 FCEs
Exclusion: RSM318H1 (Special Topics in Management: Social Entrepreneurship), offered in Winter 2018; RSM318H1 (Special Topics in Management: Entrepreneurship for Social Ventures), offered in Winter 2015 and Winter 2016
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

RSM422H1 - Management Control

Hours: 24L/12T

This course considers the processes and systems, many accounting-based, by which key managers allegedly ensure that resources are acquired and used effectively and efficiently in the accomplishment of an organization’s goals. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: RSM222H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

RSM426H1 - Critical Thinking, Analysis and Decision Making

Hours: 24L/12T

This is a capstone case course stressing the pervasive competencies and critical thinking skills required from Rotman Commerce graduates, professional accountants and advisors. The course integrates the technical and practical knowledge obtained in previous courses by applying this knowledge to case type situations. Aimed at students seeking an accounting designation. Enrolment is restricted to 4th year Rotman Commerce students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: RSM222H1, RSM323H1, RSM324H1
Corequisite: RSM321H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

RSM456H1 - Big Data and Marketing Analytics

Previous Course Number: RSM411H1

Hours: 24L

The course is designed to introduce students to tools used in marketing analytics. Companies have been collecting vast databases to aid them in making sound marketing decisions. Examples include retail scanner panel data which keeps track of customers’ purchase histories, loyalty-program data monitoring purchasing under different promotional environments, social network and online shopping history data. The course uses several marketing data sources to illustrate how to use statistical marketing models to evaluate the impacts of marketing-mix, and manage customer lifetime value. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: ECO220Y1/​ECO227Y1/​(STA220H1, STA255H1)/(STA237H1, STA238H1)/(STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: RSM411H1 (Special Topics in Management: Marketing Data, Models and Decisions), offered in Winter 2011, Winter 2012, Winter 2013, and Fall 2014
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

RSM470H1 - Management Science Modeling with Spreadsheets

Hours: 24L

The course presents quantitative methods of modeling business and other systems in order to objectively evaluate available alternatives and select the ‘best’ one with respect to pre-defined criteria. Topics include: Decision Analysis, Linear Programming, Integer Programming, Network Methods, Simulation and Waiting Line Models. Enrolment is restricted to 3rd and 4th year Rotman Commerce students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: ECO220Y1/​ECO227Y1/​(STA220H1,STA255H1)/(STA237H1, STA238H1)/(STA257H1,STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

RSM481H1 - Outsourcing and the Organization of Firms

Hours: 24L

Explores the issue of outsourcing, broadly defined: which activities should a firm do “in house” and which should it take outside? Using a combination of cases and economic analysis, it develops a framework for determining the “best” organizational structure. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ECO227Y1/​(STA220H1, STA255H1)/(STA237H1, STA238H1)/(STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

RSM483H1 - Real Estate Markets

Hours: 24L

This course uses economic methods to analyze real estate markets. Topics covered include the determinants of real estate values, the location decisions of households and firms, land use, urban growth and agglomeration, behavioural real estate economics and real options. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ECO227Y1/​(STA220H1, STA255H1)/(STA237H1, STA238H1)/(STA257H1, STA261H1), RSM332H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

RSM484H1 - Real Estate Finance and Investment

Previous Course Number: RSM380H1

Hours: 24L

Real estate assets account for about one-third of the value of all capital assets in the world. This course provides an understanding of real estate investment, valuation and liabilities along with the public policy associated with home ownership, using modern finance and economic tools. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.

Prerequisite: ECO204Y1/​ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ECO227Y1/​(STA220H1, STA255H1)/(STA237H1, STA238H1)/(STA257H1, STA261H1), RSM332H1
Corequisite: RSM333H1
Exclusion: RSM380H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS345H1 - Sex and the Epidemic: Social Work, HIV, and Human Sexuality

Previous Course Number: UNI345H1

Hours: 36L

HIV has forever changed the way human beings understand sexuality. Through a social justice lens, this course examines the nature of community norms, laws, popular media, and the academy to explore how the epidemic has impacted the provision of social services in relation to the diversity of human sexuality.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI345H1
Recommended Preparation: JSU237H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS346H1 - Feminist and Queer Approaches to Technology

Previous Course Number: UNI346H1

Hours: 24L

What do electronic technologies mean for feminist and queer identity, activism, sociability, art, and politics? This course considers a range of critical pressure points central to digital studies, including social networking, participatory media, digital archives, databases, new media activism, performance, embodiment, and representations of race, gender, and sexuality in electronic contexts.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI346H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

SDS355H1 - Theories of Sexuality

Previous Course Number: UNI355H1

Hours: 24L

This course introduces students to key theories of sexuality and sexual diversity. The main goal is to create a framework for understanding sexuality at its intersections with race, gender, class, disability, citizenship status, and geography among other social relations and processes at an advanced level. Closely tracing sexuality’s intersections, course readings will draw upon critical race theory, postcolonial critique and decolonizing movements, women of colour feminisms, trans studies, and transnational sexuality and gender studies.

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits
Exclusion: UNI355H1
Recommended Preparation: Some coursework in intersectionality of gender or sexuality
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS365H1 - Sexuality and Law

Previous Course Number: UNI365H1

Hours: 24L

The course explores the legal regulation of sexuality. How does law understand, constitute and regulate sex, sexuality and sexual diversity? It will consider the role of different types of regulation, including criminal law, family law and constitutional law, and explore issues ranging from sex work and pornography to same sex marriage to transgender discrimination.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI365H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS375H1 - Special Topics in Sexual Diversity Studies A

Previous Course Number: UNI375H1

Hours: 24L

Topics vary from year to year depending on instructor. This seminar is intended to expose students in the Sexual Diversity Studies program to topics that may not be covered by permanent university courses.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI375H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

SDS376H1 - Special Topics in Sexual Diversity Studies B

Previous Course Number: UNI376H1

Hours: 24L

Topics vary from year to year depending on instructor. This seminar is intended to expose students in the Sexual Diversity Studies program to topics that may not be covered by permanent university courses.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI376H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

SDS377H1 - Lesbian Studies: Identity/Theory/Culture

Previous Course Number: UNI377H1

Hours: 24L

This multidisciplinary course examines multiple lesbian identities that have varied in time and place. The course will pose such questions as: What does lesbian mean? Why have changes occurred in meaning? How has the identity of lesbian been culturally represented and politically expressed in various social and political contexts? It will also take up contemporary theoretical, cultural, and political understandings of lesbianism.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI377H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS378H1 - Queer Youth Studies in Education

Previous Course Number: UNI378H1

Hours: 24L

Experiences of queer youth are explored in various education settings through academic research, personal essays, and visual and performing arts to investigate how queer youth define themselves, what they are learning, the curriculum and pedagogy used in the learning process and the possibilities of said learning for social change, individual and community well-being.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI378H1; UNI376H1 (2013-2014 session)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS380H1 - Sexual Diversity in Transnational Perspective

Hours: 24L

An exploration of LGBTQ rights and changes in social and cultural responses to sexual diversity in varied regional, national, and cultural contexts, potentially including Africa, Latin America, South and East Asia, and Eastern Europe. The role of transnational linkages and networks will also be considered in effecting change.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS382H1 - Intro to Queer of Colour Critique

Hours: 24L

This course provides an introduction to the intersections between race, gender and sexuality through an exploration of the political theories, activisms and cultural forms of LGBTQ people of colour. It examines the emergence of queer of colour theory and critiques, and the ways in which the intersections of race, gender and sexuality figure in national, global, economic, & cultural structures.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS
Exclusion: SDS376H1 (Special Topics in Sexual Diversity Studies B: Intro to Queer of Colour Critique), offered in Winter 2017
Distribution Requirements: Social Science; Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

SDS385H1 - Queer Indigenous Politics and Cultures

Hours: 24L

This upper level course introduces students to questions of gender, sexuality, two-spirit, and same-sex desire at the intersections of race, indigeneity, and the violences of settler colonialism. Students will engage with work by scholars, activists, and artists in the fields of indigenous and queer studies, decolonizing activism, and cultural production.

Prerequisite: 0.5 credit in SDS/INS
Exclusion: SDS375H1 (Special Topics in Sexual Diversity Studies A: Indigeneity & Sexuality), offered in Winter 2019
Recommended Preparation: Some coursework in indigenous culture and history in Canada/US
Distribution Requirements: Social Science; Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS425H1 - Sexuality & Health

Hours: 24S

How is the idea of “ethics” understood and deployed in research on sexuality and health? What are the ways that discourses of “risk,” “precarity,” and “cure” become regulative frameworks? How do racialization, colonialism and nation-­building participate in the biopolitics of sexuality and health? With these questions in mind, this interdisciplinary course will discuss various scholarly and activist literatures, including Youth Studies, Critical Disability Studies, Environmental Justice scholarship, Sex Education and Public Health Research, Critical Development Studies, and Queer and Feminist Studies to explore the cultural, social and political dimensions of ethics, health, and sexuality historically, and at the present moment.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in SDS/HST
Exclusion: SDS375H1 (Special Topics in Sexual Diversity Studies A: Sexuality & Health), offered in Winter 2018; SDS455H1 (Special Topics in Sexual Diversity Studies: Sexuality & Health), offered in Winter 2019
Recommended Preparation: Some coursework in health, disability studies, and equity studies
Distribution Requirements: Social Science; Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS455H1 - Special Topics in Sexual Diversity Studies

Previous Course Number: UNI455H1

Hours: 24S

Topics vary from year to year depending on instructor. This seminar is intended to expose students in the Sexual Diversity Studies program to topics that may not be covered by permanent university courses.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI455H1
Recommended Preparation: Coursework in SDS at the 300 level or higher
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

SDS460Y1 - Advanced Research in Sexual Diversity Studies

Previous Course Number: UNI460H1

Hours: 24S

A capstone for majors and specialists who will work closely with SDS faculty in developing their own research project while participating in this seminar and learning about key debates, methodologies, and ethical issues in conducting research in SDS. Students will learn to write proposals, ethics reviews, grants and other relevant documents. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credits in SDS, 0.5 of which needs to be a 300+ level SDS course
Exclusion: UNI460H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS465H1 - Queer Migrations and Refugee Politics

Hours: 24S

This interdisciplinary course will explore the politics of migration and border-crossing from queer, feminist, and trans perspectives. Drawing upon contemporary North American and transnational research, students will engage with critical literatures on citizenship and the state, mobility, belonging, and kinship and how these processes intersect with sexuality in the context of immigration and refugee systems.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in SDS/DTS
Exclusion: SDS455H1 (Special Topics in Sexual Diversity Studies: Queer Migrations and Refugee Politics), offered in Fall 2018
Recommended Preparation: Some coursework in migration & diaspora studies, or transnationalism
Distribution Requirements: Social Science; Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SDS470H1 - Sexual Representations: Critical Approaches in Porn Studies

Previous Course Number: UNI470H1

Hours: 24S

This course is a critical study of the historical, aesthetic, and cultural formation of the concept of pornography. The course explores the relationship between sexual representation and sex work; works through debates about artistic merit and censorship and how they relate to larger issues of power, capitalism, and technology; and theorizes the relationship between sex and commerce. Readings will include work from feminist, queer, people of colour, and trans theorists in the cutting-edge field of porn studies.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI470H1; UNI475H1, Special Topics: Porn Studies
Recommended Preparation: SDS365H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

SDS478H1 - Queer Musics

Previous Course Number: UNI478H1

Hours: 24S

This course explores, through queer of colour critique, feminist and queer theories, how sexuality, gender, and race are performed and heard in several popular music styles/genres. Sampling the field with readings, music videos and audio recordings, we examine sexuality, gender and race in music performance and reception currently and historically.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in SDS
Exclusion: UNI478H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

SDS485H1 - Advanced Seminar in Queer Studies

Hours: 24S

This course will provide an advanced exploration of the historical and contemporary formations and debates of queer studies. This seminar is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation at a particularly advanced level. The specific theme of the seminar changes per year. Please see the department website for details.

Prerequisite: 4.0 credits
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SLA199H1 - Invisible Kingdom, Imaginary Space

Hours: 24S

The Central European Region of Galicia gave rise to a remarkable array of literary representations -- Austrian, Jewish, Polish, and Ukrainian -- animating fantastic creatures, powerful myths, deviant pleasures, and sublime stories. Bruno Schulz created shimmering peacocks, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch seized ecstasy through pain, and Ivan Franko investigated the effects of avarice and social decay.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

SMC155H1 - SMC One: The McLuhan Seminar in Creativity and Technology

Hours: 12L/12S

This seminar is an interdisciplinary exploration of the relationship between creativity and technology. Inspired by the innovative thinking of Marshall McLuhan, it explores how the humanities relate to other fields of thought and research in addressing the individual, social and cultural experiences and effects of technological innovation. This course includes a mandatory travel component opportunity to Silicon Valley, California. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (An ancillary fee of $1,000 is required to help cover some of the travel costs.)

Prerequisite: Admission to SMC One
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, Trinity One, Vic One, UC One, Woodsworth One, SMC165H1, SMC188H1, SMC189H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

SMC165H1 - SMC One: The Boyle Seminar in Scripts and Stories

Hours: 24L/12S

This seminar introduces students to university-level studies through an interdisciplinary exploration of Celtic influences in the mediaeval world, with a particular focus on early books and historical artifacts as physical objects and bearers of meaning. Students will learn how to read and analyse these books and artifacts to decode their meanings, and, in support of that, take introductory language instruction in Latin or Irish. Subjects discussed will include intercultural encounter and dialogue, research methods with historical sources, and the relationship between the written word and lived experience, then and now. There is a co-curricular travel opportunity to Dublin, Ireland associated with this course which takes place following the Winter term exam period. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (If you choose to go on the trip to Ireland, an ancillary fee of $1,000 is required to help cover some of the travel costs.)

Prerequisite: Admission to SMC One
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, Trinity One, Vic One, UC One, Woodsworth One, SMC155H1, SMC188H1, SMC189H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

SMC189H1 - SMC One: The Gilson Seminar in Faith and Rome

Previous Course Number: SMC188Y1

Hours: 24L

This course provides an intensive international learning experience in Rome, Italy. It offers contemporary and historical models of integrating faith with reason, and religious practice with intellectual, creative, and public engagement, specifically the roles that the Catholic Church and Vatican play in Rome, in ecology, science, literature, and public life. This course includes a mandatory travel component to Rome, Italy, which takes place following the Winter term exam period. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (An ancillary fee of $2,000 is required to help cover some of the travel costs.)

Prerequisite: SMC188H1
Exclusion: Innis One, Munk One, New One, Trinity One, Vic One, UC One, Woodsworth One, SMC155H1, SMC165H1, SMC188Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

SMC195H1 - God and Money in the Middle Ages

Hours: 24S

This seminar considers the ethical, political, and spiritual questions arising from the existence of wealth and poverty in medieval European culture. With readings from Dante, Chaucer, Thomas Aquinas and others, the course will examine how the interaction of spiritual ideals and material realities shaped cultural developments from late antiquity to the Protestant Reformation. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

SMC196H1 - Beauty, Human and Divine

Hours: 24S

What is beauty? A quality of fragile things? Or a manifestation of something transcendent? Is beauty human, divine—or both? This seminar will take up these questions by exploring the great works—and intense debates—inspired by the encounter between Christianity and beauty. We will consider the tensions and paradoxes that arise when artists work with religious subject matter, how Christianity’s central claims expand conventional aesthetics categories, and how secular artists respond to these expressions and developments. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

SMC197H1 - The Sistine Chapel: History, Imagery, Usage

Hours: 24S

The Sistine Chapel in Rome is a historical artifact, an artistic monument, and a house of worship—at once recognizable and mystifying. This seminar explores fifteenth-century origins, decoration by some of the most accomplished artists of the Italian renaissance, and continuing use (especially the election of popes). Topics will include: art and patronage, rhetoric and ritual, controversial restoration, and the Sistine Chapel in popular culture—with an emphasis on the close analysis of the major frescoes. The seminar will develop the academic skills needed for the analysis and discussion of texts, paintings, and ritual events. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: