Course Changes in the 2019-20 Calendar

This page includes all changes to courses since the 2018-19 Calendar. Any questions about the courses below should be directed to the relevant academic unit.

Use the filters at the top of each section to find changes by type of change, program area, breadth requirement or distribution requirement. 

Courses with Changes
(Title, Description, Prerequisites/Exclusions/Corequisites, and Breadth Requirements)

For Course Code, Title and Description
Prerequisites, Corequisites, Exclusions

Hours: L/T/P/S

ACT230H1 - Mathematics of Finance for Non-Actuaries

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to financial mathematics, interest measurement, present value calculation, annuity valuation, loan amortization, consumer financing arrangements, bond valuation. The course is aimed at a general audience who will not be continuing in the actuarial science program. Course manuals fee: $30.

Prerequisite: First-year Calculus
Exclusion: ACT240H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ACT240H1 - Mathematics of Investment & Credit

Hours: 24L/12T

Interest, discount and present values, as applied to determine prices and values of annuities, mortgages, bonds, equities; loan repayment schedules and consumer finance payments in general; yield rates on investments given the costs on investments. Course manuals fee: $45.

Prerequisite: MAT137Y1 (minimum grade 63%)/ MAT157Y1 (minimum grade 60%)
Exclusion: ACT230H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ACT245H1 - Financial Principles for Actuarial Science I

Hours: 24L/12T

Term structure of interest rates, cashflow duration, convexity and immunization, forward and futures contracts, interest rate swaps, introduction to investment derivatives and hedging strategies.

Prerequisite: ACT240H1, MAT137Y1 (minimum grade 63%)/ MAT157Y1 (minimum grade 60%)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ACT247H1 - Introductory Life Contingencies

Hours: 36L

Probability theory applied to survival and to costs and risks of life assurances, life annuities, and pensions; analysis of survival distributions; international actuarial notation. Course manuals fee: $35.

Prerequisite: ACT240H1; MAT137Y1 (minimum grade 63%)/ MAT157Y1 (minimum grade 60%); STA257H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ACT348H1 - Advanced Life Contingencies

Hours: 36L

Determination of benefit premium and benefit reserves for life insurance and annuities; analysis of insurance loss random variables; theory of life contingencies for multiple lives. Course manuals fee: $40.

Prerequisite: ACT240H1 (minimum grade C); ACT245H1 (minimum grade C); ACT247H1 (minimum grade C); ( STA257H1, STA261H1); MAT237Y1/​ MAT257Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ACT451H1 - Loss Models

Hours: 36L

Loss models policy adjustments, frequency and severity models, compound distributions.

Prerequisite: STA261H1, ACT348H1, ACT350H1/​ STA347H1. ( ACT348H1, ACT350H1/​ STA347H1 can be corequisite with permission of instructor)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ACT475H1 - Insurance Products and Regulation with AXIS

Hours: 36L

Examine key types of insurance products and their pricing and valuation. Review representative developments in insurance regulations in US, Europe and Canada. Demonstrate case studies using leading actuarial application AXIS.

Prerequisite: ACT240H1, ACT245H1, ACT247H1
Corequisite: ACT348H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ANT204H1 - Social Cultural Anthropology and Global Issues

Previous Course Number: ANT204Y1
Hours: 24L/12T

A course focused on recent anthropological scholarship that seeks to understand and explain the transformation of contemporary societies and cultures. Topics may include some of the following: new patterns of global inequality, war and neo-colonialism, health and globalization, social justice and indigeneity, religious fundamentalism, gender inequalities, biotechnologies and society etc.

Exclusion: ANT204Y1
Recommended Preparation: ANT100Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ANT416H1 - Archaeology of Ritual and Identity

Hours: 24L

This course offers a comparative survey of archaeological approaches to ritual practice as it relates to identity politics, personhood, and the negotiation of power relations in past societies. An important goal of the seminar is to introduce students to social theories on the inherent materiality of ritual performance, whether orchestrated in everyday practice or in elaborate religious and political spectacles.

Prerequisite: ARH305H1 and one of ANT100Y1/​ ANT200Y1/​ ANT356H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ANT426H1 - Western Views of the Non-West

Hours: 24S

The history and present of western concepts and images about the ‘Other’, in anthropological and other scholarship and in popular culture.

Prerequisite: 0.5 300 level FCE from Anthropology Group C (Society, Culture, Language), or NMC or Jewish Studies or Diaspora and Transnational Studies or History
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ANT457H1 - Anthropology of Material Culture

Hours: 24L

The course addresses the cultural and social significance of material culture in specific cultural settings, and the role that artifacts have played in the history of anthropological thought from early typological displays to the most recent developments of material culture studies.

Prerequisite: ANT200Y1 or ANT207H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

APM346H1 - Partial Differential Equations

Hours: 36L

Sturm-Liouville problems, Green's functions, special functions (Bessel, Legendre), partial differential equations of second order, separation of variables, integral equations, Fourier transform, stationary phase method.

Prerequisite: MAT235Y1/​MAT235Y5/(MATB41H3, MATB42H3)/ MAT237Y1/​(MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/MAT237Y5/ MAT257Y1, MAT244H1/​MAT244H5/ MAT267H1
Exclusion: MAT351Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

APM441H1 - Asymptotic and Perturbation Methods

Hours: 36L

Asymptotic series. Asymptotic methods for integrals: stationary phase and steepest descent. Regular perturbations for algebraic and differential equations. Singular perturbation methods for ordinary differential equations: W.K.B., strained co-ordinates, matched asymptotics, multiple scales. (Emphasizes techniques; problems drawn from physics and engineering)

Prerequisite: APM346H1/​ MAT351Y1, MAT334H1/​ MAT354H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

BCH370H1 - Laboratory Course in Biochemical Techniques

Hours: 48P

This course is designed to provide hands-on experience at an introductory level, employing a variety of biochemical techniques commonly used in research and clinical diagnostic laboratories. This course is intended for students who are not proceeding further in biochemistry. It is highly recommended that students take this course in their third year as space is limited and priority will go to third-year students. This course will be offered in the FALL & WINTER terms. Attendance in the first week of class is mandatory in order to receive safety information and laboratory protocols. (Enrolment limited.) (Lab fees: $50)

Prerequisite: BCH210H1.
Exclusion: BCH377H1, CHM379H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH372Y1 - Summer Research in Biochemistry

Hours: 144P

Real-world opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge and hone technical skills through full-time research in an active research laboratory for students who have completed second year. Students are responsible for arranging for supervision by a Department of Biochemistry faculty member in advance of the academic year-end. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: A final grade of 75% or higher in BCH242Y1 and approval of the course coordinator.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH374Y1 - Research Project in Biochemistry

Hours: 12T/144P

This course provides an opportunity to perform specialized research in biochemistry under the direct supervision of Biochemistry Department Faculty. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: For Specialist: BCH242Y1 (75% or higher); BIO230H1; CHM247H1/​ CHM249H1, and approval of the course coordinator. For Major: BCH210H1 (80% or higher); BIO230H1; CHM247H1/​ CHM249H1, and approval of the course coordinator.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH426H1 - Regulation of Signalling Pathways

Hours: 24L

This course is focussed on the molecular aspects of signal transduction, covering how cells receive and then transmit signals via intracellular proteins such as kinases and phosphatases and how this ultimately regulates cell function. Specific topics covered may include calcium regulation and signalling by extracellular ligands including morphogens, growth factors and/or insulin.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1; BCH311H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ PSL350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH428H1 - Genomics of Microbial Communities in Human Health and Beyond

Hours: 24L/12P

There is a growing appreciation that microbes do not operate in isolation but form parts of larger populations and communities (microbiomes) with unique considerations for human health. Combining lectures, small group discussions, and a computer lab component, this course will cover how genomics can be applied to analyze microbial communities and the transformative discoveries that continue to result.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1; BCH311H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ CSB349H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH440H1 - Protein Biosynthesis

Hours: 24L

"The life of proteins: from birth to death". This course is presented as eight themes. 1. Structure, assembly, and evolution of the ribosome. 2. Messenger RNA synthesis, maturation, and localization. 3. Mechanisms and regulation of translation initiation. 4. Fidelity during translation elongation. 5. Translation termination and translation-mediated mRNA decay. 6. Nascent protein folding and molecular chaperones. 7. Protein aging, misfolding and disease. 8. Protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system and autophagy. In addition to the lectures, groups of students will interpret a recent paper related to the lecture material to be formally presented during regular class hours.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1; BCH311H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ PSL350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH444H1 - Protein Trafficking in the Secretory & Endocytic Pathways

Hours: 24L

This course examines the molecular details of the secretory and endocytic pathways in the cell. Some of the specific topics covered will include protein translocation into the ER, chaperones and protein folding in the ER, retrotranslocation and protein degradation, the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), vesicle biogenesis and ER-Golgi transport, regulated secretion, basic concepts in endocytosis and protein sorting in polarized cells. Emphasis is placed on current experimental approaches. A good understanding of basic biochemical methods is an asset.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1; BCH311H1 (75% or higher)/ MGY311Y1 (75% or higher)/ PSL350H1 (75% or higher).
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH446H1 - Membrane Dynamics of the Cell Surface

Hours: 24L

This course covers the principles and concepts related to molecular cell biology of the cell surface in multicellular organisms. Topics include: biophysical properties of cells, membranes, and extracellular matrix, dynamic remodelling of the cytoskeleton; cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions; maintenance of planar and apical-basal cell polarity; cytokinesis, viral uptake by macropinocytosis and engulfment by phagocytosis. In addition to lectures, groups of students will interpret a recent scientific paper related to the course material to be formally presented during regular class hours.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1; BCH311H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ PSL350H1.
Exclusion: CSB331H1, CSB428H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH472Y1 - Advanced Summer Research Project in Biochemistry

Hours: 144P

Real-world opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge and hone technical skills through full-time research in an active research laboratory for students who have completed third year. Students are responsible for arranging for supervision by a Department of Biochemistry faculty member in advance of the academic year-end. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: A final grade of 75% or higher in each of BCH340H1; BCH377H1; BCH378H1; and approval of the course coordinator.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH473Y1 - Advanced Research Project in Biochemistry

Hours: 144P

This course provides opportunities to pursue an original individual research project in a particular area of biochemistry, under the direct supervision of a Biochemistry Department faculty member. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: For Specialist: BCH340H1; BCH377H1; BCH378H1; 75% or higher in MGY311Y1; and approval of the course coordinator. For Major: BCH370H1; 80% or higher in BCH311H1; and approval of the course coordinator.
Corequisite: BCH478H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO130H1 - Molecular and Cell Biology

Hours: 36L/15P

One of the goals of modern biology is to understand how the basic building blocks of life give rise to biological form and function. This course provides students with a common lexicon to understand the key principles and concepts in molecular and cell biology, with a focus on how the building blocks of life lead to functioning cells. (Lab Materials Fee: $10). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: SBI4U and SCH4U (Grade 12 University Preparation Biology and Chemistry) or permission of department. Please contact bio130@utoronto.ca for more information.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO230H1 - From Genes to Organisms

Hours: 36L/15P

The genome is the "book of life," providing instructions to construct an organism. This course introduces genome biology and explores how the building blocks of life are networked into functioning organisms. We will investigate how cells perceive internal and external cues, how gene expression is shaped by this perception, and how these events give rise to tissues, organs, and whole organisms. (Lab Materials Fee: $20). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: BIO130H1, ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/( CHM138H1, CHM139H1)/ CHM151Y1
Exclusion: BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO255H1 - From Genes to Organisms with Advanced Laboratory

Hours: 36L/33P

The genome is the "book of life," providing instructions to construct an organism. This course introduces genome biology and explores how the building blocks of life are networked into functioning organisms. We will investigate how cells perceive internal and external cues, how gene expression is shaped by this perception, and how these events give rise to tissues, organs, and whole organisms. The Enhanced Laboratory provides the opportunity for greater laboratory skill development in modern investigative techniques and is intended for students interested in conducting their own laboratory research. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: BIO130H1, ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/( CHM138H1, CHM139H1)/ CHM151Y1, cGPA 3.0
Exclusion: BIO230H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1 (taken concurrently or previously)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO260H1 - Concepts in Genetics

Hours: 48L/12T

This is a problem based course which discusses classical, molecular, developmental, and population genetics and genomics with emphasis on model organisms for genetic analysis.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Exclusion: HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO270H1 - Animal Physiology I

Hours: 24L/9P

Animal physiology is a biological sub-discipline that aims to understand, in physical and chemical terms, how animals work. This course uses examples from throughout the animal kingdom, in a comparative approach, to introduce and study homeostasis and the endocrine system. Accompanying laboratories reinforce concepts introduced in lectures and provide opportunities for students to experience firsthand the role that experimentation, data collection, interpretation of data, and communication of data plays in the nature of the scientific process. (Lab Materials Fee: $10). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: BIO130H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO271H1 - Animal Physiology II

Hours: 24L/9P

Animal physiology is a biological sub-discipline that aims to understand, in physical and chemical terms, how animals work. This course uses examples from throughout the animal kingdom in a comparative approach to introduce and study the nervous and cardiorespiratory systems. Accompanying laboratories reinforce concepts introduced in lectures and provide opportunities for students to experience firsthand the role that experimentation, data collection, interpretation of data, and communication of data plays in the nature of the scientific process. (Lab Materials Fee: $10). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: BIO270H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CAS200H1 - Introduction to Contemporary Asian Studies

Hours: 24L

This course is an introduction to Contemporary Asian Studies. It covers detailed case study material from South Asia, Southeast Asia, and East Asia. It introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of political, sociocultural and economic interactions among these regions, as well as the transnational forces shaping internal dynamics throughout Asia. In addition, it examines the ways that forces stemming from Asia are affecting global processes, pushing scholarship to engage questions about colonialism, nationalism, "race," religion, markets, urbanization, migration, and mass mediated culture. This course provides preparation for more advanced courses on Asia and globalization and provides an introductory gateway for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor. May be taken in the first year of studies.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS201H1 - Global Asian Studies: Insights and Concepts

Previous Course Number: CAS200Y1
Hours: 24L

This course addresses Asia empirically in contemporary global formations and as an idea in the global imagination. It introduces students to concepts and theories central to scholarship on Asia and its transnational formations. It provides foundational theoretical and conceptual material to understand global issues as they play out in the politics, economies, cultures and contemporary social worlds of contemporary Asian sites. Interdisciplinary analytical and research concepts are introduced to provide area studies grounding. This course provides preparation to delve into deeper research on Asia connected to broad questions about the natures of democracy, authoritarianism, market formation, social justice, and the media of cultural expression. It informs students aiming to take more advanced courses on Asia and globalization and provides one part of the foundation for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor. CAS201H1 introduces the theoretical and conceptual frameworks that are explored through further grounded empirical case studies in upper year CAS courses.

Exclusion: CAS200Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS202H1 - Global Asian Studies: Sites and Practices

Previous Course Number: CAS200Y1
Hours: 24L

This interdisciplinary course explores a variety of sites and topics in South, Southeast, and East Asia. It explores themes including contemporary and historical articulations of socio-economic development, (post)colonial political formations, urbanization processes, climate change, labour struggles, gender studies, migration, citizenship, and social justice. The course examines the diversity of Asian modernities, cross-regional linkages, and changing approaches to area studies over time. It provides a foundation for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor, preparing students for taking more advanced courses on Asia in the global context.

Exclusion: CAS200Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS310H1 - Comparative Colonialisms in Asia

Hours: 24L

This course analyzes the impact of colonialism in South, East, and Southeast Asia and the various ways in which pre-colonial traditions intersect with and reshape colonial and postcolonial process across the various regions of Asia. The course will examine the conjunctures of economy, politics, religion, education, ethnicity, gender, and caste, as these have played out over time in the making and re-making of Asia as both idea and place. Attention will be paid to postcolonial and indigenous theories, questions of ‘the colonial’ from the perspective of Asian Studies, and debates about the meaning of postcolonialism for the study of Asia now and in the future.

Prerequisite: 0.5 FCE in 200 level CAS courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS320H1 - Comparative Modernities in Asia

Hours: 24L

Since at least the late 1700s, the effects of capitalism across the globe have profoundly transformed the landscapes of human livelihood, consumption, production and governance in Asia. While colonial empires have declined, new empires have emerged, and a growing number of countries have witnessed the rise of nationalism and independent states, social, political and technological revolutions, and most recently neoliberal globalization. This course theorizes and explores these dramatic changes in a comparative framework. It is aimed at students wishing to better understand the great transformations of modern Asia in a global context.

Prerequisite: 0.5 FCE in 200 level CAS courses
Recommended Preparation: CAS202H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS350H1 - Asian Youth Cultures

Hours: 24L

In focusing on youth in Asia, this course brings together two disputed cultural formations of substantial contemporary importance. Both youth and Asia are increasingly invoked on the global stage in support of a wide range of interests. Examining practices of young people and the idea of youth in the context of Asia requires critical attention to the promises and fears that attach to the rise of Asian economies, international demographic transitions, the growth of a global middle-class, increasing consumption disparities, changing immigration patterns, expanding technological skills, global/local environmental concerns, and young people’s shifting political priorities and loyalties. The course may feature a significant amount of social theory, with authors such as Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, Louis Althusser, and Stuart Hall.

Prerequisite: Minimum of 6 FCEs
Recommended Preparation: 0.5 FCE in 200 level CAS courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

CAS360H1 - Asian Genders

Hours: 24L

This course will explore ways that gender is mobilized and produced in parts of Asia. It seeks to understand gender and sexuality in their diversity and in attempts to “fix” or locate it in various bodies and places. Attempts will be made to see how gender is made knowable in terms of sexuality, medicine, nation, class, ethnicity, religion, and other discourses. The course assumes a willingness to read challenging theory – such as the writings of Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and Eve Sedgwick – and asks that students commit to regular attendance.

Prerequisite: Minimum of 6 FCEs
Recommended Preparation: 0.5 FCE in 200 level CAS courses
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS370H1 - Asian Cities

Hours: 24L

This course offers a multidisciplinary perspective of urban life in Asia. The thematic focus will be on how the urban intersects with modernities and postcolonial formations. Drawing on recent scholarship in the social sciences and the humanities, we will examine the realignment of cultural, political, and economic forces associated with Asia’s diverse processes of urbanization.

Prerequisite: Minimum of 6 FCEs
Recommended Preparation: 0.5 FCE in 200 level CAS courses
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS400H1 - Interdisciplinary Research in Methods in Contemporary Asian Studies

Hours: 24S

This seminar addresses Asian worlds – In Asia, transnationally, and locally – to cultivate new approaches to global processes and problems. The course explores key Asian sites that open new configurations for studying interactions between economic/environmental development, political change, and migration and cultural politics. It provides an advanced and systematic overview of the research methodologies that students have been exposed to throughout the CAS program. These include historical-archival, ethnographic, visual/media, and statistical/quantitative methods that allow us to map Asian political, economic, and cultural formations, and through them, global challenges. The seminar builds interdisciplinary conversations attentive to both critical problematizing and problem-solving, to qualitative and applied projects. It is the required capstone to the Contemporary Asian Studies major.

Prerequisite: 1.0 FCE in 200 level CAS courses; 1.0 FCE in 300 level CAS courses
Exclusion: CAS400Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS450H1 - Asian Pathways Research Practice

Hours: 24S

This seminar builds on the systematic overview of research methodologies of the Contemporary Asian Studies major and its capstone course, CAS400H1. CAS450H1 provides students with the opportunity to research questions of contemporary relevance stemming from Asia and its transnational networks and communities. Addressing a range of methodologies, including historical-archival, ethnographic, visual/media, and statistical/quantitative, the course emphasizes research experience outside the classroom, in Asia as well as locally with communities in Toronto. Students will develop their own research contributions while working collaboratively.

Prerequisite: At least 14 FCEs, including 1.0 FCE in 200 level CAS courses and 1.0 FCE in 300 level CAS courses
Exclusion: CAS400Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS490H1 - Special Topics in Contemporary Asian Studies

Hours: 24S

Course content varies in accordance with the interest of the instructor. Check http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/cas for an updated description.

Prerequisite: At least 14 FCEs including 1.0 FCE in 200 level CAS courses, 1.0 FCE in 300 level CAS courses, and enrolment in the Contemporary Asian Studies major or minor or permission from the Program Director.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

CAS498Y1 - Independent Research

Supervised independent research on a topic agreed on by the student and supervisor before enrolment in the course. Open to advanced students with a strong background in contemporary Asian studies. A maximum of one year of Independent Research courses is allowed per program. Contact hours with the supervisor may vary, but typically comprise of one hour per week. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 14 FCEs including 1.0 FCE in 200 level CAS courses, 1.0 FCE in 300 level CAS courses, enrolment in the Contemporary Asian Studies major or minor, and permission from the Program Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

CHM210H1 - Chemistry of Environmental Change

Hours: 24L/12T

Examines the fundamental chemical processes of the Earth’s natural environment, and changes induced by human activity. Topics relate to the atmosphere: urban air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain; the hydrosphere: water resources and pollution, wastewater analysis; biogeochemistry and inorganic metals in the environment.

Prerequisite: ( CHM135H1/​ CHM139H1/​ CHM151Y1), ( MAT135H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1)
Exclusion: ENV235Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM417H1 - Laboratory Instrumentation

Hours: 24L/10P

This course provides an introduction to building and using optics- and electronics-based instrumentation for laboratory research, as well as for implementing custom software control. Lecture topics include passive electronic components, diodes and transistors, operational amplifiers, analogue-to-digital conversion, light sources and detectors, reflectors, refractors, polarizers, diffractors, and many others. Lectures are supplemented by laboratories in which students work in teams to build fluorescent detection systems for chromatography over the course of several weeks. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).

Recommended Preparation: CHM317H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CLA232H1 - Greek Literature and Society

Hours: 36L

An introduction to ancient Greek literature. Students will explore a range of genres, authors and texts as well as ways of interpreting them.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

CLA233H1 - Roman Literature and Society

Hours: 36L

An introduction to ancient Roman literature. Students will explore a range of genres, authors and texts as well as ways of interpreting them.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

COG260H1 - Data, Computation, and the Mind

Hours: 24L/12P

How does the human mind work? We explore this question by analyzing a range of data concerning such topics as human rationality and irrationality, human memory, how objects are represented in the mind, and the relation of language and cognition. This class provides critical thinking and practical computational skills that will allow students to work with data in cognitive science and related disciplines.

Prerequisite: CSC108H1/​ CSC148H1
Corequisite: COG250Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

COG341H1 - Issues on Attention, Perception and Consciousness

Hours: 36L

An examination of core topics in cognitive science building on introductions in COG250Y1. Typical topics include: perception and attention; concepts; imagery; consciousness.

Prerequisite: COG250Y1; COG260H1 and one of PSY270H1/​ PHL342H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

COG401H1 - Seminar in Cognitive Science

Hours: 36S

Advanced treatment of cognitive science topics for arts majors. Possible topics include: concepts, consciousness, the mind-body problem, cognitive science and the arts.

Prerequisite: COG250Y1; PHL342H1; 14.0 credits
Exclusion: COG402H1, COG403H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

COG402H1 - Seminar in Cognitive Science

Hours: 36S

Advanced treatment of cognitive science topics such as neuroscientific theories of consciousness, rationality and modelling of cognitive processes.

Prerequisite: COG250Y1; PSY270H1; 14.0 credits
Exclusion: COG401H1; COG403H1
Distribution Requirements: Science; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

COG403H1 - Seminar in Cognitive Science

Hours: 36S

Advanced treatment of cognitive science topics, including the application of core ideas from probability theory, information theory, statistics, and machine learning to modelling human cognition and artificial intelligence.

Prerequisite: CSC148H1; COG250Y1; COG260H1; ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1, 0.5 FCE in statistics; 14.0 credits
Exclusion: COG401H1; COG402H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

COG415H1 - Cognitive Science in Practice

Hours: 18L/15P

This course provides COG students with the opportunities to practice quantitative and qualitative evaluation and assessment methods in real world situations and juxtapose theory with practice. Placement activities will ground topics such as problem solving, logistics, decision making, etc., through practical application, individual and group / in-class critical reflection.

Prerequisite: COG250Y1, COG341H1/​ COG342H1, PSY370H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

COG498H1 - Independent Study

Advanced Independent Study. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

COG499H1 - Individual Study in Cognitive Science

Advanced Independent Study. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

CRI205H1 - Introduction to Criminology

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to the study of crime and criminal behaviour. The concept of crime, the process of law formation, and the academic domain of criminology. Theories of crime causation, methodologies used by criminologists, and the complex relationship between crime, the media and modern politics.

Prerequisite: Min. 4.0 FCEs
Corequisite: CRI225H1
Exclusion: WDW205H1, WDW200Y1
Recommended Preparation: 2 FCEs from ECO/HIS/PHL/POL/PSY/SOC with a combined average of at least 70%
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI215H1 - Introduction to Sociolegal Studies

Hours: 24L/12T

The course covers several major issues that will help prepare students for advanced courses in the criminology major: the meaning of law, the production of laws and legal institutions, law in action, comparative legal traditions, and the methodology of sociolegal studies.

Prerequisite: Min. 4.0 FCEs
Exclusion: WDW215H1
Recommended Preparation: 2 FCEs from ECO/HIS/PHL/POL/PSY/SOC with a combined average of at least 70%
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI225H1 - Criminal Law

Hours: 24L/12T

The main principles and themes of Canadian criminal law; legal definitions of crime, requirements of a criminal act (actus reus), criminal intention (mens rea), causation and defences. The origins, goals and functioning of criminal law, and limits on the power of the state to criminalize behaviour.

Prerequisite: Min. 4.0 FCEs
Corequisite: CRI205H1
Exclusion: WDW225H1, WDW220Y1
Recommended Preparation: 2 FCEs from ECO/HIS/PHL/POL/PSY/SOC with a combined average of at least 70%
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSB201H1 - Molecular Biology, Biotechnology and You

Hours: 24L/12T

An online course intended to provide non-science students with an understanding of basic concepts in molecular biology and genetics, with particular emphasis on humans. Students will work online in groups on problem sets. The course will end with an introduction to biotechnology, including an opportunity for students to use their new knowledge to explore a real, multi-dimensional problem (e.g., cancer). Lectures will be delivered via the web and mandatory tutorials will require live webinar participation. The final exam will require attendance on the St. George campus. This course does not count towards CSB programs.

Exclusion: BIO130H1, BIO230H1, BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB202H1 - Further Exploration in Biotechnology

Hours: 24L/12T

Provides non-science students with an additional opportunity to explore biotechnology and its applications in agriculture, the environment, and human health including: drug discovery, aging, and vaccines. Most lectures are viewed online before class and students work in groups during class on problem sets and case studies designed to stimulate further learning, enhance evidence-based reasoning, and promote reflection on the role of biotechnology in society. This course does not count towards CSB programs. CSB201H1 is not a prerequisite for this course.

Exclusion: BIO230H1, BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB327H1 - Extracellular Matrix Dynamics and Associated Pathologies

Hours: 36L

Examines the expression, structure and function of the four major classes of ECM macromolecules: collagen, proteoglycans, non-collagenous structural proteins and glycoproteins. In addition to forming elaborate networks that give tissues and organs their unique architectural design and biomechanical properties, ECM molecules act as potent regulators of all cellular activities. Emphasis is placed on the morphoregulatory contribution(s) of ECM molecules to normal and pathological development.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB328H1 - Developmental Biology

Hours: 24L/24P

Basic concepts in developmental biology. Early development of invertebrates and vertebrates will be discussed with emphasis on experimental and molecular analysis of developmental mechanisms. Tutorials focus on the experimental analysis of embryonic development and regeneration, and discuss primary literature of selected topics in developmental biology. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB329H1 - Stem Cell Biology: Developmental Models and Cell-based Therapeutics

Hours: 24L/12T

Stem cells provide the basis for cellular diversity in multicellular organisms and have enormous therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine. The course will introduce students to the differences and similarities between stem cells from different organisms, their roles throughout development and therapeutic potentials.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB330H1 - Techniques in Molecular and Cell Biology

Hours: 8L/52P

Laboratory course on molecular and cell biology research techniques used to study genes and proteins. Topics include plasmid cloning, PCR, bioinformatics, gene expression analyses, protein-protein interactions, and protein subcellular localization. (Lab Materials Fee: $50).

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1 taken concurrently
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB331H1 - Advanced Cell Biology I: Cellular Dynamics During Development

Hours: 36L

The development of multicellular organisms is dependent on complex cell-cell and cell-matrix dynamics. The course examines the molecules and mechanisms involved and how they act in concert to regulate distinct developmental and physiological events. Emphasis is placed on the experimental approaches and technology used to study the molecular interactions and dynamics that alter structure-function relationships in cells and organisms.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB340H1 - Plant Development

Hours: 24L

Plant developmental genetics at the molecular, cellular and organismal level, generation and use of genomic resourses in plant model organisms. Questions address the genetic dissection of plant embryo and meristem development, plant stem cell specification and tissue patterning. Genomic approaches applicable to plant biotechnology are also covered.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​( HMB265H1 with a minimum grade of 73%)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB348H1 - Laboratory in Comparative Animal Physiology

Hours: 48L

Laboratory exercises will include traditional and guided inquiry approaches to investigate and gain an understanding of the regulation of physiological systems in vertebrates and invertebrates. Students will experience the nature of physiological investigation while being exposed to a range of the current experimental approaches animal physiologists use to design, test and evaluate hypotheses, and communicate their findings. This course will emphasize the fundamental characteristics humans share with all animal life and the physiological adaptations that have permitted species to exploit alternative environmental niches. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: BIO270H1, BIO271H1
Exclusion: PSL372H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB349H1 - Eukaryotic Gene Expression

Hours: 30L/18T

Genome structure and the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Topics include gene duplication, repetitive DNA, transcription, gene silencing and regulation, expression profiling, and nuclear reprogramming. Tutorials emphasize problem based learning exercises that relate to recent advances in the broad field of eukaryotic gene expression.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Exclusion: MGY311Y1, MGY420H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB350H1 - Laboratory in Molecular Plant Biology

Hours: 24L/36P

Laboratory methods used in plant molecular biology research. Topics include vector construction, plant transformations, PCR, DNA blots, high-throughput screens, genetic mapping, and bioinformatic analyses. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO251H1 or higher level plant biology course; BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1 concurrently
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB351Y1 - Introductory Virology

Hours: 48L/48T

An introduction to basic and medical virology. What you should know about viruses and the diseases they cause. Tutorials are optional.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB352H1 - Bioinformatic Methods

Hours: 6L/18P

Use of available programs for analyzing biological data. This is an introductory course with a strong emphasis on hands-on methods. Some theory is introduced, but the main focus is on using extant bioinformatics tools to analyze data and generate biological hypotheses.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB353H1 - Plant-Microorganism Interactions and Plant Immunity

Hours: 24L

Plants have co-evolved with microbes ever since their first appearance on land, resulting in sophisticated strategies of pathogenicity, symbiosis, commensalisms and mutualism. This course presents an overview of these strategies with examples of bacteria, fungi, oomycetes and viruses that have evolved intimate associations with plants, and discusses plant immune systems.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Exclusion: CSB452H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO251H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB428H1 - Advanced Cell Biology II: Cell Polarity and Cytoskeletal Dynamics

Hours: 12L/12T/12S

This advanced course covers cell polarity and cytoskeletal dynamics emphasizing current literature. For each topic, the course examines (1) the proteins involved, (2) their interactions and regulation, and (3) how they organize specific cellular structures. The coordination of these complexes for orchestrating complex cellular processes is also addressed. These important topics of cell biology are pursued with question-driven lectures, and both round-table discussions and group presentations of research papers.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 73% in BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1, minimum grade of 73% in BCH340H1/​ CJH332H1/​ CSB328H1/​ CSB329H1/​ CSB331H1/​ CSB340H1/​ CSB353H1/​CSB397Y0
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB450H1 - Proteomics in Systems Biology

Hours: 24L

A discussion on current proteomic approaches to understand biological processes. The role of mass spectrometry, gel electrophoresis, protein-protein interaction and structural biology in understanding how proteins function in pathways and interaction networks will be discussed.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BCH210H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB458H1 - Epigenetics

Hours: 36S

A seminar course exploring non-Mendelian phenomena in plants, fungi and animals that reveal aspects of genome organization and regulation that may provide insight into genome function and evolution.

Prerequisite: BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1, BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB472H1 - Computational Genomics and Bioinformatics

Hours: 24L/12T

Computational analyses of DNA and RNA expression data. Understanding biological databases, sequence alignment, sequence annotation, gene prediction, computational analysis of function, motif analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and gene expression profiling analysis. Applied, theoretical and statistical issues will be addressed.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB473H1 - Chemical Genomics

Hours: 24L

This course surveys the field of Chemical Genomics, focusing on the analysis of biological problems using chemical approaches. Topics covered include chemical genetics, combinatorial chemistry and combinatorial strategies in molecular biology. Examines both the underlying biological and chemical concepts; however, the focus is primarily biological.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1, CHM247H1/​ CHM249H1/​any 300+ CHM course
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB491H1 - Team-Based Research: Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

CSB491H1 will build on molecular biology and biochemistry approaches acquired in CSB350H1 to investigate the role of metabolic enzymes in plants. Students will work in teams to address a specific aspect of a research project. They will develop laboratory and teamwork skills that are desirable for them to function in a research laboratory and in the workplace. The course will integrate current molecular biology techniques, including designing and characterizing mutants made with CRISPR/Cas9, identifying protein interactors, and performing structural and mechanistic analysis of metabolic enzymes. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Lab coat and safety glasses are required for use in laboratories; students are responsible for purchasing these items (approximate cost is $25).

Prerequisite: CSB350H1 with a minimum grade of 77% and approval of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB497H1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology I

An original research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be mutually agreed upon by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. In the Fall or Winter sessions, a commitment of 8-10 hours per week is expected for research and related course activities. If spread over both the Fall and Winter sessions, a commitment of 4-5 hours per week is expected. In the Summer Session, the number of hours doubles per week (e.g., 16-20 for F or S, or 8-10 for Y) as the length of the term is halved compared to the Fall or Winter term. Many students spend more than this amount of time as they become immersed in their project. This course is normally open only to fourth year students with adequate background in Cell and Systems Biology. Course requirements include a final report, and either an oral presentation (Summer and Fall sessions) or a poster presentation (Winter session). Two workshops on scientific research are scheduled and highly recommended. Details for enrollment are available at http://csb.utoronto.ca/undergraduate-studies/undergraduate-courses/under.... (Lab Materials Fee: $25). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB498Y1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology I

An original research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be mutually agreed upon by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. In the Fall/Winter session, a commitment of 8-10 hours per week is expected for research and related course activities. In the Summer session, the number of hours doubles (16-20 per week) as the length of the term is halved. This course is normally open only to fourth year students with adequate background in Cell and Systems Biology. Course requirements include a final report and either an oral presentation (Summer session) or a poster presentation (Fall/Winter session). Four workshops on scientific research are scheduled and highly recommended. Details for enrollment are available at http://csb.utoronto.ca/undergraduate-studies/undergraduate-courses/under.... (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB499Y1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology II

Allows students to do a second independent project. Operates in the same manner as CSB497H1/ CSB498Y1. Students who have completed both CSB497H1 and CSB498Y1 are excluded from taking CSB499Y1. (Lab Materials Fee: $50). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CSB497H1/​ CSB498Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSC165H1 - Mathematical Expression and Reasoning for Computer Science

Hours: 36L/12T

Introduction to abstraction and rigour. Informal introduction to logical notation and reasoning. Understanding, using and developing precise expressions of mathematical ideas, including definitions and theorems. Structuring proofs to improve presentation and comprehension. General problem-solving techniques. Running time analysis of iterative programs. Formal definition of Big-Oh. Diagonalization, the Halting Problem, and some reductions. Unified approaches to programming and theoretical problems.

Corequisite: CSC108H1/​ CSC120H1/​(equivalent programming experience)
Exclusion: CSC236H1, CSC240H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC207H1 - Software Design

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to software design and development concepts, methods, and tools using a statically-typed object-oriented programming language such as Java. Topics from: version control, unit testing, refactoring, object-oriented design and development, design patterns, advanced IDE usage, regular expressions, and reflection. Representation of floating-point numbers and introduction to numerical computation.

Prerequisite: 60% or higher in CSC148H1 (Please note: The minimum prerequisite grade in CSC148H1 is lower than the minimum grade for program admission in Computer Science. If you take this course when your grade in CSC148H1 is lower than the requirement for program admission, you will be unable to enrol in a Computer Science program. If you hope to enrol in a Computer Science program in future, please ensure that you satisfy the program admission grade requirements in CSC148H1 before completing CSC207H1.)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC236H1 - Introduction to the Theory of Computation

Hours: 24L/12T

The application of logic and proof techniques to Computer Science. Mathematical induction; correctness proofs for iterative and recursive algorithms; recurrence equations and their solutions; introduction to automata and formal languages. This course assumes university-level experience with proof techniques and algorithmic complexity as provided by CSC165H1. Very strong students who already have this experience (e.g. successful completion of MAT157Y1) may consult the undergraduate office about proceeding directly into CSC236H1 or CSC240H1.

Prerequisite: 60% or higher in CSC148H1, 60% or higher in CSC165H1 (Please note: The minimum prerequisite grade in CSC148H1 and CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 is lower than the minimum grade for program admission in Computer Science. If you take this course when your grade in CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 is lower than the requirement for program admission, you will be unable to enrol in a Computer Science program. If you hope to enrol in a Computer Science program in future, please ensure that you satisfy the program admission grade requirements in CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 before completing CSC236H1. Students will not be permitted to retake CSC165H1 after completing CSC236H1.)
Exclusion: CSC240H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC240H1 - Enriched Introduction to the Theory of Computation

Hours: 24L/12T

The rigorous application of logic and proof techniques to Computer Science. Propositional and predicate logic; mathematical induction and other basic proof techniques; correctness proofs for iterative and recursive algorithms; recurrence equations and their solutions (including the Master Theorem); introduction to automata and formal languages. This course covers the same topics as CSC236H1, together with selected material from CSC165H1, but at a faster pace, in greater depth and with more rigour, and with more challenging assignments. Greater emphasis will be placed on proofs and theoretical analysis. Certain topics briefly mentioned in CSC165H1 or CSC236H1 may be covered in more detail in this course, and some additional topics may also be covered.

NOTES:

If you completed CSC165H1 with a course grade less than 85, you should take CSC236H1 instead of CSC240H1.
Students may go to their college to drop down from CSC240H1 to CSC165H1 (or to CSC236H1 if they have already passed CSC165H1). See note in Calendar Section for the drop down deadlines.

Corequisite: CSC148H1; MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
Exclusion: CSC236H1, CSC263H1/​ CSC265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC258H1 - Computer Organization

Hours: 24L/12T/13P

Computer structures, machine languages, instruction execution, addressing techniques, and digital representation of data. Computer system organization, memory storage devices, and microprogramming. Block diagram circuit realizations of memory, control and arithmetic functions. There are a number of laboratory periods in which students conduct experiments with digital logic circuits.

Prerequisite: 60% or higher in CSC148H1, 60% or higher in CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 (Please note: The minimum prerequisite grades in CSC148H1 and CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 are lower than the minimum grades for program admission in Computer Science. If you take this course when your grade in CSC148H1 or CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 is lower than the requirement for program admission, you will be unable to enrol in a Computer Science program. If you hope to enrol in a Computer Science program in future, please ensure that you satisfy the program admission grade requirements in CSC148H1 and CSC165H1/​​ CSC240H1 before completing CSC258H1.)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC318H1 - The Design of Interactive Computational Media

Hours: 24L/12T

User-centred design of interactive systems; methodologies, principles, and metaphors; task analysis. Interdisciplinary design; the role of graphic design, industrial design, and the behavioural sciences. Interactive hardware and software; concepts from computer graphics. Typography, layout, colour, sound, video, gesture, and usability enhancements. Classes of interactive graphical media; direct manipulation systems, extensible systems, rapid prototyping tools. Students work on projects in interdisciplinary teams.

Prerequisite: Any CSC half-course
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the UTSG, UTM, or UTSC are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: CSC300H1 provides useful background for work in CSC318H1, so if you plan to take CSC300H1 then you should do it before CSC318H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC401H1 - Natural Language Computing

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to techniques involving natural language processing and speech in applications such as information retrieval, speech recognition and synthesis, machine translation, summarization, and dialoque. N-grams, corpus analysis, neural methods, and information theory. Python and other software.

Prerequisite: CSC207H1/​ CSC209H1; STA247H1/​ STA255H1/​ STA257H1
Exclusion: NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the UTSG, UTM, or UTSC are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1 is strongly recommended
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC436H1 - Numerical Algorithms

Hours: 24L/12T

Numerical algorithms for the algebraic eigenvalue problem, approximation, integration, and the solution of ordinary differential equations. Emphasis is on the convergence, stability, and efficiency properties of the algorithms.

Prerequisite: CSC336H1/​ CSC350H1
Exclusion: CSC351H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the UTSG, UTM, or UTSC are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Recommended Preparation: MAT235Y1/​ MAT237Y1/​ MAT257Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC438H1 - Computability and Logic

Hours: 24L/12T

Computable functions, Church's thesis, unsolvable problems, recursively enumerable sets. Predicate calculus, including the completeness, compactness, and Lowenheim-Skolem theorems. Formal theories and the Gödel Incompleteness Theorem. Ordinarily offered in years alternating with CSC448H1.

Prerequisite: ( CSC363H1/​ CSC463H1)/ CSC365H1/​ CSC373H1/​ CSC375H1/​ MAT247H1
Exclusion: MAT309H1; PHL348H1. NOTE: Students not enrolled in the Computer Science Major or Specialist program at the UTSG, UTM, or UTSC are limited to a maximum of three 300-/400-level CSC/ECE half-courses.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

DRM200Y1 - Performance I

Hours: 144P

Emphasis is initially placed on ensemble, non-verbal, and improvisational work. Students proceed to the application of their acquired skills to scripted material. Students may apply in their first or second year of University. The Application Deadline is March 10th for the first round of auditions; August 10th for the second round. Please consult the CDTPS undergraduate web page for information on how to apply.

Prerequisite: An audition in April or in August. Newly admitted students can apply for an audition before beginning their first year of studies.
Corequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1 or DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Exclusion: DRS221H5 AND DRS222H5; VPDB01H3 AND VPDB02H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM201H1 - Voice for the Actor I

Hours: 2T/48P

An introduction to the dynamics of voice and effective communication as they relate to the development of the actor. Work brings theory into physical practice. See website for more details.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM202H1 - Directing I

Hours: 24T/36P

An introduction to major concepts and artistic practices in directing, emphasizing theoretical and historical issues with supplemental practical application. The course focuses on different styles, ideas, and goals of theatre directors in their relations to actors, audiences, and broad cultural and political contexts. The Application Form Deadline is March 10th for the first round of interviews; August 10th for the second round. Please consult the CDTPS undergraduate web page for information on how to apply.

Prerequisite: An interview in April or in August with a letter of interest. Newly admitted students can apply for an interview before beginning their first year of studies.
Corequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1 or DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Exclusion: VPDC02H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM211H1 - Movement for the Actor I

Hours: 2T/48P

An introduction to movement for the actor focusing on body awareness and skill development, ensemble sensibility and stagecraft as it pertains to actor training. See website for more details.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM220Y1 - Comparative Theatre Histories

Hours: 72L

An intensive study of a range of historical and cross-cultural dramatic and performance texts and practices that contextualize theatre and performance more broadly within the social, political, and cultural parameters in which they take place. Theatre history is necessarily inextricable from world history and this course considers the many ways theatre and performance interact with the globalized world.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

DRM228H1 - Playwriting I

Hours: 36L

A hands-on study of the craft of dramatic writing. The class examines the basic elements of playwriting such as plot, structure, theme, character, dialogue, setting, with an emphasis on story-making. Attention is given to the development of students own work through written assignments and in-class exercises. The Application Deadline is March 10th for the first round; August 10th for the second round. Please consult the CDTPS undergraduate web page for information on how to apply.

Prerequisite: A portfolio of writing samples due on March 10th or August 10th. Newly admitted students can submit their portfolio of writing samples before beginning their first year of studies.
Corequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1 or DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Exclusion: DRE362H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM230Y1 - Concepts of Twentieth-Century Theatre

Hours: 72L

An introduction to the shifting landscapes of European theatre theory, history and practice in the late 19th century and their repercussions throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. The course focuses on the developments of modern and postdramatic theatre. It also includes critical analysis of the annual Drama Mainstage production and current Canadian theatre.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM254Y1 - Design and Production I

Hours: 72L/72P

A practical and theoretical introduction to the fundamentals of theatrical performance design. This course touches on theatre architecture, conceptual approaches to theatrical design and spacial considerations of live performance. The students will work on case studies and practical projects geared towards understanding theatre terminology, design and production processes. Students will also consider aspects of technical theatre production as they pertain to theatrical design elements. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. First-round applications are due in March, and second-round applications are due in August. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: An interview in April or in August. Newly admitted students can apply for an interview before beginning their first year of studies.
Corequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1 or DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Exclusion: DRM254H1, VPDB03H3 AND VPDC03H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM300Y1 - Performance II

Hours: 144P

Building upon the work of DRM200Y1, students concentrate on scene study, styles of acting, and the development of ensemble work with an intensive focus on voice and movement practices. The Application Deadline is March 10th.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; and permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1 or any course from Group A if DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1 is complete; 0.5 FCE from DRM375H1/​ DRM376H1/​ DRM377H1/​ DRM378H1 or permission of the Centre.
Exclusion: DRS321H5 and DRS322H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM301H1 - Concepts of Voice and Movement

Hours: 3T/48P

An experiential studio course that introduces and develops physical skills in contemporary theatre practice with particular attention on the relationship between voice and moment via the voice, breath, body, movement, emotion, character, text and personal imagery. See website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1, and 1 FCE from Group B
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM302H1 - Directing II

Hours: 36P

A continuation of DRM202H1, concentrating on major concepts and artistic practices in directing. The course focuses on different styles, ideas, and goals of theatre directors in their relations to actors, audiences, and broad cultural and political contexts. A major component will be the practical application of basic directing techniques. Please consult the CDTPS undergraduate web page for information on how to apply and the deadline to apply.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM202H1; and permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1 or any course from Group A.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM311H1 - Movement for the Actor II

Hours: 3T/48P

A continuation of previous training to develop a more expressive body and increase devising skills through a more concentrated study of the relationship between objective, impulse and action using the principles of Viewpoints, Laban and the Margolis Method. See website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM328H1 - Playwriting II

Hours: 36L

A continuation of DRM228H1, concentrating on the in-depth knowledge and practice of playwriting with an emphasis on style and technique of writing for the stage. Students develop their own work through written assignments, in-class exercises, and the final public presentation. Please consult the CDTPS undergraduate web page for information on how to apply and the deadline to apply.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM228H1; and permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1 or any course from Group A
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM331H1 - Dramaturgy

Hours: 36L

Study of dramaturgical theory and of interpretations of the dramaturge's function in the theatre. Using examples from Canada and beyond, students apply this knowledge to theatre practice.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1
Exclusion: DRE348H5; DRE360H5; VPDD01H3
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM354Y1 - Design II

Hours: 72L/72P

An intermediate-level investigation of various aspects of theatrical performance design, with a focus on scenic and costume design. Using skills developed through practical study in the Design Studio, the students form the core of the design team for Drama productions. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM254H1/​ DRM254Y1; and permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1 or any course from Group A
Exclusion: DRM354H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM368H1 - Devised Theatre

Hours: 36L

An in-depth study of devising theatre in a group context. This course offers an intensive exploration of the history and practice of devised theatre within the late 20th and early 21st centuries that will culminate in a number of in-class and public performances.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1 or permission of the Drama Centre.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM375H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; or permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM300Y1 or permission of the Centre.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM375Y1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 72P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; or permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM300Y1 or permission of the Centre.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM376H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; or permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM300Y1 or permission of the Centre.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM377H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; or permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM300Y1 or permission of the Centre.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM378H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please check Studio Topics on the CDTPS undergraduate web page for more details.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​( UNI102H1, UNI106H1)/ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; or permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM300Y1 or permission of the Centre.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM390Y1 - Independent Studies in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

A scholarly project at the 300 level proposed by the individual student in conversation with a member of faculty who is willing to act as supervisor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 10 FCE; Specialist or Major in Drama; A written proposal; Independent study form signed by both student and faculty instructor to be submitted for approval to the Associate Director (undergraduate) before registration: August 1st for September start date; November 1st for January start date.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM391H1 - Independent Studies in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

A scholarly project at the 300 level proposed by the individual student in conversation with a member of faculty who is willing to act as supervisor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 10 FCE; Specialist or Major in Drama; A written proposal; Independent study form signed by both student and faculty instructor to be submitted for approval to the Associate Director (undergraduate) before registration: August 1st for September start date; November 1st for January start date.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM400Y1 - Advanced Performance

Hours: 144P

Advanced Performance builds on the training sequence of DRM200Y1 and DRM300Y1 by developing students’ acting and performance skills in monologues, extensive collaborative scene work, and preparations for auditions. The work focuses on the particulars of character development and the emotional and technical aspects of the actor’s craft. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1; and permission of the Centre.
Exclusion: DRM400H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM401H1 - Advanced Concepts in Voice

Hours: 4T/48P

Advanced voice training to refine the skills and concepts developed thus far in DRM200Y1 and DRM300Y1, focusing on performance. Techniques of articulation, speech, and rhetoric are studied.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1; acceptance into DRM403Y1 or permission of the Centre
Corequisite: DRM403Y1 and DRM411H1; or permission of the Centre
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM402H1 - Advanced Directing

Hours: 24T/36P

An exploration of advanced directing for the theatre. The class is centered on student directed productions, which are publically presented at the end of term. Emphasis is placed on the development of strong central concepts and realizing the production with imagination, collaboration and creativity. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM302H1; DRM331H1; a written proposal and an interview in April.
Recommended Preparation: DRM300Y1 or DRM328H1 or DRM354Y1/​ DRM354H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM403Y1 - Mainstage Performance

Hours: 48T/144P

This course, taught each year by a different visiting professional theatre director, offers upper-level theatre and performance studies students the opportunity to explore acting in a full-length production. Plays are selected to challenge students in a variety of diverse ways, exposing them to a full spectrum of theatre and performance genres and possibilities. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1, 0.5 FCE from DRM368H1/​ DRM375H1/​ DRM376H1/​ DRM377H1/​ DRM378H1; and permission of the Centre.
Corequisite: DRM400H1, DRM413H1 (or permission of the Centre).
Exclusion: DRS425H5 AND DRS426H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM411H1 - Advanced Concepts in Movement

Hours: 2T/48P

Advanced movement training to refine the skills and concepts developed thus far in DRM200Y1 and DRM300Y1, focusing on performance. Techniques of personal physical awareness, movement as a tool for discovery in acting processes, movement as communication in performance, ensemble work, and movement generation are studied.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1; acceptance into DRM403Y1 or permission of the Centre
Corequisite: DRM403Y1 and DRM401H1; or permission of the Centre
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM428H1 - Advanced Playwriting

Hours: 24T/36P

A continuation of DRM328H1, concentrating upon the in-depth knowledge and practice of playwriting with an emphasis on advanced style and technique of writing for the stage. Students develop their own longer work through in-class exercises, one major written assignment, and the final public presentation. Please consult the CDTPS undergraduate web page for information on how to apply.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1, DRM328H1 and a portfolio of writing samples due in November.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM454H1 - Advanced Design

Hours: 36L/36P

An advanced-level exploration of theatrical design skills and techniques, delving deeper into specific areas of specialization and with more opportunity for independent work. Students are expected to participate in Drama Centre productions in senior creative and leadership roles. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM354H1/​ DRM354Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM454Y1 - Advanced Design and Production

Hours: 72L/72P

An advanced-level exploration of design production skills and techniques, delving deeper into specific areas of specialization and with more opportunity for independent work. Students are expected to participate in Drama Centre productions in senior creative and leadership roles. Focus also includes the integration of digital technology into theatrical performance. Applications are required in order to enroll in this course. Please consult the CDTPS Application Guidelines for specific procedures and deadlines.

Prerequisite: Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM354H1/​ DRM354Y1/​ DRM355Y1; and permission of the Centre
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM485H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; and/or permission of the Centre.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM485Y1 - Senior Seminar: Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies Thesis

Hours: 72L

Research thesis, emphasizing topics and methods used in drama, theatre and performance studies. Students must obtain permission from the instructor by submitting a research project proposal. The project may engage creative practice, but the thesis itself will be a critical, written work engaging the research and dramaturgy involved in the performance or artwork. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Deadline is March 10th to apply. See online application for details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; Minimum 70% in required courses: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; and permission of the Centre.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

DRM486H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; and/or permission of the Centre.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM487H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; and/or permission of the Centre.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM488H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama; 14 FCE; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; and/or permission of the Centre.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM490Y1 - Independent Studies in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

A scholarly project at the 400 level proposed by the individual student in conversation with a member of faculty who is willing to act as supervisor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE; Specialist or Major in Drama; Minimum 70% in DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; A written proposal; Independent study form signed by both student and faculty instructor to be submitted for approval to the Associate Director (undergraduate) before registration: August 1st for September start date; November 1st for January start date.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM491H1 - Independent Studies in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

A scholarly project at the 400 level proposed by the individual student in conversation with a member of faculty who is willing to act as supervisor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE; Specialist or Major in Drama; Minimum 70% in DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; A written proposal; Independent study form signed by both student and faculty instructor to be submitted for approval to the Associate Director (undergraduate) before registration: August 1st for September start date; November 1st for January start date.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS110Y1 - Modern Standard Korean I

Hours: 48T/48S

This course is designed to help students build communication skills in the Korean language. Through an integration of listening, speaking, reading and writing, it aims to provide a solid foundation in beginning-level Korean. This course assumes that students do not have any prior knowledge of Korean. Students must go through screening process conducted by the Department. See www.eas.utoronto.ca/languages/korean for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: EAS211Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS120Y1 - Modern Standard Japanese I

Hours: 48L/72T

This course is for students with no or a very limited background in Japanese. Students must go through screening process conducted by the Department. See www.eas.utoronto.ca/languages/japanese/ for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: EAS121H1,EAS122Y0,LGGA80H3,LGGA81H3
Recommended Preparation: Learning the Japanese alphabets (hiragana & katakana)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS121H1 - Japanese I for Students with Prior Background

Hours: 24L/36T

This course is equivalent to the second half of EAS120Y1 for students with some background in the Japanese language. Students must go through placement process conducted by the Department. See www.eas.utoronto.ca/languages/japanese/ for details. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Exclusion: EAS120Y1, EAS222Y0, LGGA81H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS218H1 - Classical Chinese Prose

Hours: 24L

This course introduces the form and types of prose in classical Chinese literature by critical reading of some basic Chinese texts and their English translations on various themes, such as history, philosophy, religion and art.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS243H1 - Japanese Cinemas II: Film Form and the Problems of Modernity

Hours: 36L/12T

This course investigates how film aesthetics relate to the most profound socio-historical problems of Japanese modernity. It also considers how various film makers employ cinematic form to engage the social problems of their moment. Part II focuses on the 1960s - present.

Exclusion: EAS237Y1
Recommended Preparation: EAS242H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS245H1 - Premodern Japanese History

Hours: 24L

A survey of the history of premodern Japan from earliest recorded histories to the establishment of the Tokugawa regime in the seventeenth century. Uses a wide range of translated primary Japanese texts to illuminate the emergence of cultural forms and their conjunction with social, economic, religious, and political trends.

Recommended Preparation: EAS103H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS248H1 - Marxism and East Asia

Hours: 24L

This course focuses on how Marxism became one of the most important and influential systems of revolutionary thought in East Asian countries such as Japan, Korea, and China in the twentieth century, with enormous repercussions for our present historical conjuncture. The course particularly focuses on the theoretical creativity and impasses that went into translating the basic tenets of Marxism to address particular, national questions in East Asia.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS279H1 - East Asian Ecocinema

Hours: 36L

The course examines the ethical, political, historic and aesthetic dimensions of Asian Ecocinema (environmental films that engage with the Asia-based global environmental crisis) and discusses the films’ ways of connecting place and planet.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS284H1 - Modern Chinese Literature

Hours: 24L

This course offers a critical examination of 20th-century Chinese literature, with a focus on the important developments of literary writing over time, from the inception of New Literature in the 1910s, the development of realism and modernism in the 1930s, to the emergency of post-revolution and postmodernist writings in the 1990s. Emphasis is placed on generating a dialogue on interpretations of key works.

Exclusion: EAS284Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS284Y1 - Modern Chinese Literature

Hours: 48L

This course offers a critical examination of 20th-century Chinese literature, with a focus on the important developments of literary writing over time, from the inception of New Literature in the 1910s, the development of realism and modernism in the 1930s, to the emergency of post-revolution and postmodernist writings in the 1990s. Emphasis is placed on generating a dialogue on interpretations of key works.

Exclusion: EAS284H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS296H1 - Topics in East Asian Studies

Hours: 24L

An in-depth study of Chinese, Japanese or Korean culture, history and/or literature. Content depends on the instructor. When offered, the course will have a subtitle that describes its content.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS314H1 - Culture & World After Hiroshima & Nagasaki

Hours: 24L

Exploration of literature, film, and other cultural production related to the atomic bombing and other nuclear catastrophes from transnational, inter-Asia, and transpacific perspectives. Primarily focuses on, but not necessarily limited to, the cultural texts, intellectual concepts, and social thoughts generated out of the history of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic destruction.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS315H1 - The "Yellow Peril": Past & Present

Hours: 24L

Beginning with the Chinese Exclusion Acts, the Asian presence in North America has often been considered a serious social menace. This course explores the Asian/North American response to the past and present "Yellow Peril" constituted as a gendered, sexualized, classed, and racialized epistemological and affective structure of knowledge.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS324H1 - The Asia-Pacific in the Nuclear Age

Hours: 24L

From the events such as the world’s first use of the atoms for war, the Cold War nuclear arms race, the “Atoms for Peace” campaign, the worst nuclear accident in history, to the unfolding threat of nuclear proliferation, the twentieth century Asia-Pacific region has been profoundly shaped by the nuclear age. The course introduces the diverse cultural knowledge and social thoughts that have developed distinctly in the Asia- Pacific in response to the nuclear-related affairs. They include, for instance, the ideas and practices concerning the environment, the human, peace, visibility, security, coloniality, sustainability, etc.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS328H1 - Science, Technology and Society in Modern China

Hours: 24L

Learn to understand modern China from an understudied yet important perspective: the development of science and technology since the establishment of People’s Republic in 1949. Science and technology have played crucial parts in China’s political, economical, social, and cultural transformations. Drawing from anthropological, social, and historical studies of science, we examine, among other topics, science and nation-building, biopolitics, technocracy, and scientists’ self-fashioning at the junction of Communist reign and global capitalism. Students also learn key concepts of science studies.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1/​ CAS201H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS330H1 - Narrative Strategies in Modern Japanese Fiction

Hours: 24L

Discussion of narratives by modern Japanese authors with attention to issues in narratology and contemporary narrative studies such as: voice and perspective; gender and power relationships of the narrator-narratee-narrated; the act of narrating, writing, listening and reading; and metafictional paradox.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS263H1/​ EAS230H1/​ EAS235H1/​ EAS256H1/​ EAS257H1/​ EAS284H1/​ EAS284Y1, or permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS334H1 - Chinese Novels

Hours: 24L

This course explores the development of Chinese fiction from earliest times with emphasis on the twentieth century.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS334Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS334Y1 - Chinese Novels

Hours: 48L

This course explores the development of Chinese fiction from earliest times with emphasis on the twentieth century.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS334H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS348H1 - Gift, Plunder, and Exchange: Japan and World History

Hours: 24L

This course critically re-evaluates the history and historiography of Japanese capitalism, imperialism/colonialism, and world-empire through the lens of three, distinct “modes of exchange”: gift, plunder, and commodity exchange. Inspired by Kojin Karatani’s The Structure of World History: From Modes of Production to Modes of Exchange (2014), this course explores the emancipatory politics inherent in the critical analysis of modes of exchange, and takes up historical cases from Japan, Hokkaido, Okinawa, Taiwan, Korea, China, and the “Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere.”

Prerequisite: EAS105H1/​ EAS247H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS349H1 - Soundscapes and Modern China

Hours: 24L

An introduction to sound studies through the case of modern China. The class surveys basic theories of sound studies. It investigates the technological, cultural, and social production of soundscapes in modern China. Topics include the invention of national language(s), the introduction of gramophone, radio, and sound cinema, and the relationship between sound, aesthetics, and power.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS350H1 - Ideology and Japan

Hours: 24L

This course analyzes the problem of ideology in relation to the development of capitalism and imperialism in modern Japan. Among the topics analyzed in the course will be: the development of a national ideology in the transition to capitalism, the rise of “ultra-nationalism,” the ideological battles between Communism and fascism, the ideological struggles surrounding the U.S. military occupation of Japan, and the question of national ideology in the postwar period.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1/​ EAS247H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS354H1 - Body, Movement, Japan

Hours: 24L

This course will explore theories and practices of the body and movement in Japan by way of a series of associated territories: From the 17th century walking poetry of Basho to various political resistance movements of the 1960s, from the revolutionary dance experiments of Min Tanaka to Buddhist inspired philosophies of Body-Mind and physics inspired theories of movement by Japanese scientists to the movement of information, people, and capital at the contemporary moment.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS358Y1 - Classical Chinese I

Hours: 48S

An introduction to the Classical Chinese language with emphasis on grammatical analysis and translation into English. Open only to EAS majors and specialists.

Prerequisite: EAS103H1, EAS100Y1/​ EAS101Y1/​ EAS200Y1
Recommended Preparation: Two or more years of Modern Standard Chinese
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS363H1 - Classical Japanese Part I

Hours: 24S

Introduction to classical Japanese, followed by readings of various short works by classical authors. Covers first half of EAS362Y1.

Prerequisite: EAS220Y1
Exclusion: EAS362Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS365H1 - Classical Japanese Part II

Hours: 24S

Introduction to classical Japanese, followed by readings of various short works by classical authors. Covers the second half of EAS362Y1. Students must seek permission of the instructor to be placed in the course.

Prerequisite: EAS363H1, EAS220Y1
Exclusion: EAS362Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS366H1 - Lovers and Madmen in Chinese Literature

Hours: 24L

A thematic introduction to some of China's major literary texts by taking as our guide the lover and the madman as both writer and subject. We use the idea of lover and madman to explore issues such as social and behavioral boundaries, desire, violence, narrative compulsion, and the re-imagination of tradition.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS372H1 - The Postwar, Cold War and Divided Koreas

Hours: 24L

This research-oriented course examines the divided history of the Korean peninsula since 1945 in the context of the global war. Examines key debates in the history of contemporary Korea, beginning with the Korean war and ending with the contemporary culture of division.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS372Y1
Recommended Preparation: EAS271H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS372Y1 - The Postwar, Cold War and Divided Koreas

Hours: 48L

This research-oriented course examines the divided history of the Korean peninsula since 1945 in the context of the global war. Examines key debates in the history of contemporary Korea, beginning with the Korean war and ending with the contemporary culture of division.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS372H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS271H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS378H1 - Urban Life in Early Modern Japan

Hours: 24L

An exploration of most important cities of Tokugawa Japan, which were among the largest of the early modern world, and home to vibrant urban culture and economic activity. The texts include buildings, maps, paintings, prints, film and novels.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS380H1 - Writing Women in Premodern China

Hours: 24L

A survey of premodern Chinese texts (before 1700) in translation, written by women, about women, and in the voices of women, across a variety of genres drawn from literature, history, philosophy, and religion. The texts provide opportunities to explore how gender was constructed in Chinese societies, how women were defined and constrained by texts, and how women used writing to express themselves, often in resistance to dominant modes of representation.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS386H1 - Culture of Nature in China

Hours: 24L

The course examines the cultural practice of nature in China’s past and present, focusing on literary, artistic, spiritual, ethical, political, and scientific aspects of human-nature relation. Through scholarly works and primary sources, the course inquires into the cultural politics of human-nature entanglements.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS386Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS397H1 - Literary Lives in Late Imperial China

Hours: 24L

In-depth examination of five to six selected men and women through close reading of their literary repertoire and through biography and autobiography. The material will introduce concepts such as memory, literati identity, aesthetic theories, gender, and social transformations in the Ming and Qing period.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS409H1 - Cities in Premodern China

Hours: 24S

Focusing on selected Chinese cities from the earliest history to 1800 CE, this course introduces students to different aspects of urban life and its representations in literature and history.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1
Exclusion: EAS367H1
Recommended Preparation: Some familiarity with Chinese history in the middle period
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS417H1 - Korean Literary Translation Workshop

Hours: 24L

A workshop format is used to explore problems encountered when translating Korean literary texts (fiction and poetry) into English. Practice with a variety of texts is accompanied by readings in translation theory to refine our understanding of translation and enrich our experience working with historical forms of Korean and English.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS310Y1 or its equivalent
Recommended Preparation: EAS410Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS419H1 - Chinese Cultural Studies Seminar: May Fourth

Hours: 24L

This seminar focuses on the May Fourth Movement in early twentieth century China. Taking May Fourth as a case study and a vantage point, this class enables a critical understanding of various aspects of the cultural and intellectual life in the early Republican period.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS444H1 - The City, Body and Text in Modern Japanese Literature

Hours: 24S

This course examines how the city and body exert formative forces on the text, and how the practice of writing and reading texts informs the ways we, as corporeal beings, experience the city as manifested in the 20th-century Japanese literature.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS263H1/​ EAS230H1/​ EAS235H1/​ EAS256H1/​ EAS257H1/​ EAS284H1/​ EAS284Y1/​ EAS309H1/​ EAS327H1/​ EAS334H1/​ EAS334Y1/​ EAS366H1/​ EAS380H1/​ EAS397H1, or permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS456H1 - Japan as seen by ?: Reference, Apparatus, Operation

Hours: 24S

The course discusses how images of Japan, charged with varied degrees of desire for empirical knowledge, have contributed to contemporary novels and plays by David Mitchell, Ruth L. Ozeki, David Mamet, Joy Kogawa, Kazuo Ishiguro, Marguerite Duras, and David Hwang.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1, or permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS458H1 - Classical Chinese II

Previous Course Number: EAS306Y1
Hours: 24S

As a continuation of EAS358Y1 (formerly EAS206Y1), this course helps students to gain in-depth control of grammatical structures of classical Chinese and to read texts with greater ease. Requirements include a major research/translation project. Open only to EAS majors and specialists.

Prerequisite: EAS358Y1 (minimum 79%)
Exclusion: EAS306Y1, EAS335Y1
Recommended Preparation: Three or more years of Modern Standard Chinese
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS471Y1 - Issues in the Political Economy of South Korea

Hours: 48S

A course designed to guide students toward a research paper on a selected topic of interest on the postwar political economy of South Korea.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS271H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO220Y1 - Introduction to Data Analysis and Applied Econometrics

Hours: 48L/48T

Numerical and graphical data description; data collection and sampling; probability; sampling distributions; statistical inference; hypothesis testing and estimation; simple and multiple regression analysis (extensive coverage). Learn how to analyze data and how to correctly interpret and explain results. Use Excel to analyze a wide variety of data and replicate tables and figures in economics research papers.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(67%)/( ECO101H1(63%), ECO102H1(63%))/ ECO105Y1(80%); MAT133Y1/​( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
Exclusion: GGR270H1, PSY201H1, PSY202H1, SOC300H1, STA220H1, STA221H1, STA247H1, STA248H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3); The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ECO227Y1 - Foundations of Econometrics

Hours: 48L/24T

A rigorous introduction to probability and mathematical statistics intended for economics specialists. Probability and estimation theory, sampling distributions, hypotheses testing, multiple regression analysis. Students will learn the tools used in economics and finance to model and address randomness and uncertainty.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(70%)/( ECO101H1(70%), ECO102H1(70%)); MAT133Y1(63%)/( MAT135H1(60%), MAT136H1(60%))/ MAT137Y1(55%)/ MAT157Y1(55%)
Corequisite: Recommended: MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1, MAT235Y1/​ MAT237Y1/​ ECO210H1
Exclusion: GGR270H1, PSY201H1, SOC300H1, STA247H1, STA248H1, STA255H1, STA257H1, STA261H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ECO230Y1 - International Economic Institutions and Policy

Hours: 48L/24T

This course is intended primarily for students in the International Relations and in the Peace & Conflict Studies programs. The key concepts of international trade and finance are reviewed with an eye to understanding contemporary issues and recommending policy initiatives. Attention is given to empirical assessment of alternative trade theories and to broader international relations issues.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(67%)/( ECO101H1(63%), ECO102H1(63%))/ ECO105Y1(80%)/enrolment in the International Relations Specialist or Major Programs, or the IR/Peace and Conflict Studies joint Specialist Program
Exclusion: ECO364H1/​ ECO365H1/​ECO364H5/ECO365H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO310H1 - Empirical Industrial Organization

Hours: 24L/12T

The quantitative analysis of firms' strategies in real-world industries, using tools from applied microeconomics and statistics. Topics include studies of monopoly, oligopoly, imperfect competition, and the estimation of demand and cost functions that underpin these markets.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO321H1 - Canadian Economic History prior to 1850

Hours: 24L/12T

This course applies the tools of economics - theoretical and empirical - to study Canada's historical growth experiences. Topics include: The variation in well-being among indigenous peoples (both pre and post contact), migration and indentured servitude, colonial money, child labour and education, and the rise of factories. The impact of colonial institutions on Canada’s economic success is studied in a comparative context.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1
Exclusion: ECO323Y5, ECO322Y5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO322H1 - Canadian Economic History, 1850-1960

Hours: 24L/12T

Canadian economic history between 1850 and 1960, with a focus on the debate over the ability of the market mechanism to optimize economic development. Topics covered include tariff policies, Confederation, the transcontinental railroad, opening the West, the Great Depression, monetary policy and the Bank of Canada, regional growth and dominion-provincial relations.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1
Exclusion: ECO323Y5, ECO322Y5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO333H1 - Urban Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Spatial economic theory and urban public policy: firms and individuals in partial and general equilibrium, land development and land-use controls, urban transportation, efficiency and equity in spending and taxing.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO339H1 - Labour Economics: Employment, Wages and Public Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

Using tools from microeconomic theory and statistics, this course introduces students to the study of labour markets, focusing on employment and wage determination, and the application of labour economics to public policy. Topics may include: Labour supply, labour demand, estimating the impact of welfare programs, minimum wages, and other labour market interventions.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO339Y1, ECO343H5, ECO344H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO340H1 - Labour Economics: The Distribution of Earnings

Hours: 24L/12T

Using tools from microeconomic theory and statistics, this course studies the determinants of wages across labour markets. Topics include the theory of compensating differentials, human capital, discrimination, immigration, unions, and alternative models of compensation. In addition, students are introduced to microeconomic models of unemployment. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on the evaluation of empirical evidence.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO339Y1, ECO343H5, ECO344H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO341H1 - The Economic History of the 20th Century: Trade, Migration, Money and Finance before 1945

Hours: 24L/12T

Tailored to advanced students in Economics, Commerce, International Relations and History. The focus is on growth and fluctuations in Europe and North America between roughly 1870 and 1939, with a particular emphasis on international trade and payments, migration, investment, and monetary arrangements.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1/​( ECO230Y1, POL208Y1)
Exclusion: ECO342Y1/​ECO303H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO349H1 - Money, Banking and Financial Markets

Hours: 24L/12T

This course studies the interaction of the monetary and banking sectors with financial markets and the broader economy. It builds especially on tools developed in intermediate macroeconomics, but also focuses on the institutional structure of the Canadian monetary sector, including the role and operation of the Bank of Canada.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA220H1, STA255H1)/( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO348H5/ECO349H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO362H1 - Economic Growth

Hours: 24L/12T

The course considers a broad range of issues that underlie economic growth, including technical progress and the accumulation of human and physical capital. Beyond these factors, the course also investigates the efficiency with which capital is used, the role of foreign trade, and the possible roles of institutions and geography.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO362H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO369H1 - Health Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

The provision of health care provides many special problems of informational asymmetry, regulation, insurance and redistribution. A consideration of the demand and supply side problems. Alternative reform proposals for health care are explored.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO372H1 - Data Analysis and Applied Econometrics in Practice

Hours: 24L/12T

How multiple regression can be used to answer causal questions. Implications of, and how to interpret different model specifications and identification strategies. Students will read, critically evaluate and replicate existing research, and conduct their own original analyses. Statistical software STATA or R will be used.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO351H1 (2016-2017)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO410H1 - Mergers and Competition Policy

Hours: 24L/24T

A combined theoretical, empirical and policy approach to mergers amongst competitors (horizontal mergers). Uses microeconomic models including game theory and econometrics. Delves into recent/current matters assessed by antitrust authorities domestically and/or internationally with applications to specific industries.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1), at least 1.0 ECO FCE at the 300+ level or higher
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO414H1 - Energy and Regulation

Hours: 24L/12T

This course provides a general treatment of the economics of energy markets and the use of regulation in addressing environmental and other issues arising in these markets. A central theme is the search for an appropriate balance between market forces and regulatory/government intervention. Familiarity with tools of microeconomics and statistics/econometrics is essential. Topics include oil, natural gas, coal and electricity markets, global warming and other externalities, networks, feed-in-tariffs, carbon taxes, ‘cap-and-trade’ and incentive regulation.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO416H1 - Macroeconometric Models for Policy Analysis and Forecasting

Hours: 24L/12T

The construction and operation of macroeconometric models. The use of models for conducting policy simulations and for generating quantitative forecasts of economic activity.

Prerequisite: ECO325H1, ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO418H1 - Empirical Applications of Economic Theory

Hours: 24L/12T

Topics class in applied econometrics, emphasizing empirical industrial organization. Emphasis on a balanced treatment of theory and econometric techniques used in empirical research in industrial organization (the study of firms and markets). How firms behave, how market equilibriums arise and how economic policies are used to affect market equilibriums.

Prerequisite: ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO419H1 - International Macroeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

This course studies the causes and consequences of international borrowing and lending and exchange rate fluctuations. We will discuss key empirical facts about these phenomena, develop economic models to understand the forces that drive them, and apply the models to gain insights about a variety of historical contexts like China's rapid economic development and the recent sovereign debt crises in the Eurozone periphery.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO423H1 - Economics and Biosocial Data

Hours: 24L/12T

This course introduces and critically assesses economic research that uses genetic, neuroscientific, and other biosocial data. We will address questions such as: What are the effects of brain neurochemistry on economic decision-making? What role do nature and nurture play in economic behaviour and outcomes? What can we learn from genoeconomics? What are the policy implications (or lack thereof) of related findings? No previous background in biology or genetics is required.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 ECO FCE at the 300+ level
Exclusion: ECO422H1 (Special Topics in Economics: Biology, Genetics and Economics), offered in Winter 2017
Recommended Preparation: ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO433H1 - The Economics of Cities and Regions

Hours: 24L/12T

Broad introduction to modern regional and urban economics. In the first part, we study how and why cities grow and develop. In the second part, we explore how cities interact and why they differ in size and perform different activities. The last part looks at regional development and attempts to understand the determinants of regional inequalities.

Corequisite: ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO438H1 - Topics in Behavioural Economics

Previous Course Number: ECO422H1
Hours: 24L/12T

Behavioural Economics is a relatively new field that incorporates insights gained from psychological, experimental and neuroscientific studies. Research methods adapted from behavioural economics are now being employed in virtually every field in economics. The course will cover the main themes in behavioural economics: individual choices under risk and uncertainty, reference-dependent choices, intertemporal preferences, other-regarding preferences, bounded rationality in individual and interactive decision-making, and the measurement of rationality and recovery of preferences.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​​ ECO204Y1/​​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​​ ECO227Y1/​ ( STA220H1, STA255H1)/​ ( STA237H1, STA238H1)/ ( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Exclusion: ECO422H1 (Special Topics in Economics: Topics in Behavioural Economics), offered in Winter 2018 and Winter 2019
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO465H1 - International Finance

Hours: 24L/12T

An advanced course that addresses topics in in international finance and macroeconomics. Potential topics include: foreign exchange market; exchange rate determination; empirical models of exchange rates; international financial markets and uncertainty; international CAPM and home bias; sovereign debt; optimal capital controls.

Prerequisite: One of the following: ECO365H1 (80%); or ( ECO325H1 (60%) + ECO374H1 (60%)); or ( ECO325H1 (60%) + ECO375H1(60%))
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EEB208H1 - Ecosystems and the Human Footprint

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to the diversity of Earth’s aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems (e.g., coral reefs, lakes, tropical rainforests); the history of industrialization and human population growth; how the human footprint impacts ecosystems (e.g., ecosystem function, biological diversity); and strategies to maintain, recover and restore ecosystems. This is a course for non-science students in all years and disciplines. For non-science students in all years and disciplines.

Exclusion: BIO120H1, ENV200H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB214H1 - Evolution and Adaptation

Hours: 24L/12T

Evolution and adaptation of life on Earth. Introduction to the theory of evolution by natural selection. Topics may include: evidence supporting the fact of evolution, and how evolutionary theory can help explain the world around us, such as how species are formed, and the evolution of sex, infanticide, and disease. For non-science students in all years and disciplines. For non-science students in all years and disciplines.

Exclusion: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB215H1 - Conservation Biology

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to the scientific discipline that deals with threatened species and habitats. Topics include: biodiversity, extinction, threats, demography, genetic diversity, protecting, managing and restoring ecosystems (e.g., nature reserves, captive breeding, conservation corridors), sustainable development, and global warming. Ties between the study of conservation biology and environmental law, economics, and policy will also be covered. For non-science students in all years and disciplines. For non-science students in all years and disciplines.

Exclusion: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB388H1 - Diversity of Mammals

Hours: 24L/36P

Lectures and laboratories examine the natural history, morphology, classification, evolutionary relationships, reproduction, biogeography, and conservation of mammals. Labs focus on the identification of mammals and their diverse morphological adaptations including mammals of Ontario. Lab manual fee: $25.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB397Y1 - Research Project in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

An intermediate research project requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be one mutually agreed on by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. This course is open to highly self-motivated students who are in their Third Year and have a strong interest in ecology and/or evolutionary biology. Students are required to write up the results of their research in a formal paper, often in the format of a research article, and may be required to present the results at a poster session and/or participate in an oral presentation. Students should contact their potential supervisors over the summer before classes begin in September. Information regarding how to register for the course is available on the EEB website. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Note: cannot enrol if already taken the fourth year research project course  EEB498Y1/ EEB499Y1.

Prerequisite: Permission of department
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENG240Y1 - Old English Language and Literature

Hours: 72L

Prepares students to read the oldest English literary forms in the original language. Introduces the earliest English poetry in a woman's voice, expressions of desire, religious fervour, and the agonies of war. Texts, written 680 - 1100, range from the epic of Beowulf the dragon-slayer to ribald riddles.

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG285H1 - The English Language in the World

Hours: 36L

This introductory course surveys transnational, regional, and social varieties of Later Modern English; the linguistic and social factors that have shaped them; their characteristic structures; and their uses in speech and in writing, both literary and non-literary.

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ENG296Y0 - Topics in English Literature

Content varies with Instructor. Offered by the Summer Abroad program, usually in Oxford, England.

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE

ENG297Y0 - Topics in English Literature

Content varies with Instructor. Offered by the Summer Abroad program, usually in Siena, Italy.

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE

ENG300Y1 - Chaucer

Hours: 72L

An in-depth study of Chaucer's major works, including The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG303H1 - Milton

Hours: 36L

Selections from Paradise Lost and other works.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG306Y1 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature

Hours: 72L

A study of selected works by Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, and at least six other authors.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG324Y1 - The Victorian Novel

Hours: 72L

A study of such topics as the comic art of Dickens, Trollope, and Thackeray; the Gothicism of the Brontës; the crisis of religious faith in George Eliot; and the powerful moral fables of Hardy. Students will read 10-12 novels.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG347Y1 - Victorian Literature

Hours: 72L

A survey of major texts in a variety of genres by authors such as Darwin, Tennyson, Browning, Wilde, Nightingale, Christina Rossetti, Kipling.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG378H1 - Special Topics

Hours: 36L

Sustained study in a variety of topics, including: Canadian literature, American literature, Post-1800 British literature, and genres or themes that span across nations and periods. Content varies with instructors. See Department website for current offerings. Course may not be repeated under the same subtitle.

Note: An additional fee of $123 will apply to the "Cook the Books" subtitle offering.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG480H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG481H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG482H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG483H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG484H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG485H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG486H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG487H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG488H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG489H1 - Advanced Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

Seminars are designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills of research and interpretation, and to participate in critical discussion, at a particularly advanced level. All seminars demand substantial class participation and most require an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 ENG FCE (including ENG202H1, ENG203H1, ENG250H1, ENG252H1); and any 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENV200H1 - Assessing Global Change: Science and the Environment

Hours: 24L/4T

The perspective which scientists bring to the understanding and resolution of environmental concerns having global implications: atmospheric systems and climate change, the biosphere and conservation of biodiversity.

This living things and their environment breadth course is intended to fulfill the environmental literacy requirement for students in the BA programs of the School of the Environment or the living things and their environment breadth course requirement for Commerce, Humanities and Social Science students

Exclusion: BIO120H1, EEB208H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV221H1 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Environment

Hours: 24L/4T

One of two foundation courses for the School’s undergraduate program. Introduces students to ways in which different disciplines contribute to our understanding of environment. Instructors and guest lecturers are drawn from the sciences, social sciences and the humanities and will present subject matter, assumptions, conceptualizations and methodologies of their disciplines.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ENV222H1 - Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies

Hours: 24L/4T

Building upon ENV221H1, shows how environmental studies is working to knit different disciplinary perspectives into one interdisciplinary body of knowledge; interplay of science and values in definition and framing of issues; roles of markets, politics and ethics in developing solutions; local to global scale; historical and current timeframes.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV223H1 - Fundamental Environmental Skills

Hours: 24L

The practical, interdisciplinary and controversial nature of environmental issues, as well as the uncertainty that surrounds measures to address them demand mastery of a particular range of skills by environmental students. This course teaches the fundamental research, analysis and presentation skills required for effective environmental work.

Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Environmental Studies major program, or permission of Undergraduate Associate Director.
Exclusion: GGR271H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ENV307H1 - Urban Sustainability

Hours: 36L

This course critically examines the concept of urban sustainability in theory and application. Case studies of ongoing urban sustainability programs in the developed and developing world help students assess the successes and failures of these programs. The course also examines the current state of research and implementation efforts toward urban sustainability. Toronto's urban sustainability and sustainable needs will be investigated through the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) during the course (previous experience with GIS is not required).

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Recommended Preparation: An environmental studies half course.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV320H1 - National Environmental Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

Examines ways in which governments develop and implement policy to protect the environment within their borders. Primarily Canada, plus comparisons with other countries. The focus is upon the politics of environmental policy making, which is understood by examining the interests and powers of the relevant state and non-state actors.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV322H1 - International Environmental Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

Examines the ways in which states negotiate and implement international agreements addressing global environmental issues, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Focus is upon factors which determine the efficacy of multilateral environmental agreements and the prospects for stronger global environmental governance.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV323H1 - Ontario Environmental Policy

Hours: 24S

Introduces students to public policy and institutional foundations of public policy in Canada, with an emphasis on environmental policy in Ontario. Provides an insiders perspective on how environmental policy has been developed in Ontario.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV333H1 - Ecological Worldviews

Hours: 24L

Approaches to environmental concerns are often marked by assumptions that reflect distinct worldviews positing particular understandings of the role of the human with respect to nature. This course explores sundry economic, political, scientific, religious, and moral worldviews pertaining to the environment, including environmental ethics, Gaia, ecofeminism, scientific cosmology, and indigenous perspectives.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ENV335H1 - Environmental Design

Hours: 18L/18P

Environmental design, in the context of this course, refers to design strategies that account for the ability of supporting ecosystems to continue to meet human needs and those of other lifeforms without diminishing biological diversity or environmental quality. This course takes a hands-on approach to investigating several environmental design issues: climate-responsive design, energy consumption, health and comfort, natural lighting and ventilation, and water management. Students will build up a design of a net-zero carbon residential building through several instructive design exercises during the semester.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV337H1 - Human Interactions with the Environment

Hours: 24L/12P

The impact of 7 billion people on the planet is enormous and challenges future generations. What are these impacts today and in future? What solutions and tools can avert societal collapse? Using an integrated and interdisciplinary systems approach, we explore problems and solutions to the earth’s limits to growth.

Prerequisite: (two of ENV233H1, ENV234H1, ENV237H1/​ ENV238H1) or (two of CHM210H1, ENV234H1, ENV237H1/​ ENV238H1, ESS262H1) or ( GGR201H1 + GGR203H1) or ( ENV233H1 + ESS261H1) or ( ESS261H1 + ESS262H1) or ( CHM210H1 + CHM217H1) or ( ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1/​ ENV234H1 + BIO220H1 + BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1) or permission of Undergraduate Associate Director
Exclusion: JGE236H1/​ JEE337H1
Recommended Preparation: Related high school science
Distribution Requirements: Science

ENV341H1 - Environment and Human Health

Hours: 24L

Examination of the linkages between human health and environment. Addresses basic principles and scientific knowledge relating to health and the environment and uses case studies to examine current environmental health issues from a health sciences perspective.

Prerequisite: ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1 or ( BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, and enrolment in the HMB Specialist in Health and Disease/HMB Specialist in Global Health), and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.
Distribution Requirements: Science; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV346H1 - Terrestrial Energy Systems

Hours: 36L/24T

Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large-scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.

Prerequisite: ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ JMB170Y1; BIO120H1/​ CHM136H1/​ CHM138H1/​ CHM135H1/​ CHM139H1/​ CHM151Y1/​ PHY131H1/​ PHY132H1/​ PHY151H1/​ PHY152H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ENV347H1 - The Power of Economic Ideas

Hours: 24L

This course examines the power of economic ideas in effecting environmental change. Topics include the relation of ecological economics to mainstream economics, as well as the role of financial incentives to move the environmental agenda forward.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV350H1 - Energy Policy and Environment

Hours: 24L

The course addresses: (1) physical, technological and economic aspects of energy and electricity systems and their associated environmental impacts; (2) current international, Canadian and Ontario energy policy; (3) technological, economic and political factors influencing policy which could significantly reduce environmental impacts of energy use.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV382H1 - Special Topics in Environment

Hours: 24L

Special topics course designed for students in School of the Environment programs. Content in any given year depends on instructor. Will be offered in 2019-20 on the subject area of religion and environment. See School of the Environment website for more details.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 9.0 FCEs to register for the course.
Exclusion: BIG101Y1 if ENV382H1 taken in 2015-16 or 2016-17
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ENV421H1 - Environmental Research

Hours: 24S

A research course for all students in the School combining report writing, independent and group-based research on an interdisciplinary topic. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 10.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; and enrolment in one of the Environmental Studies Major, Environmental Ethics Major, Environment & Health Specialist, Environmental Chemistry Specialist or Environment & Toxicology Specialist programs; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV422H1 - Environmental Law

Hours: 24S

An introduction to environmental law for students in Environmental Studies; legal methods available to resolve environmental problems and the scope and limits of those methods; common law and statutory tools as well as environmental assessment legislation; the problem of standing to sue and the limits of litigation.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV431H1 - Urban Sustainability & Ecological Technology

Hours: 24L

Ecological technology or green infrastructure encompasses those technologies that incorporate ecosystems to replace mechanical or non-living components in a machine or a piece of infrastructure. Complex systems theory and second-law thermodynamics are used as a template to explore concepts of urban sustainability, and the role of ecological technology in this context.

Prerequisite: ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1, or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV432H1 - Urban Ecology

Hours: 24L/12S

The ecology of urban areas through consideration of the biological and physical environments, in particular how the human-constructed environment alters pre-existing biophysical conditions and interactions. Encompasses a comparative perspective to study the development of these emerging ecosystems of increasing importance given global urbanization. One or two Saturday field trips (a fee of approximately $15 may be charged for field trip transportation.)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1 and at least one of EEB319H1/​ EEB321H1/​ EEB365H1/​ ENV334H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV440H1 - Professional Experience Course

Hours: 10S

Regular academic seminars complement off-campus work on an environmental project. The course enables students to gain practical experience of the needs and demands of professional environmental agencies. Students are given a choice of placements in a variety of sectors (such as government, NGOs, industry).

Eligible students who wish to do a work placement in the upcoming summer or fall session are must submit an application form to the Placement Coordinator by mid-January of each year. Please contact the School of the Environment’s Placement Coordinator, David Powell, at ug.office.env@utoronto.ca, or consult the School’s undergraduate courses webpage for access to the application form, instructions and application deadline.

Prerequisite: 10 full courses or their equivalent, including three FCE of environmental courses in the student's environmental program completed before ENV440H1 taken; or permission of Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV450H1 - Energy and Environment Solutions

Hours: 12T/24S

This is an interdisciplinary course in which students address current energy problems while incorporating technical, environmental, economic, social, and political concerns.

Prerequisite: ENV346H1, ENV350H1 and any two of FOR310H1/​ GGR310H1/​ GGR314H1/​ GGR347H1/​ GGR348H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV451H1 - Current Environmental Topics

Hours: 24S

This capstone course for the School’s core programs will explore current environmental topics, with the goal of integrating the multi- and interdisciplinary strands of each student's learning to date.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1, and enrolment in one of the School's BA programs; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV461H1 - The U of T Campus as a Living Lab of Sustainability

Hours: 24L

Sustainability is a growing priority for universities all over the world. Many are developing strong operational sustainability goals and targets, and are giving increasing emphasis to teaching and research on sustainability issues. Yet few have committed at the executive level to integrating academic and operational sustainability in the context of treating their campus as a living laboratory of sustainable practice, research and teaching. Arguably, it is such living lab approaches that offer the largest potential for universities to play a significant role in the sustainability transition. This course will explore and apply the living lab concept, in the context of operational sustainability at the University of Toronto. We will begin by looking at the literature on university sustainability and the living lab concept. The bulk of the course will involve undertaking an applied research project on some aspect of campus sustainability, working in close partnership with operational staff at the University of Toronto. Students will develop the skills needed to work across disciplines and fields of study, and with non-academic partners. This course will put students to work on operational sustainability projects identified by the staff working in or with the Sustainability Office at the University of Toronto. Students will be organized into groups, each of which will be assigned one project, to be overseen by one or more U of T staff members. The bulk of the course will consist of regular meetings with the staff “clients”, with instructors, and in small groups to undertake a group project. Each group will produce a mid-term and final report, and give a mid-term and final presentation. Each student will also submit two 360 reviews of the group process. A crucial aspect of this course is the ability of students to work collaboratively together in a group environment, and to work effectively with a university staff person acting as a “client” for their work. Students will be provided with a Handbook outlining information on working in groups and the focus of the class in the second week will be on this issue. The first 360 peer review will serve to provide information on how well each group is working. Students are encouraged to discuss and resolve group process issues in the weekly group meetings, and in their regular meetings with the instructor and TA. The second 360 review will occur at the end of the term. The results of the two 360 reviews will be used, where appropriate, to adjust individual marks from the group averages.

Prerequisite: Completion of 10.0 FCE including ENV221H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Exclusion: ENV481H1 if taken in 2016-17
Recommended Preparation: 1.0 FCE of environment-related coursework
Distribution Requirements: Social Science; Science; Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV492H1 - Independent Studies Project

A research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 14.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1, and enrolment in a School of the Environment program
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ENV493H1 - Independent Studies Project

A research project or selected topic in an area of environment not otherwise available in the Faculty, meant to develop skills in independent study of interdisciplinary topics. A written proposal co-signed by the student and supervisor must be submitted for approval by the Academic Associate Director of the School normally one month prior to commencing the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of 14.0 FCE including ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1, and enrolment in a School of the Environment program
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ESS205H1 - Confronting Global Change

Hours: 24L/8T

The emergence of society as a major geological force is considered in terms of the evolving debate about the consequences of human activity for the habitability of our planet. Major issues such as climate change, environmental pollution, and depletion of natural resources are examined.

Exclusion: GLG205H1, ERS321H5, ENV200H1, EEB208H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ESS234H1 - Introduction to Geological Field Methods

Previous Course Number: ESS330H1

A two-week field course in early May or late August. Students are introduced to field geology and to basic field measurement, mapping and documentation techniques (for example in the Espanola - Manitoulin Island area, west of Sudbury). Students are responsible for the cost of board and lodging and transport to and from the field area. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Note: Enrollment is handled by the department. For registration deadlines, additional fees associated with the field course, course dates, and special registration requirements, please consult the departmental announcements or inquire with ugrad@es.utoronto.ca.

Prerequisite: ESS222H1, ESS241H1, ESS262H1
Exclusion: ESS330H1, GLG340H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS311H1 - Earth System Chemistry 2: Aqueous Geochemistry

Hours: 24L/24P

An introduction to aqueous environmental geochemistry emphasising the importance of chemical equilibria, mass transport, and microbiological activity in regulating the chemical composition of natural and contaminated systems.

Prerequisite: ESS223H1/​ ENV233H1
Exclusion: GLG351H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS345H1 - Computational Geology

Hours: 24L/1T/24P

A practical introduction to programming. This course will teach an operational knowledge on how to write and execute self written computer programs. Course topics touch upon using a computer without a graphical interface, using an integrated development environment, programming, documenting, debugging, reading and writing data, graphical output, how to navigate existing documentation and internet resources, and last but not least how to effectively ask for help. Students will work individually and in small groups in an inverted classroom setting on earth science related problem sets. Previous programming experience is not required, however curiosity, independence and perseverance are mandatory.

Prerequisite: 2 FCEs from first-year math, chemistry or physics courses; 2 FCEs of earth sciences courses
Exclusion: GLG204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS361H1 - Atmosphere-Biosphere Interact

Hours: 24L

Theory on the exchange of energy and matter (carbon, water) between the land surface and atmosphere, with a focus on the implications of ecosystem-level processes for regional micrometeorology. Examples will be taken from research on contemporary as well as palaeoclimate systems. Case studies to include how changes in vegetation type alter surface radiation balance, hydrological cycling and heat transfer in soils. There is no formal textbook for this course. Lecture material will be augmented with assigned readings from the scientific literature.

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCE`s, including 1 FCE from PHY131H1/​ PHY132H1/​ CHM135H1/​ CHM136H1/​ CHM138H1/​ CHM139H1/​ MAT135H1/​ MAT136H1
Exclusion: GGR303H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ESS425H1 - Advanced Methods in the Geosciences

Hours: 24L/36P

This course provides an in-depth exploration of methods which are commonly used in the Geosciences. The course content will vary from year to year; students should inquire with the Department about course topics and pre-requisites before the beginning of the Fall term. Topics taught in this course include, but are not limited to, laboratory analytical techniques (such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, stable isotopes, light and scanning electron microscopy and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry), core logging, computational techniques including modeling, statistical methods, or spatial analysis tools for geological mapping applications such as plotting cross sections or correlating biostratigraphies.

Prerequisite: 8 FCEs of Earth Sciences courses
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS441H1 - Advanced Structural Geology

Hours: 24L/24P

Principles of geological mechanics: stress, strain, rheology. Faulting, folding and development of tectonic foliations and lineations. Structural analysis of fractures, folds and tectonites.

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCE of ESS courses including ESS222H1, ESS234H1, ESS241H1, ESS331H1
Recommended Preparation: ESS345H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS464H1 - Biological Perspectives on Earth System Evolution

Hours: 24L

A seminar course focussing on ways that the Earth's biosphere (terrestrial and marine) has altered the overall functioning of the Earth System over geological time, including (1) influence of terrestrial vegetation on surface processes such as palaeosol development, river geomorphology, erosion, and cycling of major biogeochemical nutrients on land, (2) influence of the marine biosphere on the concentration of O2 and CO2 in the atmosphere, including the origin of the stratospheric ozone layer, and (3) the interactive influence of the terrestrial and marine biosphere on atmospheric moisture transport, production of latent relative to sensible heat fluxes, and the development of the planetary boundary layer. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite: ESS261H1/​ ESS262H1, ESS361H1/​ ESS362H1/​ GGR305H1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ESS490H1 - Geological Capstone Fieldtrip

A two-week excursion to a challenging field setting. Students will integrate field observations with their accumulated knowledge of geodynamics, structural geology, and landscape evolution to understand large-scale geological events. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. This course will be offered in the summer session of 2020. Note: Enrollment is handled by the department. For registration deadlines, additional fees associated with the field course, course dates, and special registration requirements, please consult the departmental announcements or inquire with ugrad@es.utoronto.ca.

Prerequisite: At least 12 FCE of any Earth Science program of study requirements, or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: GLG420H1
Recommended Preparation: ESS221H1, ESS222H1, ESS234H1, ESS331H1, ESS423H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

EUR498H1 - Special Topics in European Studies: European Union

Hours: 24L

What is the European Union? Which are its core institutions and how do they work? What is the scope of its directives and programs, and how do they fit in with the member-states’ policies? What is the role of the EU as an international actor? This course on Special Topics in European Studies aims at answering all these questions. The course will start with an introduction to integration in Europe, the development of the EU, and some theories and approaches to its study. It will then review the main political, economic, and judiciary institutions in the EU. Last, it will examine some important policy areas and challenges at the European level, including migration and asylum, social cohesion, counterterrorist initiatives, scenarios after Brexit, relations between the EU and its neighbours, and foreign policy. Special care will be given to explaining the political interaction between the EU institutions and the member-states, on the one hand, and the EU’s Directives and policy frameworks and the members’ policies, on the other hand.

Prerequisite: Completion of 12.0 FCEs including EUR200Y1 and one of POL207Y1/​ POL359Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

FAH207H1 - Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology

Hours: 24L

An overview of the major monuments, artifacts, themes and problems in the study of the archaeology, art and architecture of the civilizations of Greece and Rome.

Exclusion: FAH101Y5/FAH203H5/FAH204H5/ XBC199Y1 L0211
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH216H1 - Later Medieval Art and Architecture

Hours: 24L

An overview of major monuments and themes in the art and architecture of Western Europe and the Byzantine East from the eleventh until the fifteenth century.

Exclusion: FAH102Y5/FAH267H5/FAH271H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH230H1 - Renaissance Art and Architecture

Hours: 24L

A selective survey of the major art centres and types of artistic and architectural production in Italy and northern Europe, from the early fifteenth century to the mid-sixteenth. Themes include the relations--artistic, economic and ideological--between northern and southern Europe during this period, the changing role of art in religious life, the emergence of secular themes, and the legacies left by Renaissance art to modern life and culture.

Exclusion: FAH200Y5/FAH274H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH231H1 - Baroque Art and Architecture

Hours: 24L

Major forms of expression in the visual arts ca. 1600 - ca. 1750 with particular attention to forms, techniques, theories, and patronage of the arts as well as biographies of artists in Italy, France, the Netherlands, Flanders, Germany and England.

Exclusion: FAH200Y5/FAH279H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH245H1 - Modernism and anti-Modernism, c. 1750-1900

Hours: 24L

An introduction to the advent and development of art movements including Rococo and Neoclassicism; Romanticism and Revolution, Realism and the advent of Photography, Impressionism; Academic art; Post-Impressionism.

Exclusion: FAH287H5
Recommended Preparation: FAH102H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH246H1 - Art Since 1900

Hours: 24L

An introduction to the consolidation of Modernist tendencies in Europe to the mid 20th century and to the many contemporary responses to these achievements. Individual artists, including Picasso, Matisse, Duchamp, and Matthew Barney are considered in their relationship to various art movements and the theories that supported them, including Expressionism; Abstraction and Constructivism; Dada and Surrealism; Neue Sachlichkeit; Abstract Expressionism; Pop; Conceptual Art; Earth Art; Feminist Art; Postmodernism; New Media Art.

Exclusion: FAH288H5/FAH289H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH248H1 - Canadian Painting 1665-1960

Hours: 24L

An introductory survey of the history of painting in Canada from the 17th to the 20th century.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH260H1 - The Artistic Landscape of East Asia

Hours: 24L

An overview of major monuments and themes in the art and architecture of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Mongolia and Tibet), from the neolithic to the present.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH272H1 - Modern Architecture from 1750 to the Present

Hours: 24L

An introduction to the buildings, issues and ideas from Neoclassicism to the present.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH303H1 - Emergence of Greek Civilisation

Hours: 24L

This course investigates the material culture, art and architecture of the Aegean civilizations from the Neolithic through to the building of the palaces of Crete around 2000BC.

Prerequisite: FAH207H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH309H1 - City of Rome

Hours: 24L

The art, architecture and archaeology of the city of Rome to AD476.

Prerequisite: FAH207H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH312H1 - Art of the Hellenistic Age

Hours: 24L

Transformation in the visual arts, paintings, sculpture, and mosaics of the expanding Greek world c. 400BC to c. 100BC; the response to Hellenization from the new artistic centres of Asia Minor and Italy.

Prerequisite: FAH207H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH318H1 - Monastic Art and Architecture

Hours: 24L

An examination of the role played by monks and nuns in the creation and use of art and architecture in the Middle Ages.

Prerequisite: FAH215H1/​ FAH216H1/​FAH454H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH319H1 - Illuminated Manuscripts

Hours: 24L

A focused survey of different types of manuscripts and their images from the origins of the book in Late Antiquity to the invention of printing.

Prerequisite: FAH215H1/​ FAH216H1
Recommended Preparation: SMC358H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH327H1 - Secular Art and Architecture of the Middle Ages

Hours: 24L

A consideration of art and architecture made for the court, the aristocracy, and other patrons outside the realm of the Christian church.

Prerequisite: FAH215H1/​ FAH216H1/​FAH337H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH328H1 - Gothic Cathedral

Hours: 24L

An examination of the Gothic cathedral from its origins in Paris in the 1130’s through its development and elaboration in France, England and Italy. This course also considers monumental decorations in painted glass, wall painting, tapestry and portal sculpture.

Prerequisite: FAH215H1/​ FAH216H1/​FAH351H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH330H1 - German Art and Architecture in the Age of Dürer

Hours: 24L

Albrecht Dürer and the painting and printmaking of his contemporaries. Consideration of the great Hall churches of Saxony and the altarpieces of Tilman Riemenschneider and his contemporaries; the status of the arts and attitudes towards Italian art, and the consequences of the Reformation for religious imagery.

Prerequisite: FAH230H1/​ FAH231H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH331H1 - Netherlandish Renaissance Art and Culture

Hours: 24L

Painting, sculpture and architecture of the Netherlands in the sixteenth century with reference to the arts in Italy, France, Germany and Spain. Consideration of Netherlandish art in the context of literature, religion, urban expansion, political and economic developments; and as a system of communication. Particular attention devoted to Hieronymus Bosch, Pieter Bruegel, the rise of secular art.

Prerequisite: FAH230H1/​ FAH231H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH335H1 - The Art of Love in the Renaissance

Hours: 24L

Love is studied not only as a favorite theme of Renaissance art, but as the basis of some of its fundamental aesthetic claims. The question of love connects Renaissance art to important strains of philosophical thought and religious spirituality, as well as to some urgent realities of social life.

Prerequisite: FAH230H1/​ FAH231H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH340H1 - 17th-Century Art of the Netherlands

Hours: 24L

Concentration on the major painters of Holland’s Golden Age, ca. 1580-ca. - 1700. Particular attention is paid to genre painting and the notion of “Dutch realism.” Consideration of art within its social and political contexts. Notions of gender, of the historical past, of embodiment, and of contact with the non-western world will be discussed.

Prerequisite: FAH230H1/​ FAH231H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH341H1 - Venetian Renaissance Art and Architecture

Hours: 24L

Form and meaning, theory and practice of painting and architecture in Venice, ca. 1450-ca. 1600. Social, political and cultural contexts of making and viewing art, including works by Giorgione, Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto and Palladio.

Prerequisite: FAH230H1/​ FAH231H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH344H1 - Rembrandt, Rubens and their Age

Hours: 24L

Introduction to the art of Rembrandt and Rubens in the context of Netherlandish painting of the seventeenth century. Lectures will treat the approaches of these two artists to biblical and mythological subjects, landscape, portraiture, and their involvement in contemporary politics.

Recommended Preparation: FAH101H1/​ FAH102H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH345H1 - The Romantic Movement in French Art

Hours: 24L

This course explores the painting, sculpture, and graphic arts of the Romantic era in France, from abOUT 1820 to 1850. Major emphasis on Gericault, Delacroix, and Ingres in their artistic, cultural, and political context. Key topics in Romanticism, including Orientalism and gender, are also explored.

Prerequisite: FAH245H1/​ FAH246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH346H1 - Impressionism

Hours: 24L

The origin and development of Impressionism in France and Europe, 1860-1886, in its social, political and intellectual context. Painting, graphics and sculpture by Monet, Renoir, Degas, Pissarro, Sisley, Cassatt and Morisot.

Prerequisite: FAH245H1/​ FAH246H1
Exclusion: FAH378H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH347H1 - Cubism and Related Movements

Hours: 24L

An investigation of the birth and development of Cubism, Futurism and Orphism in Europe and North America.

Prerequisite: FAH245H1/​ FAH246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH348H1 - The Dada and Surrealist Tradition

Hours: 24L

The origins and development of the Dada and Surrealist movements in early 20th-century Western art, and their lasting impact on art after World War II. Painting, sculpture, graphic arts, and the theoretical preoccupation which accompanied artistic production.

Prerequisite: FAH245H1/​ FAH246H1
Exclusion: FAH447H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH349H1 - Abstraction in Twentieth-Century Art

Hours: 24L

The origins, development, and critical issues pertaining to abstract or non-figurative modes of art as manifested in painting, sculpture and other selected media upt to the present time. Movements include European abstract art before World War II as well as post-war developments.

Prerequisite: FAH102H1/​ FAH245H1/​ FAH246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH350H1 - Minimalism

Hours: 24L

An investigation of the different definitions and issues of minimal art including seriality, materials, process, objecthood, chance, installation, reception, relations to music and film, and the influence of structuralism.

Prerequisite: FAH102H1/​ FAH245H1/​ FAH246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH354H1 - Art in Canada Since the 1960s

Hours: 24L

An examination of the visual arts in Canada from the 1960’s to the present. A large and diverse range of media, practices, artists, and theoretical contexts will be examined. Emphasis is placed on work that can be seen in the original.

Prerequisite: FAH101H1/​ FAH102H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH363H1 - The Mechanics of the Image in China

Hours: 24L

East Asian images differ from Western ones in material support, format, and technologies of image-making. This course probes how East Asian images -- painting on objects, handscrolls, prints, optical media, film, and new media – work.

Prerequisite: Any 200 level FAH half course/ANY 100 or 200 level EAS Society-Culture course
Recommended Preparation: FAH260H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH370H1 - European Renaissance Architecture

Hours: 24L

Architecture and architectural theory ca. 1400 – ca. 1600.

Prerequisite: FAH270H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH371H1 - Architecture and Urbanism in Baroque Europe

Hours: 24L

Architecture studied through its various building types and in its urban context. Themes include architecture and power under Absolutism, and the rise of the modern city.

Prerequisite: FAH270H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH372H1 - Architecture in the Age of Historicism ca. 1750-ca. 1900

Hours: 24L

Major monuments and key figures in architecture and urbanism in Europe and North America from the Enlightenment to the birth of Modernism.

Prerequisite: FAH270H1/​ FAH272H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH373H1 - Modern Architecture Since 1890

Hours: 24L

Major monuments and key figures in architecture and urbanism from Industrialization to the mid-twentieth century. Topics may include architectural theory, colonialism, and new technologies.

Prerequisite: FAH270H1/​ FAH272H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH374H1 - Consequences of Modernism: Architecture after 1945

Hours: 24L

An examination of architectural theory and practice from the end of Modernism to the present.

Prerequisite: FAH270H1/​ FAH272H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH380H1 - Special Topics in Art History

Hours: 24L

The study of various aesthetic, cultural, social, political, and theoretical aspects of Western art and photography across the centuries.

Prerequisite: Two FAH half courses or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH381H1 - Problems in Jewish Art

Hours: 24L

This course investigates the changing definition of Jewish art and the status of Jewish artists. Other issues explored include Jewish-Christian visual polemics, the construction of individual and communal Jewish identity through art, architecture, and texts, and the conceptual transformation of Jewish craft and ritual objects into art.

Recommended Preparation: FAH102H1, a 200 level FAH half course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH420H1 - Studies in Western Medieval Art and Architecture

Hours: 24S

In-depth examination of monuments and issues in the art and architecture of Western Europe from the sixth to the fifteenth century.

Prerequisite: FAH215H1/​ FAH216H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH421H1 - Studies in Medieval Cities

Hours: 24S

A focused examination of urbanism, art and architecture of a specific medieval city, such as Jerusalem, Rome, Constantinople, or Paris.

Prerequisite: FAH215H1/​ FAH216H1
Recommended Preparation: FAH327H1/​ FAH328H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH424H1 - Studies in Medieval Book Illumination

Hours: 24S

A consideration of individual types of books, their decoration, function, and cultural context. Topics might include, for example, Gospels, Psalters, or Books of Hours.

Prerequisite: FAH215H1/​ FAH216H1
Recommended Preparation: FAH319H1/​ SMC358H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH430H1 - Pieter Bruegel

Hours: 24S

The study of Pieter Bruegel’s works in the context of Netherlandish culture. Emphasis on secular works.

Prerequisite: FAH331H1; permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: Reading knowledge of French or German
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH440H1 - Dutch Genre Painting of the 17th Century

Hours: 24S

Study of so-called “scenes of everyday life.” Special attention given to cultural context and problems of constructions of gender and gendered relationships, of social and economic interests, of class conflict, of the relationship with broader European culture. Considerable attention will be paid to the work of Jan Vermeer.

Prerequisite: FAH331H1/​ FAH340H1; permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: Reading knowledge of French or German
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH445H1 - The Paris Salon and French Art of the Nineteenth Century

Hours: 24S

French painting, sculpture, and criticism of the mid-19th century, with particular to the key role played by the Paris Salon: its emergence and decline as a public space for exhibitions, its impact on the shape of artistic careers, and the relation between the Salon and artistic practices. Attention both to Modernist artists, such as Manet, and to their opponents. Students will engage in critical readings of primary and secondary texts (Baudelaire, T. J. Clark, Michael Fried), as well as conduct original research on important Salon paintings and sculptures. Assignments will include a book review, an annotated bibliography, and a research paper.

Prerequisite: FAH245H1
Recommended Preparation: FAH346H1/​ FAH345H1. Reading knowledge of French strongly recommended.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH447H1 - 19th-Century Landscape Painting

Hours: 24S

Investigation of English, French, German and Swiss landscape painting from the birth of the Romantic movement to Post-Impressionism.

Prerequisite: FAH245H1
Recommended Preparation: Reading knowledge of French or German
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH448H1 - International Art Since 1940

Hours: 24S

Developments in the mainstream of Western painting and sculpture since World War II with special emphasis upon interrelations between Europe and North America.

Prerequisite: FAH246H1/​ FAH348H1/​ FAH350H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH449H1 - Contemporary Art Movements

Hours: 24S

Selected aspects of the complex array of international contemporary art movements, their artists, objects, and critical discourses. Potential issues include the theoretical, philosophical, and political concerns addressed by given artworks and artists; the role of art journals, the private patron, and museum display.

Prerequisite: FAH246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH457H1 - Issues in Canadian Art, ca. 1900-1940

Hours: 24S

Focused, thematic examinations of the visual arts in Canada in the first half of the twentieth century.

Prerequisite: FAH248H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH458H1 - Issues in Recent Canadian Art

Hours: 24S

Focused, thematic examinations of the visual arts in Canada from c. 1960 to the present.

Prerequisite: FAH354H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH462H1 - Outside East Asian Art

Hours: 24S

Methodologically- and historiographically-focused seminar that attends to the contiguities and ruptures of approaching East Asian art through Western art historical methods.

Prerequisite: FAH260H1/​ FAH262H1/​ FAH360H1/​ FAH363H1/​ FAH364H1/​ FAH368H1/​ EAS211Y0/ EAS227Y/ EAS233H1/​ EAS237Y1/​ EAS305Y1/​ EAS331Y1/​ EAS418H1; permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH463H1 - Materiality, Objecthood, Connoisseurship and Collecting in the Arts of East Asia

Hours: 24S

Seminar based on firsthand examination of East Asian objects in Toronto collections that attends to the historical processes by which such objects were valued and collected.

Prerequisite: FAH260H1/​ FAH262H1/​ FAH360H1/​ FAH363H1/​ FAH364H1/​ FAH368H1/​ EAS211Y0/ EAS227Y/ EAS233H1/​ EAS237Y1/​ EAS305Y1/​ EAS331Y1; permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH464H1 - Transregional East Asian Art

Hours: 24S

In-depth examination of the play of East Asian Art within and beyond East Asia.

Prerequisite: FAH260H1/​ FAH262H1/​ FAH360H1/​ FAH363H1/​ FAH364H1/​ FAH368H1/​ EAS211Y0/ EAS227Y/ EAS233H1/​ EAS237Y1/​ EAS305Y1/​ EAS331Y1; permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH465H1 - Exhibiting China

Hours: 24S

This seminar teaches students the skills required to curate an exhibition of Chinese materials. Working firsthand with objects of Chinese art and visual culture in local Toronto collections, students learn to document the object, assess authenticity, write object labels, panel texts, and catalogue essays. Students will thus prepare an exhibition, actual or virtual, of Chinese objects in local collections.

Prerequisite: FAH260H1/​ FAH262H1/​ FAH360H1/​ FAH363H1/​ FAH364H1/​ FAH368H1/​ EAS211Y0/ EAS227Y/ EAS233H1/​ EAS237Y1/​ EAS305Y1/​ EAS331Y1; permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: Two additional courses in Chinese/East Asian art
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH470H1 - Studies in Renaissance and Baroque Architecture

Hours: 24S

An in-depth study of themes and problems in architecture in Renaissance and Baroque Europe.

Prerequisite: FAH370H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH480H1 - University Art Centre Exhibition Course

Hours: 24S

Students work together designing and installing an exhibition of works of art, normally drawn from the collections of the University Art Centre. The course meets every two weeks at the University Art Centre over the entire academic year.

Prerequisite: 8 FAH half courses; permission of instructor (application in department)
Exclusion: FAH451H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH481H1 - Internship

Hours: 24S

The internship is designed to offer hands-on experience pertaining to the study, exhibition, and care of works of art, focused on the collections and activities of the University Art Centre, an auction house, a public museum, or a private gallery. Students must provide proof of their acceptance as an intern by the Art Centre/auction house/museum/gallery in order to be enrolled in the course. This course is Pass/Fail. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 8 FAH half courses; permission of instructor (application in department)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH481Y1 - Internship

Hours: 48S

The internship is designed to offer hands-on experience pertaining to the study, exhibition, and care of works of art, focused on the collections and activities of the University Art Centre, an auction house, a public museum, or a private gallery. Students must provide proof of their acceptance as an intern by the Art Centre/auction house/museum/gallery in order to be enrolled in the course. This course is Pass/Fail. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 8 FAH half courses; permission of instructor (application in department)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH483H1 - Introduction to Conservation: Materials, Deterioration, and Preservation in Art and Material Culture

Hours: 24S

An introduction to conservation, designed to give students a basic understanding of the field, its techniques, and its purposes. Sessions conducted by specialists in the Royal Ontario Museum conservation department.

Prerequisite: 8 FAH half courses; permission of instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH484H1 - Fashion, & Textiles: Culture & Consumption

Hours: 24S

This course examines the history, meaning and consumption of Western European textiles (Late Antique - 18th century) and fashionable dress (18th - 21st centuries). Analysis and research will combine student seminars with the study of actual artefacts in the Textile & Costume Collection of the Royal Ontario Museum.

Prerequisite: 8 half FAH courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FAH485H1 - Collecting Canada: Canadian Pictorial Arts Collection at the Royal Ontario Museum

Hours: 24S

Theoretical and practical engagement with the ROM's Canadian paintings, prints and drawing collections (18th-20th C). Through lectures, workshops, and seminars, we consider the collecting, interpretation, and display of images within the framework of “documentary art” and its various connotations.

Prerequisite: FAH248H1, 2.0 300-level FAH courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FCS369Y0 - The Culture of Touraine

Hours: 48L

This course will offer a unique opportunity to study the culture of the Touraine region while living an experience of complete immersion in Tours, a city located in the Loire Valley, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the seat of power of the French monarchy until the 17th Century. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (Not offered in Summer 2019)

Prerequisite: At least 5 course credits in any subject
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FIN230H1 - Finnish Culture 1800 to Present

Hours: 12L/12P

FIN230H1 offers an introduction to Finnish society, history and culture from 1800 to present. The course examines the rise of Finnish nationalism in the 1800s, its main manifestations, and concentrates on the developments of its cultural, educational and social institutions, its economic structures, demographics, cultural traditions as well as the nation’s bilingual status. The focus is on contemporary themes placed in a wider societal context.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

FIN250H1 - Finnish Cinema

Hours: 12P/24S

The course offers a survey of development of Finnish cinema from its parochial beginnings to its international recognition with a focus on contemporary themes. Selected films with different themes and topics will be screened and analysed. Readings and subtitles in English. (Offered in alternate years)

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FOR416H1 - Green Urban Infrastructure

Hours: 24L

Trees in and around the city are key to providing multiple engineered and ecological services that only recently have been brought into the responsible fiscal planning of every municipality around the globe. Reviews the role of trees and woodlands in providing environmental, social and economic benefits to urban and peri-urban residents and to the broader environment. Examines approaches to the characterization of urban forest ecosystems, and their planning and management.

Prerequisite: FOR200H1, FOR201H1
Exclusion: FOR421H1 (APSC)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

FRE226H1 - Tools and Strategies for Learners of French

Hours: 36L/12T

This course provides learners with an understanding of how one best acquires French as a second or third language including tools and strategies that allow for effective, autonomous learning. Students will first learn about the types of knowledge and sub-skills that must be acquired to master French including vocabulary and grammar as well as the four main competences (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). They will then receive practical training in the use of online resources including French language corpora and automatic assessment tools.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment, equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test.
Exclusion: FRE225Y1, any FSL 300+ courses and higher.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE245H1 - Introduction to French Cultural and Literary Studies

Previous Course Number: FRE240H1
Hours: 36L/12T

This course is a practical introduction to concepts, methods and problems of literary analysis as well as an overview of French artistic culture. Using elements of comparison from fine arts, contemporary and popular culture (including novels and movies) and a variety of emblematic works of French and Francophone literatures (among others: essays by Voltaire, Montesquieu and Simone de Beauvoir; poems by Ronsard, Hugo, Baudelaire and Césaire; excerpts from novels by George Sand, Albert Camus and Patrick Chamoiseau), its objective is to provide students with a practical introduction to the tools of literary analysis, but also to help them better read, understand and appreciate literary texts.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment, equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test.
Exclusion: FRE240H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE384H1 - Teaching French as a Second Language

Hours: 24L

This course provides an introduction to recent methods and pedagogical materials published in France and Canada. Emphasis is put on the various approaches in teaching French as a Second Language, with reference to theoretical issues and historical background.

Prerequisite: FRE226H1/​ FRE225Y1, FRE272H1, FSL321Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE487H1 - Advanced Topics in Bilingualism and L2 acquisition

Hours: 24S

This course examines how adult learners acquire segmental and prosodic aspects of French phonetics and phonology in both perception and production. It also provides in-depth, practical training in methodological design and quantitative analysis culminating in students’ undertaking of individual experimental studies.

Prerequisite: FRE376H1 + FRE378H1 + FRE383H1 + FRE388H1/​ JFG388H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FSL221Y1 - French Language II

Hours: 48L/48T

Intended for those who have some knowledge of French, this course is the first in a proficiency-sequenced series that provides students with the opportunity to become proficient, focused, autonomous French language learners. Adopting a principally actional approach to second language learning targeting Level A2 objectives of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), the course’s main objective is to provide a communicative learning environment through activities based in real-world, everyday contexts.

Prerequisite: FSL121Y1 or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment, equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test.
Exclusion: Any FSL 300-level course and higher
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL271H1 - French Grammar, within Reason

Hours: 36L

An introduction to basic concepts of the French grammar from an analytic and descriptive point of view. Exploration of traditional grammar concepts such as subject, predicate, complement. This course provides understanding of the logic that is often hidden by the apparent complexity of grammatical rules.

Prerequisite: FSL121Y1 or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment, equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test
Exclusion: Any FSL 300-level course and higher.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL312H1 - Writing French: the Language of the Media

Previous Course Number: FSL362H1
Hours: 36L

Using current online French media, broaden your understanding of the French language; deepen your grammatical knowledge; expand your vocabulary (including idioms); review key aspects of French syntax; and fine-tune your reading skills in French. Weekly reading and writing workshops are an integral part of this course.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 (63%) or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test.
Exclusion: FSL321Y1 and higher
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL313H1 - French for the Workplace

Previous Course Number: FSL363H1
Hours: 36L

This course is designed to enhance students’ existing knowledge of French by giving them a theoretical as well as a practical foundation in the use of French language in the workplace. Special emphasis will be placed on the appropriate vocabulary used within the context of communication in the Francophone workplace. Students will learn how to communicate in a variety of professional contexts as well as how to distinguish between the formal and informal styles of French suitable for diverse situations in the workplace. This course also aims to help students acquire intercultural skills needed in the Francophone workplace.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 (63%) or, upon first FRE/FSL, enrolment equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test
Exclusion: Any FSL 300-level course and higher
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL314H1 - French for the Arts

Previous Course Number: FSL364H1
Hours: 36L

Introduction to the study of central themes in French artistic expression, designed to familiarize students with key concepts and vocabularies relevant to the subject. Study of modes of artistic representation, (visual, performing arts) and their contribution to the rich heritage and identity of French culture. Observation, description and analysis of various artistic mediums.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 (63%) or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test
Exclusion: FSL321Y1 and higher
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL315H1 - French Oral Communication for Professional and Academic Contexts

Hours: 36L

This course is designed for students who wish to develop their oral communication skills in French in preparation for bilingual employment, community service, and academic activities in Canada and abroad. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills for accurate oral language use in professional and academic contexts: researched oral presentations, debates, interviews, and student-led discussions. Students will learn how to adapt their speaking style and register to different audiences and situations, use appropriate vocabulary, and self-correct.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 (63%) or, upon first FRE/FSL, enrolment equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test
Exclusion: FSL321Y1 and higher. Not open to fluent and native speakers of French.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL321Y1 - French Language III

Hours: 48L/24T

The course is intended for students who have already mastered the basic competences in French language proficiency. The textbook used in this course will follow the B1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) in its active approach which puts emphasis on the student being at the centre of the learning process. Students will learn the following intermediate-level language skills: writing, speaking as well as understanding written and spoken French.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 (63%) or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment, equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test
Exclusion: FSL375Y1 and higher. May not be taken concurrently with any FSL31*H1 series courses.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL375Y1 - Practical Translation: French - English

Hours: 72L

This full-year course, which works as an introduction to translation, is designed to improve students’ mastery of French through English to French and French to English translations. Emphasis is on the practice of translation of a variety of texts and documents, and on the introduction to the practice of oral interpretation from one language to the other.

Prerequisite: 1.0 FCE in FSL at the 300-level, or any 1.0 FCE in FRE at the 200-level.
Exclusion: Any FSL 400-level course.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL415H1 - Professional Communication in French (Oral)

Hours: 36S

This course is designed to strengthen oral communication skills in French and develop intercultural competence for a variety of career paths including public relations, international development, federal and provincial government. Students will acquire expertise in spoken French through in-class activities supported by multimedia: interviews, professional presentations, and debates. The course is not open to fluent or native speakers of French.

Prerequisite: FSL321Y1, FSL315H1
Exclusion: Any FSL 400-level course. Not open to fluent or native speakers of French.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FSL472H1 - Reading and Writing Fiction and Non-Fiction in French

Hours: 36L

An online course designed for students who wish to further develop their reading and writing skills in French. Students will acquire analytic tools to comprehend, analyze and write fiction and non-fiction texts. Multimedia approach to understanding the cultural experiences of francophone world.

Prerequisite: FSL375Y1
Exclusion: FSL 421Y and higher
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL473H1 - Oral French in Context

Hours: 36L

Putting students in diverse speaking and listening situations and contexts, this course is designed for those who wish to consolidate and perfect their speaking and listening abilities and take them to the next level. Focusing on a contextual approach of both oral and aural French and various francophone cultures, this course will focus on various aspects and difficulties that come with speaking and understanding French in real-life situations.

Prerequisite: FSL375Y1
Exclusion: Not open to fluent or native speakers of French.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER100Y1 - Introduction to German

Hours: 96P

This is the language course to take if you have had no previous experience of the German language. The emphasis is on comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary and basic grammar. This course can be counted towards all programs in German.

Note: Students with any previous knowledge of German are REQUIRED to take a placement test offered at the department.

Exclusion: Senior high school German or equivalent. Note: Students with any previous knowledge of German are required to take a placement test offered at the department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER101H1 - Introduction to German b

Hours: 48P

This course is intended for students with some prior knowledge of German. It is equivalent to the Spring Term of GER100Y1. The emphasis is on comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, vocabulary and basic grammar.

Exclusion: Senior high school German or equivalent. GER100Y1.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER150H1 - Introduction to German Culture (E)

Hours: 24L/12T

This course taught in English is intended for students who are unfamiliar with German culture. It examines historical, political and cultural developments in Germany from about 1871 to the present focusing on literary and non-literary texts. (Note: This course is required for the major and specialist program; it should be taken within the first two years.)

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER200Y1 - Intermediate German 1

Hours: 96P

This course continues the work done in GER100Y1 / GER101H1. It further expands on basic grammar and vocabulary, practice in comprehension, composition, and conversation.

Prerequisite: GER100Y1/​ GER101H1 or German placement test, Senior high school German or equivalent
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER251H1 - German and European Cinema (E)

Hours: 24P/24S

This course examines German cinema against the backdrop of European film history. European films share common references points anchored in the cataclysms of two world wars, and have also negotiated analogous postwar transformations in family life, urbanization, the regional and the national, cultural identity, labour relations, post-socialist societies, and state security. A comparative approach enables examination of what binds German cinema to European cinema – shared histories and political concerns--as well as what is nationally unique and distinctive. By matching select films with readings from social theory, cultural studies, and film studies, we will compare and contrast these socio-historical concerns while also attending to the medium specificities of film style, aesthetics, and narrative form.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER260Y1 - Elementary Yiddish

Hours: 72P

This course introduces Yiddish language, literature, music, theater, and cinema through interactive multi-media seminars, designed to build proficiency in reading, writing and comprehending. No prior knowledge of Yiddish is required.

Exclusion: GER463Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER290H1 - Global Issues - German Contexts (E)

Hours: 24S

The movement of cultural products, material goods, capital, people, ideas, and information across national borders has resulted in a new quality of global interdependency. The course explores the contemporary character of globalization patterns and problems as they bear on German-speaking contexts. Readings in globalization history and theory.

Prerequisite: none
Corequisite: none
Exclusion: none
Recommended Preparation: 2.0 FCE of German language instruction in consultation with department
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GER300Y1 - Intermediate German 2

Hours: 96P

Continuing the work done in GER100Y1 and GER200Y1, this course offers German at the intermediate level focusing on extension of vocabulary, specific problems of grammar, essay-writing, reading and conversation. The Department reserves the right to place students in the appropriate course in the series GER200Y1 and GER300Y1.

Prerequisite: GER200Y1/​ GER201H1 or German placement test
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER305H1 - German Literature II

Hours: 36S

Building on the work of GER205H1, this course offers a survey of German literature and culture from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Within a chronological framework, students read and analyze excerpts from representative works of major German writers. (Note: This course is required for the major and specialist program, and should be taken concurrently with GER300Y1.)

Prerequisite: GER205H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER310H1 - Contemporary German Culture and Media

Hours: 24S

This course focuses on contemporary German culture as expressed through a variety of media. It approaches Germany and Germany's position within Europe and the world mainly (but not exclusively) through non-literary texts.

Prerequisite: GER200Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER350H1 - German Visual Cultures

Hours: 24P/24S

This course presents students with a survey of the history and development of the German cinema. It examines major trends of German cinematography focusing on thematic and formal aspects.

Prerequisite: GER205H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER360H1 - Intermediate Yiddish

Hours: 36P

The course conducted in Yiddish offers a review of basic grammar, stylistics, study of short literary texts.

Prerequisite: GER260Y1
Exclusion: GER463Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER370H1 - German Business Culture 1

Hours: 36P

This course provides students with a working knowledge of German business culture that allows them to navigate the German workplace. The main focus is to deepen students’ knowledge of business concepts.

Note: This course is required for the minor program in Business German

Prerequisite: GER200Y1, GER272H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER400H1 - Advanced German 1

Hours: 48P

This is a course for advanced learners of German reviewing complex features of the language and introducing them to aspects of German stylistics. The emphasis lies on oral and written communication.

Prerequisite: GER300Y1/​ GER301H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GER431H1 - Topics in Germanic Studies

Hours: 24S

An open course which explores specific aspects of Germanic Studies.

Prerequisite: GER305H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GGR107H1 - Environment, Food and People

Hours: 24L/12T

Examines the relations between food, nature, and society. Food is fundamental to human existence, and central to most cultures; it also has significant and widespread effects on the physical and social environments. Food is used as a lens to explore human-environment interactions locally and globally. Serves as an introduction to environmental and human geography.

Exclusion: GGR107Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR124H1 - Cities and Urban Life

Hours: 24L/6T

Offers an introduction to North American cities and urbanization in a global context. It explores social, cultural, political and economic forces, processes, and events that shape contemporary urbanism. The course adopts the lens of 'fixity' and 'flow' to examine how the movement of people, ideas, goods, and capital, as well as their containment in the infrastructure and space of the city, give rise to particular urban forms.

Exclusion: GGR124Y1; GGR207H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR201H1 - Geomorphology

Hours: 24L/8P

Introduction to the principles of geomorphology; earth materials; major features of crustal morphology; landforming processes of water, wind, waves and ice; human impact on earth surface processes. One hour laboratory session approximately every other week; a local field trip.

Exclusion: GGR201H5
Recommended Preparation: JEG100H1/​ GGR100H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR221H1 - New Economic Spaces

Hours: 24L/4T

Provides an introduction to economic geography and economic geography theory from the 1970s on, illustrating the different ways that geographers have conceptualized the restructuring of resource industries, manufacturing and services. The crisis of Fordism and the rise of new production models will be given particular attention, along with the reorganization of finance, the rise of cultural industries and the globalization of commodity chains. New regimes of governance of the economy will also be considered.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR225H1 - Power of Maps and Geographic Information

Hours: 24L/4P

This course examines the changing role of geographic information and maps in society. It considers how spatial information is produced, organized, and used in different historical, cultural, and political contexts. Topics examined include: the effects of the shift from print to digital mapping; implications of mobile spatial technologies and the geoweb; open source and open access; production and control of spatial data and information; and alternative cartographies. Introduces concepts of Geospatial Literacy, Critical Mapping and Critical GIS.

Exclusion: GGR375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR246H1 - Geography of Canada

Hours: 24L

Social and economic differences have been, and continue to be, a prominent feature of Canada’s geography. In this course these differences are examined at a regional and local scale. The course adopts a thematic approach and considers issues such as historical development, urbanization, industrialization, immigration and population change, Canada’s cultural mosaic and native issues. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of social and economic policies and Canada’s incorporation into a global economy.

Exclusion: GGR202H5
Recommended Preparation: GGR107H1, GGR124H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR252H1 - Marketing Geography

Hours: 24L/4T

Geography matters in the success of both public and private sector organisations. Using mostly retail examples contemporary location problems are addressed. The geographies of demand and supply are analysed and trade area and site selection techniques are applied. The relevance of the planning context and utility of geovisualisation techniques such as GIS are also briefly considered.

Exclusion: GGR252H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR270H1 - Introductory Analytical Methods

Hours: 24L/12T

Theory and practical application of elementary quantitative techniques in geography emphasizing descriptive, inferential and spatial statistical analysis, probability, and sampling.

Exclusion: ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ EEB225H1/​ GGR270Y1/​ LIN305H1/​ POL222H1/​ POL242Y1/​ PSY201H1/​ SOC202H1/​ STA220H1/​ STA248H1/​ STA250H1/​ STA261H1
Recommended Preparation: 0.5 FCE in Geography
Distribution Requirements: Social Science; Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR271H1 - Social Research Methods

Hours: 24L

Practical course on field methods designed to enable students to carry out their own research projects. Behavioural observation, interviewing, questionnaire design, sampling theory, content analysis of written and graphic material, data coding and focus groups.

Exclusion: SOC200H1/​ SOC204H1/​ CRI350H1/​ ENV223H1(from 2010-11)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

GGR272H1 - Geographic Information and Mapping I

Hours: 24L/24P

Introduction to digital mapping and spatial analysis using geographic information systems (GIS). Students learn how to use GIS software to find, edit, analyze and map geographic data to create their own maps, analyze geographic problems and use techniques that can be applied to a variety of subject areas.

Exclusion: GGRB30H3, GGR272H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR273H1 - Geographic Information and Mapping II

Hours: 24L/24P

Builds on GGR272H1 by providing students with practical spatial analysis methods and the underlying theory needed to understand how to approach various geographic problems using geographic information system (GIS) software and a variety of data types and sources.

Prerequisite: GGR272H1
Exclusion: GGRB32H3
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR305H1 - Biogeography

Hours: 24L

Identifies patterns in and explains processes behind plant and animal distributions through space and time. Topics covered include ecological and evolutionary dynamics, disturbance, dispersal, migration, continental drift, speciation, extinction, paleoenvironments and island biogeography. We also examine terrestrial and marine biomes, the meaning of biodiversity, conservation challenges, and recent biogeographic changes associated with human impact.

Exclusion: GGR305H5
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including JEG100H1/​ GGR100H1 or ( BIO120H1, BIO130H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

GGR314H1 - Global Warming

Hours: 30L/6T

A comprehensive examination of the greenhouse warming problem, beginning with economic, carbon cycle, and climate model projections; impacts on and adaptive responses of agriculture, forests, fisheries, and water resources; options and policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Exclusion: GGR377H5
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirements: Science; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR327H1 - Geography and Gender

Hours: 24L

Introduction to the work of feminist geographers. The course will explore the relationship between gender and space, emphasizing spatial cognition, architecture, and layout of the city.

Exclusion: GGR313H5
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR329H1 - The Global Food System

Hours: 24L

Explores the changing global geographies of food by tracing international movements of food through both mainstream and 'alternative' supply chains. The implications for sustainability, food security, community autonomy and health are investigated.

Exclusion: GGR287H5
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3). GGR107H1 recommended.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR334H1 - Water Resource Management

Hours: 24L

Managing demand and supply; linkages between water quality and human health. Case studies from the industrial world and from developing countries, rural and urban. Implications of population growth and climate change for water resource management.

Exclusion: GGR288H5
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including one of JEG100H1/​ GGR100H1, GGR107H1, GGR223H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR337H1 - Environmental Remote Sensing

Hours: 24L/24P

Principles of optical, active and passive microwave remote sensing; satellite orbit and sensor characteristics; image processing and analysis techniques and software; and environmental remote sensing applications.

Exclusion: GGR337H5
Recommended Preparation: JEG100H1/​ GGR100H1, GGR272H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR339H1 - Urban Geography, Planning and Political Processes

Hours: 24L

Investigates North American urban political geography, exploring conflicts over immigration, environment, gentrification, homelessness, labour market restructuring, ‘race’ and racism, urban sprawl, nature and environment, gender, sexuality, security, and segregation. Explores competing visions of city life and claims on urban space. The course investigates how these struggles connect to economic, social and environmental politics at larger spatial scales, and considers different theoretical frameworks that geographers have developed to make sense of both the persistence of old problems and the emergence of new ones. Field trip cost: $20.

Exclusion: GGR349H5
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR124H1, GGR246H1/​ GGR254H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR340H1 - Health Geography

Hours: 24L

An exploration of the aspects of health in which place or location matters. Particular attention will be paid to the role of environments (physical, social, etc.) in explaining differences in health between places, the structuring of health-related behaviour in place, and the development of health policy for places.

Prerequisite: 2 of GGR270H1, GGR271H1 or GGR272H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including one of GGR222H1/​ GGR223H1 or ENV236H1/​ JGE236H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR349H1 - Managing Urban Natures

Hours: 24L

Recent calls to action by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the World Wildlife Fund indicate we are at a crossroads in responding to accelerating global warming and biodiversity loss. Cities are often at the forefront of these transformations, both in feeling their effects but also initiating responses. How might we reimagine our cities in a way that promotes thriving and equitable ecosystems? What tools exist in the policy landscape to initiate needed changes? What innovative responses are emerging to confront the challenges of increased flooding, rising temperatures, habitat fragmentation, and food insecurity? How might we reimagine an urban commons? With a primary focus on Canadian cities, in this course we explore the ways divergent conceptualizations of urban-nature have informed policies and practices drawing largely from critical, political ecology, and Indigenous perspectives; the policy landscape that informs current urban planning; and new and innovative approaches that help us to reshape and reimagine our relationships to urban nature, including initiatives led by municipalities, non-government organizations and citizens groups.

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCEs
Exclusion: GGR300H1 (Topics: Managing Urban Natures), offered in Fall 2017
Recommended Preparation: GGR223H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR357H1 - Housing and Community Development

Hours: 24L

Focuses on the importance of adequate housing and quality neighbourhoods. It roots theoretical explanations and policy debates in realities using Canada and Toronto as examples. Topics covered include the evolution of public policies relating to social housing, rental housing, homeownership, neighborhoods, and homelessness.

Recommended Preparation: Completion of 8.0 FCE's including GGR124H1 and 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR382H1 - Field Course in Human Geography

Introduction to field studies in human geography. The course includes exercises and a project during a one-week field study in late August or early September, some preparation during the preceding summer and complementary practical work and/or seminars during the Fall Term. Each student is required to pay the costs of their transportation and accommodation (field trip costs: $500). Students must register with the department in the spring. Course is limited by size. Preference given to Geography SPE/MAJ/MIN. Applications open to all students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
Exclusion: GGR389H5
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR386H1 - Special Topics in Geographic Information Systems

Previous Course Number: GGR300H1
Hours: 24L

Content in any given year varies by instructor. Students must meet the prerequisites set by the department (see the Geography website for details in May). Can be used towards GIS, Human Geography, and Environmental Geography programs.

Prerequisite: GGR272H1

GGR390H1 - Field Methods

Introduction to field methods in geomorphology, vegetation mapping/analysis, soils, hydrology, and climatology. The course includes exercises and a group project during a one-week field camp, a little preparation during the preceding summer, and complementary practical work and/or seminars during the Fall Term. Each student is required to pay the costs of their transportation and accommodation (field trip costs: $300). This course meets the field requirement for Physical & Environmental Geography programs. The field camp normally runs for one week at the end of August. Students must register with the Department by April. Consult with the department in case of conflict or concerns. Course may be limited by size. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 1.0 from JEG100H1/​ GGR100H1, GGR201H1, GGR203H1, GGR205H1, GGR206H1, GGR305H1, ESS102H1, ENV234H1, or permission of the instructor
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR270H1
Distribution Requirements: Science

GGR416H1 - Environmental Impact Assessment

Hours: 24L/4T

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) as a mechanism for avoiding or mediating the potential costs of development. The course focuses on the theory and practice of EIA in Canada in general and Ontario in particular. Using a broad definition of environment, various components of EIA are addressed, with an emphasis on principles, legal and institutional frameworks, stages in the process, and specific analytical techniques.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's, 2.0 FCE's in Geography including GGR270H1, GGR271H1
Recommended Preparation: One of GGR222H1/​ GGR223H1 or ENV236H1/​ JGE236H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR424H1 - Transportation Geography and Planning

Previous Course Number: GGR324H1
Hours: 24L

Introductory overview of major issues in interurban and intraurban transportation at the local, national and international scale. Topics include urban transportation, land use patterns and the environment, causes of and cures for congestion, public transit, infrastructure finance, and transport planning and policy setting.

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's including one of GGR124H1/​ GGR220H1/​ GGR221H1
Exclusion: GGR324H1, CITC18H3
Recommended Preparation: GGR270H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS262H1 - Canada: A Short History of Here

Hours: 24L/10T

Designed for non-history students, this introductory survey fulfills the Society and Its Institutions breadth requirement.  It is open to all who want to know more about Canada.  Make sense of politics today and develop a deeper understanding of Canadian society and its institutions through study of the major events and demographic trends that have shaped the development of this country.  Topics will include First Nations/newcomer relations (including treaties and the Truth & Reconciliation report), French/English relations (including Quebec separatism), regionalism, the North, economic history, constitutional developments, and the development of Canadian identity, including common symbols associated with Canada.  No essay requirement.  Instead, enhance your critical reading and thinking skills through short writing assignments and weekly discussions of tutorial readings.

*This course will not count towards History program requirements or as a prerequisite for upper level courses*

Exclusion: HIS263Y1, HIS264H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS264H1 - Critical Issues in Canadian History

Hours: 24L/12T

This course introduces key issues in Canadian history and foundational principles of historical analysis. It is primarily designed for potential History majors/specialists. It is not a comprehensive survey. Examples serve to deepen analysis and introduce important methods and debates, preparing students for upper year courses in Canadian history.

Exclusion: HIS262H1, HIS263Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS318H1 - The "Wild" West in Canada

Hours: 24L/7T

What happens when histories of Canada begin in the West? This course examines the critical challenges that the myths and legacies of the West pose to Canadian history, from pre-contract to 1990. Themes include First Nations and colonialism, immigration, racism, economic development, regionalism, prostitution and illegal economies.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS330H1 - Germany from Frederick the Great to the First World War

Hours: 24L

Topics include German reactions to the French Revolution, Napoleonic occupation, the Wars of Liberation, industrial expansion, the Revolutions of 1848, unification in 1871, Bismarck and Kaiser Wilhelm II, everyday life, gender relations, avant-garde culture, nationalism, antisemitism, colonialism, and the Great War of 1914-18.

Prerequisite: At least 1.0 FCE HIS course(s) at the 100 or 200 level
Exclusion: HIS341Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS339H1 - History of Modern Israel

Hours: 24L

This course explores the history of the Jewish state from the rise of Zionism to the present. Topics include the Zionist-Arab conflict, immigration, the construction of a new Hebrew identity, interactions between religion and state, the impact of the Holocaust, and the relationship between Israel and the Jewish diaspora. 

Prerequisite: HIS208Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS360H1 - Critical Histories of the Black Canadian Experience

Previous Course Number: HIS360Y1
Hours: 24L

This course explores the long history and diverse experiences of African Canadians in Canada. Topics may include slavery, the underground railroad, migration, and Black life in rural and urban Canada throughout the 20th century. Discussions will be situated in broad and transnational debates about race.

Exclusion: HIS360Y1
Recommended Preparation: Any 100 or 200 level HIS course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS379H1 - Vietnam at War

Hours: 24L

This course examines war in modern Vietnam, beginning with Vietnamese nationalism in the 19th century to the conflicts with France, the United States, and China. We will consider the military, political, economic, and cultural contexts of these complex and interconnected wars, especially from the viewpoint of the Vietnamese people.

Prerequisite: 1.0 FCE of prior course in History, any field
Exclusion: HIS400H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS393H1 - Digital History

Hours: 24L

Explores implications for history and its methods of the shift from print to digital sources. Imparts introductory skills in the manipulation digital media, such as the use of maps, GIS and big data.

Prerequisite: 200-level History course or one of WDW235H1/​ WDW236H1
Exclusion: HIS389H1 (Topics in History: Digital History), offered in Summer 2015, Winter 2016, and Winter 2017
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

HIS396H1 - The Progressive Era and Rise of Big Business in America

Hours: 24L

This course examines the rise of big business in America and its relationship to social and economic changes in United States in the so-called Progressive Era (roughly 1880-1920). We will focus on several themes: the evolution and characteristics of big business; rise of organized labor; evolution of business-government relations; social and economic reform movements; and the changing status of immigrants, African Americans, and women (both white and African-American). In short, we will be studying a pivotal moment in the transformation of modern American society.

Exclusion: HIS389H1 (Topics in History: Business and Society), offered in Fall 2016
Recommended Preparation: One 100 level humanities or business course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS407H1 - Imperial Germany, 1871-1918

Hours: 24S

Historiographical controversies and the latest empirical findings concerning social conflict and political mobilization under Bismarck and Wilhelm II. Problems raised by competing schools of interpretation include definitions of the authoritarian state, bourgeois hegemony, localism and regionalism, radical nationalism, workers 'culture, and gender relations. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS330H1 or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: HIS407H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS423H1 - Social History of Medicine in the 19th& 20th Centuries

Hours: 24S

Introduces students to current issues in the social history of medicine and some of the major developments in the modern history of the discipline. The format is class discussion based on themes covered in the course textbook, covering such topics as the history of the doctor-patient relationship, changes in physicians' social status, changing attitudes toward the body, and the evolution of various medical and surgical specialites including obstetrics and gynecology. (Joint undergraduate-graduate).

Exclusion: HIS423Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS437H1 - Telling Lies About Hitler: Frauds and Famous Feuds Among German Historians

Hours: 24S

Examines historiographical controversies and their public reception. Topics include the forged Hitler diaries, the David Irving trial, German responsibility for 1914, Daniel Goldhagen’s “eliminationist” thesis, Auschwitz as an “Asiatic deed,” Wehrmacht complicity in the Holocaust and retrospective films about East Germany.

Prerequisite: HIS317H1/​ HIS330H1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS473H1 - The United States and Asia since 1945

Previous Course Number: HIS473Y1
Hours: 24S

This seminar examines strategic, economic, ideological, and cultural factors in U.S. relations with East and Southeast Asia. Major themes include the role of cultural and informal diplomacy and the effect of perceptions and misperceptions on both sides of U.S. - Asian interactions.

Prerequisite: 1.0 FCE of prior course in History, any field
Exclusion: HIS473Y1
Recommended Preparation: HIS271Y1/​ HIS280Y1/​ HIS328H1/​ HIS344H1/​ HIS376H1/​ HIS377H1/​ HIS379H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS489H1 - The History of Psychiatry and Psychiatric Illness

Hours: 24S

Introduces students to current issues in the history of psychiatry and some of the major developments in the evolution of this unique medical specialty. the format is class discussion based on themes covered in the course textbook, covering such topics as changing perspectives on the nature of psychotic illness, the psychoneuroses, disorders of the mind/body relationship, psychiatric diagnosis, and presentations of illness. (Joint undergraduate-graduate).

Exclusion: HIS423Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HMB202H1 - Introduction to Health and Disease

Hours: 24L/12P

An introductory course in Health and Disease using an interdisciplinary approach that integrates bacteriology and virology with other aspects of human biology, including chronic disease and neoplasia. An exploration of the key concepts and approaches that are necessary for understanding the dynamic nexus of human health and disease. (Lab Fees: $40)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Exclusion: HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB302H1 - Vertebrate Histology and Histopathology

Hours: 24L/36P

Laboratory and lecture course studying the structure of the cell, various tissues and organ systems. Emphasis is on functional morphology and the adaptive response (including the inflammatory reaction) by comparing histological sections of normal tissues and organs with common diseases including neoplasia, respiratory, and liver disease. (Lab Materials Fee: $27)

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB310H1 - Laboratory in Neuroscience

Hours: 12L/36P

A laboratory course based on current research techniques for students in the Neuroscience program. Lab topics may include human brain imaging and disorders, electrophysiology, cell culture, and changes in gene expression during neuronal development. Labs start in the first week of term. (Lab Materials Fee: $60)

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB200H1/​ PSY290H1, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Corequisite: PSL300H1
Exclusion: HMB311H1/​ HMB312H1/​ HMB314H1/​ PSY359H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB311H1 - Laboratory in Fundamental Genetics and its Applications

Hours: 12L/36P

A laboratory course based on current research techniques for students in the Fundamental Genetics and its Applications programs. Lab topics may include molecular biology and animal cell culture techniques, nutrigenomics; an overview of microarrays and a CRISPR module. Labs start in the first week of term. (Lab Materials Fee: $100)

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB201H1, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Exclusion: HMB310H1/​ HMB312H1/​ HMB314H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB312H1 - Laboratory in Health and Disease

Hours: 12L/36P

A laboratory course based on current research techniques and topics which may include basic microbiology, molecular biology and animal cell culture techniques, immunocytochemistry, changes in gene expression, and histological techniques. Labs start in the first week of term. (Lab Materials Fee: $70)

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Corequisite: BCH210H1
Exclusion: HMB310H1/​ HMB311H1/​ HMB314H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB314H1 - Laboratory in Human Biology

Hours: 12L/36P

Students analyze whole body, cellular, and molecular responses to stress. Techniques range from those standard in medical practice (e.g., fitness measures, blood pressure, lung function) to current research techniques (cell culture, changes in gene expression). Students gain technical and analytical skills as they work at the bench to design and carry out individual and group experiments. Labs start in the first week of term. (Lab Materials Fee: $52)

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Corequisite: PSL300H1, PSL301H1
Exclusion: HMB310H1/​ HMB311H1/​ HMB312H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB489H1 - Advanced Laboratory in Human Biology

Hours: 72P

Building on their experience in 3rd-year labs, students participate in inquiry-based laboratory experiments in diverse areas of current human biology research. Open to students in any Human Biology program. Labs start in the first week of term. (Lab Materials Fee: $105)

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB310H1/​ HMB311H1/​ HMB312H1/​ HMB314H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HPS211H1 - Scientific Revolutions II

Hours: 24L

Case studies in the history of science from 1800 to 2000, including Volta, Lyell, Darwin, Mendel, Einstein, Schrdinger, Watson, and Crick. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike

Exclusion: HPS200Y1, HPS300Y0
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS222H1 - Science, Paradoxes, and Knowledge

Hours: 24L/10T

What is the nature of science and scientific knowledge? What is the nature of space, time and motion? Does science tell us the truth about the world? What are scientific revolutions and how they occur? The course will address these and various other questions about science. It will focus on the bearings that philosophical views had on science in different periods in history, starting from ancient Greece and concluding in the 20th C.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HPS391H1 - The Story of Number: Mathematics from the Babylonians to the Scientific Revolution

Hours: 24L/10T

A survey of the development of mathematics from 1700 to the present with emphasis on historical issues. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: At least one full course equivalent at the 200+level from CSC/MAT/STA
Exclusion: HPS310Y1; MAT220Y1, MAT391H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HPS498H1 - Individual Studies in HPS

A reading and research project in some aspect of the development of scientific theory or practice, supervised by a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Two HPS courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

HST373H1 - Epidemiology

Previous Course Number: UNI373H1
Hours: 36L

Introduces students to the principles and methods of epidemiology. Emphasis on descriptive methods and study design. Computational techniques, measurement problems, and issues that surround the drawing of inferences from area-level or other aggregate data will be discussed.

Prerequisite: STA220H1 or equivalent
Exclusion: HMB342H1, UNI373H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

HST450Y1 - Undergraduate Health Research Project

Previous Course Number: UNI450Y1

Final culminating project for students in the Health Studies Specialist. Students will prepare an undergraduate thesis by the end of the course under the supervision of a University of Toronto faculty member. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: HST250H1, STA220H1, HST350Y1
Exclusion: UNI450Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

HST451Y1 - Independent Research in Health Studies

Previous Course Number: UNI451Y1

This two-semester course designation will permit students to gain academic credit for health studies pursued independently, or to participate in an ongoing health research project, under the supervision of a University of Toronto faculty member. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: HST209H1, HST250H1
Exclusion: UNI451Y1
Recommended Preparation: HST350Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

IMC200H1 - Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Hours: 24L

How do innovations become useful in society? What is needed for a company to use such innovations successfully? Why and how do individuals and companies commercialize a technology? This course gives an introduction to the skills needed by entrepreneurs in order to start a new venture based on an innovative idea. This course is Pass/Fail. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 4.0 FCEs in any subject
Exclusion: RSM100H1
Recommended Preparation: No particular preparation needed. Although the topics relate to science innovations, the course is targeted at students from all disciplines, who are interested in using innovations. This includes science, social sciences and humanities students, mirroring the roles of these individuals in enterprises. Because this is an introductory course, students who have previously taken business or entrepreneurial courses are strongly discouraged from registering in this course.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

IMC391H1 - Exploring New Ventures

Hours: 12L/48P

This experiential learning course allows students to explore the inner working of new venture companies. The majority of the course consists of a placement with Toronto-based start-ups, with oversight from the Impact Centre. In-class activities facilitate the application of entrepreneurial tools to develop the students’ entrepreneurial skills.

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCEs in any subject.
Corequisite: IMC200H1/​ RSM100H1/​ MGT100H1
Exclusion: IMC390Y1, IMC392Y1
Recommended Preparation: Although the internships often relate to science innovations, they are targeted at students from all disciplines. This includes science and engineering, social sciences and humanities students, mirroring the roles of these individuals in enterprises.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

IMC392Y1 - Exploring New Ventures

Hours: 12L/96P

This experiential learning course allows students to explore the inner working of new venture companies. The majority of the course consists of a placement with Toronto-based stat-ups, with oversight from the Impact Centre. In-class activities facilitate the application of entrepreneurial tools to develop the students' entrepreneurial skills.

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCEs in any subject.
Corequisite: IMC200H1/​ RSM100H1/​ MGT100H1
Exclusion: IMC390Y1, IMC391H1
Recommended Preparation: Although the internships often relate to science innovations, they are targeted at students from all disciplines. This includes science and engineering, social sciences and humanities students, mirroring the roles of these individuals in enterprises.
Distribution Requirements: Science; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

IMM340H1 - Fundamental Immunology

Hours: 24L/12T

This course introduces the basic principles and key players of the immune system: differences and interplay between innate and adaptive immunity, how immune cells develop and function, how immune cells recognize threats and danger and mount an appropriate and measured response. This course is offered in the Fall term with in-class lectures and tutorials, as well as in the Summer term with hybrid delivery (online lectures and in-class tutorials).

Prerequisite: BIO230H1
Exclusion: IMM334Y1/​ IMM335Y1/​ IMM341H1
Recommended Preparation: IMM250H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

INI103H1 - Writing Essays

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduces the fundamentals of essay writing within an interdisciplinary context. Includes the history of the essay and its various rhetorical modes (narrative, descriptive, expository, argumentative), with a focus on humanities and social sciences essays. Both non-academic essays and essays from across the academic disciplines are examined in terms of purpose, audience, and persuasive strategies.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

INI304H1 - The Illusion and Reality of Evidence

Hours: 24L

This seminar in critical reading, analysis, and writing focuses on the nature, the evaluation, and the use and abuse of evidence in the process of formulating and supporting an argument. The case study method will be employed to assess the level of authority, credibility, and objectivity evident in public discourse, official sources, and academic inquiry.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents, and a writing course offered by the Writing and Rhetoric Program (or equivalent).
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA233H1 - Italian-Canadian Literature

Hours: 24L

The course will explore how notions of identity and (self)-representation emerge in literature by Canadian writers of Italian descent, illustrating the critical evolution of the immigrant journey from its historical experience to its current condition. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience. (Given in English)

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ITA250Y1 - Intermediate Italian

Hours: 72S

Grammar review, readings of Italian authors and oral practice to enhance comprehension and expressive skills.

Prerequisite: ITA100Y1/​ ITA151Y1; Grade 11 and/or 12 Italian (U or M level), or previous experience or instruction in Italian, or permission of the Department.
Exclusion: ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA300H1 - History of Italian Literature: Middle Ages and Renaissance

Hours: 24L

This course provides a chronological, comprehensive view of Italian literature and its major authors and trends, in their socio-historical contexts from its beginnings to the Renaissance. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Exclusion: ITA200H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA301H1 - History of Italian Literature: Baroque to Contemporary

Hours: 24L

This course provides a chronological, comprehensive view of Italian literature and its major authors and trends, in their socio-historical contexts from the Baroque period to the present day. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Exclusion: ITA201H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA311H1 - Mediaeval Italian Literature in Translation: Dante

Hours: 24L

A study of the Vita Nuova and of the Divine Comedy within the literary and cultural contexts of the Middle Ages. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Given in English)

Exclusion: ITA320H1/​ ITA321H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA312H1 - Mediaeval Italian Literature in Translation: Petrarch and Boccaccio

Hours: 24L

A study of Petrarch's Canzoniere and of Boccaccio's Decameron in relation to later Middle Ages. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Given in English)

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA320H1 - Dante: Vita Nuova and Divina Commedia (Inferno)

Hours: 24L

Dante's poetry and great Christian epic of conversion explode with the passions of this world. This course focuses on intertextual and rhetorical strategies used to fashion the author's complex vision of contemporary society within the framework of providential history. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Exclusion: ITA311H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA321H1 - Dante: Divina Commedia (Purgatorio and Paradiso)

Hours: 24L

A continuation of ITA320H1, this course examines the Purgatorio and the Paradiso in the context of Dante's vision of contemporary society. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA320H1
Exclusion: ITA311H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA330H1 - Alessandro Manzoni and the 19th Century

Hours: 24L

Italy’s foremost author’s conscious attempt to write the great representative (“epic”) work of the Risorgimento. This course explores Manzoni's continuing struggle to find the appropriate language, style, and genre to express his vision of history. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA340H1 - Italian Neorealist Cinema

Hours: 24L/36P

The focus of this course is the films of Italian Neorealism, one of the most influential, artistic, and intellectual movements in the history of world cinema. While emphasis will be placed primarily on the work of Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio De Sica, and Luchino Visconti, the course will also offer a detailed discussion of the historical context and of the sociopolitical issues of postwar Italy. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Given in English)

Recommended Preparation: ITA240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA341H1 - Gender and Genre in Italian Cinema

Hours: 24L/36P

The course looks at Italian cinema from the perspective of gender and genre studies. While the focus will be primarily on film, the course will also engage with different media and discuss how these have informed and influenced Italian notions of masculinity and femininity throughout the Twentieth Century. The emphasis on genre will provide the structure to organize a discourse that will embrace very diverse and multifaceted texts, and will enable students to develop their analytical and critical skills in the field. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience. (Given in English)

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA350Y1 - Language Practice

Hours: 24P/48S

For students who have completed ITA250Y1/ ITA251Y1. Discussion of problems of grammar, style, and composition. Language analysis based on readings of Italian authors. One hour a week of oral practice. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Exclusion: ITA351Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA356Y0 - Italian Culture from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance

Hours: 24L/24T

A survey of artists, writers, and thinkers from the time of Dante to the days of Leonardo. During field trips, the streets, squares, churches, and palazzi of many cities serve as living laboratories for a discussion of the topography of mediaeval and Renaissance cities. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience. (Offered in Siena only.)

ITA356Y0: This course is taught in English and is open to students from other disciplines.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

ITA357Y0 - Italian Culture from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance

Hours: 24L/24T

A survey of artists, writers, and thinkers from the time of Dante to the days of Leonardo. During field trips, the streets, squares, churches, and palazzi of many cities serve as living laboratories for a discussion of the topography of mediaeval and Renaissance cities. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Offered in Siena only.)

ITA357Y0: Students who wish to petition the Department for credit towards a Specialist or Major in Italian will be required to do the readings in Italian.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

ITA358Y0 - Modern Italian Culture

Hours: 24L/24T

Analysis of a selection of philosophical, artistic, musical, and literary works from the age of the Baroque to the present. The main topics of discussion include: Romanticism, Italian unification, theatre, opera, Futurism, fascism, Neorealism, regional differences, and industrialization. Field trips and viewing of movies included. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Offered in Siena only)

ITA358Y0: This course is taught in English and is open to students from other disciplines.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

ITA359Y0 - Modern Italian Culture

Hours: 24L/24T

Analysis of a selection of philosophical, artistic, musical, and literary works from the age of the Baroque to the present. The main topics of discussion include: Romanticism, Italian unification, theatre, opera, Futurism, fascism, Neorealism, regional differences, and industrialization. Field trips and viewing of movies included. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Offered in Siena only)

ITA359Y0: Students who wish to petition the Department for credit towards a Specialist or Major in Italian will be required to do the readings in Italian.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

ITA360H1 - Italian Linguistics

Hours: 24L

For students having a knowledge of Italian and/or Italian dialects but no background in linguistics. Concepts of general linguistics. Italy as a linguistic entity. The structure of contemporary Italian, with special regard to its sound system and grammatical categories. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Given in English)

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA363H1 - Italian Sociolinguistics

Hours: 24L

Starting with a survey of the sociolinguistic situation in Italy before Unification, this course deals with the complex relationship between regional languages and dialects on the one hand and Common Italian on the other. The recent rise of regional variants of Italian and its impact on the dialects are also discussed. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA364H1 - Italian and Social Media

Hours: 24L

The aim of this course is to examine how media can influence the evolution of language in contemporary Italy. The first part of this course has an historical goal and will be devoted to the role played by ‘traditional’ media (television, radio, newspapers) in the linguistic history of Italian. The second part will be devoted to the impact that social media is having on Italian. Empirical quantitative research will be based on the most important databases for contemporary Italian.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA367H1 - Topics in Italian Linguistics

Hours: 2L/0T/0P/0S

An open course that explores specific aspects of Italian Linguistics. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience. (Given in English)

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA370H1 - Power and Success in the Renaissance

Hours: 24L

Concepts of power and strategies for success in Renaissance texts including Machiavelli's Il principe, Castiglione's Il libro del cortegiano and Della Casa's Galateo. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA410H1 - Masterpieces of Modern Drama

Hours: 24L

This course will study works by the major Italian playwrights of the Twentieth Century, including two of Italy’s Literature Nobel Prize winners, Luigi Pirandello and Dario Fo. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between individual works and broader literary and cultural movements, as well as to issues regarding staging and production of the plays under discussion. The course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1, and at least 0.5 FCE ITA literature courses at the 300-level
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA420H1 - Spinning a Tale: The Italian Short Story from Boccaccio to Basile

Hours: 24L

The short story genre and its development from the Middle Ages to the Baroque. In addition to Boccaccio's tales, included are some of the most famous stories of Western literature, which later inspired masterpieces in all art forms, such as Romeo and Juliet, Othello and Puss in Boots. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1, and at least 0.5 FCE ITA literature courses at the 300-level
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA421H1 - Spinning a Tale: The Italian Short Story after 1800

Hours: 24L

Focusing on short stories by some of the most important authors of the Twentieth Century, such as Pirandello and Calvino, this course will provide an introduction to the major tendencies of contemporary Italian literature. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1, and at least 0.5 FCE ITA literature courses at the 300-level
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA426H1 - Special Topics in Italian Studies

Hours: 24L/0T/0P/0S

A course on specific topics in Italian Studies, designed for advanced students. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA427H1 - Special Topics in Italian Linguistics

Hours: 24L/0T/0P/0S

A course on specific topics in Italian Linguistics, designed for advanced students. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA431H1 - History of Italian Language I-from Middle ages to Cinquecento

Hours: 24L

An historical overview of the Italian language from the first Medieval documents to the texts of the Questione della Lingua. It deals with historical grammar and the analyses of early Italian texts. An introduction to notions of linguistic statistics. Empirical quantitative methods are based on the three most important databases of old Italian: TLIO,OVI,BIZ. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Exclusion: ITA430H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA432H1 - History of Italian Language II- from Cinquecento to Contemporary

Hours: 24L

The evolution of the Italian Language from the Questione della lingua to Contemporary issues pertaining to reading of literary and non literary documents and analyses of the social, political and economic conditions which influenced Early Modern, Modern and Contemporary Italian. Introduction to techniques pertaining to notions of linguistic statistics. Quantitative methods will be based on the three most important databases for the Early modern,Modern and Contemporary Italian: Vocabolario della Crusca (online),BaDIP and BIZ. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA433H1 - Italian Language and Italian Dialects in Toronto

Hours: 24L

Through an historical overview of Italian immigration in Toronto, the role of Italian and Italian dialects in the city will be examined. As part of the topic studied in course, students will contribute to the website of the OIM by collecting varied forms of empirical linguistic evidence.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ITA445H1 - Literature of the Italian Diasporas

Hours: 24L

This course examines works by writers of Italian descent, focusing on themes linked to the second-generation experience, such as intergenerational conflict, gender relations, the return journey, and the quest for identity. The comparative approach of this investigation will bring within the same framework the diasporic literatures of Canada, the United States, Argentina, Brazil, Australia, and of other countries. (Texts available in English and in their original language). This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience. (Given in English)

Recommended Preparation: ITA233H1/​ ITA345H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ITA455H1 - Women Writers in Italy

Hours: 24L

The course will focus on the writings of women in different periods of Italian history. Spanning a variety of genres, from the novel to autobiography, from poetry to essayism, the course will discuss various aspects of the debate regarding the changing roles of women in society. This course includes a component designed to enhance students' research experience.

Prerequisite: ITA250Y1/​ ITA251Y1, and at least 0.5 FCE ITA literature courses at the 300-level
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

IVP210H1 - Holography for 3D Visualization

Hours: 24L/36P

An introduction to the theory and practice of holography. Human perception & 3D visualization; fundamentals of 3D modeling; ray and wave optics; interference, diffraction, coherence; transmission and reflection holograms; colour perception; stereograms. Applications of holography in art, medicine, and technology. Computer simulation, design, and construction of holograms.

Exclusion: JOP210H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

JDC400Y1 - Redefining Security through Art

Hours: 48L/48T

Articulates a cultural approach to achieving Human Security. This course examines human security issues in which there is a significant cultural dimension to a security threat, and in which culture occupies an essential place in any realistic and effective solution. The work of artists to be analyzed include: Ariane Mnouchkine; Robert Lepage; Bertolt Brecht; John Greyson, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Terry George and Daniel Barenboim.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE; Specialist or Major in Drama and permission of the Centre.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JDC410H1 - Arts and Politics: Bertolt Brecht, Robert Lepage, Robert Wilson

Hours: 36L

Bertolt Brecht played a specific role in the paradigm shift of the art which began at the end of the 19th century. He advanced this change by trying to connect art to its social and political functions and structure with the positive acceptance of the industrial revolution and by trying to transform it with the help of the new technological media.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE; Specialist or Major in Drama and permission of the Centre.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JEG100H1 - Introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Science

Hours: 24L/12P

This introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Sciences examines the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and biosphere, emphasizing processes, flows of energy and materials, and the interconnectedness of these Earth systems. Specific topics include weather and climate, earth materials, geological and geomorphic processes involved in the genesis of landforms, river systems, glaciers, soils, and biomes. Six laboratory meetings during the term.

Exclusion: GGR100H1, ESS102H1, ESS262H1, EESA06H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

JGE331H1 - Resource and Environmental Theory

Hours: 24L

Introduction to and critical evaluation of major ideas and conceptual traditions underpinning environmental and natural resource politics and regulation. Topics include: parks and protected areas, market-based environmental regulation, property rights and conservation, Malthusianism, and biodiversity conservation. Emphasis is placed on critical reading of primary texts.

Prerequisite: GGR100H1/​ JEG100H1/​ GGR107H1/​ ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1/​ GGR222H1/​ GGR223H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JGI346H1 - The Urban Planning Process

Hours: 24L

Overview of how planning tools and practice shape the built form of cities. This course introduces twentieth century physical planning within its historical, social, legal, and political contexts. Community and urban design issues are addressed at local and regional scales and in both central cities and suburbs. The focus is on Toronto and the Canadian experience, with comparative examples from other countries, primarily the United States. Transportation costs: $20.

Exclusion: GGR361H5
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including GGR124H1, INI235H1, INI236H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JGJ360H1 - Holocaust in Literature (E)

Hours: 24S

This course examines literary works written in different languages, in ghettos and concentration camps during the Holocaust, as well as those reflecting on the genocide in its aftermath. We focus on literature as a means of engaging with the unimaginable and on the cross analysis of eye-witness and memory writing.

Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 4.0 FCEs
Exclusion: CJS220H1, GER367H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JIA400H1 - Interdisciplinary Practice for the Arts: The Architecture of Creativity

Hours: 144P

While examining the interconnectedness of the arts, students are required to meet between sessions and develop projects connected to their study. These projects involve a range of media, including theatre, film, music and visual art (installation).

Prerequisite: 14 FCE and permission of the Centre
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JNR301H1 - The History of Buddhist Meditation

Hours: 36L

This course will survey historical, cultural, and textual contexts for Buddhist meditative and contemplative practices and techniques.

Prerequisite: RLG206H1/​ NEW232Y1/​ NEW232H1
Corequisite: None
Exclusion: None
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

JPS315H1 - Sexual Diversity Politics

Hours: 24L

This is an interdisciplinary course examining the development of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) movement and its interaction with the state in the US and Canada. (Given by the Department of Political Science and the Sexual Diversity Studies Program)

Prerequisite: SDS255H1/​ SDS256H1/​ UNI255H1/​ UNI256H1/​one full course on the politics of 20th century Europe, U.S., or Canada/one full course on gender or sexuality/permission of the instructor
Exclusion: JPU315H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

LMP405Y1 - Project in Pathobiology

Hours: 154P

A self-contained research project to be completed under the supervision of a faculty member. The main areas of research are as listed in the description of the Department (above). The student will normally have completed three full years of study, and is expected to devote at least one full day per week to the project. Admission is by arrangement with the Department and with a particular supervisor. A list of potential supervisors is available from the Departmental Office and on our web site. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1, LMP300Y1/​( LMP340H1, LMP350H1)/ LMP363H1/​ LMP365H1, and permission of department
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

LMP408H1 - Genetic Modelling of Human Development and Disease

Hours: 24L

Introduces use of genetic model systems and organisms in exploring aspects of human reproduction, development, and disease. A major focus is on the impact of the genetic models on understanding human health, and disease. Ethical issues in animal research, genetic manipulation, and disease modeling are highlighted.

Prerequisite: LMP300Y1/​( LMP340H1, LMP350H1)/ BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

LMP415H1 - Forensic Pathobiology

Hours: 24L

A thematic review of the major scientific areas and research controversies in forensic medicine. The approach is mechanistic analysis and evidence-based medicine. Classical forensic medicine is critically analyzed with emphasis on experimental methods to resolve controversies. We also explore how the justice system utilizes medical and scientific data.

Prerequisite: LMP300Y1/​( LMP340H1, LMP350H1)/permission of department
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MAT138H1 - Introduction to Proofs

Hours: 36L/12T

The goal of this course is for students to become comfortable with abstraction, rigour, logic, and proofs. They will practice reading and understanding mathematical statements, analyzing definitions and properties, formulating conjectures and generalizations, providing and writing reasonable and precise arguments, writing and critiquing proofs. The instructor may use specific mathematical content, which could vary from year to year, to practice these skills. The course is aimed at students interested in the creative character of mathematics, particularly those planning to take any of our proof-oriented courses, and is an excellent preparation for MAT137Y1, MAT157Y1, or MAT240H1.

Note: students may take this course concurrently with MAT157Y1 or MAT137Y1, or prior to registering in MAT157Y1 or MAT137Y1. This course can also be used by students who have already taken MAT136H1 and wish to bridge the gap to MAT237Y1.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MAT157Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT157Y1 - Analysis I

Hours: 72L/48T

A theoretical course in calculus; emphasizing proofs and techniques, as well as geometric and physical understanding. Trigonometric identities. Limits and continuity; least upper bounds, intermediate and extreme value theorems. Derivatives, mean value and inverse function theorems. Integrals; fundamental theorem; elementary transcendental functions. Techniques of integration. Taylor's theorem; sequences and series; uniform convergence and power series.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MAT137Y1, MATA37H3, MAT137Y5, MAT157Y5, MAT195H1, & MAT197H1
Recommended Preparation: Students should consider taking the Preparing for University Math Level II in order to prepare in advance for MAT157Y1. Students may also take MAT138H1 concurrently with MAT157Y1. Students will receive credit for both MAT157Y1 and MAT138H1 if MAT138H1 is taken before or along with MAT157Y1.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT221H1 - Applied Linear Algebra

Hours: 36L/12T

An application-oriented approach to linear algebra, based on calculations in standard Euclidean space. Systems of linear equations, matrices, Gauss-Jordan elimination, subspaces, bases, orthogonal vectors and projections. Matrix inverses, kernel and range, rank-nullity theorem. Determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, Cramer's rule, diagonalization. This course has strong emphasis on building computational skills in the area of algebra. Applications to curve fitting, economics, Markov chains and cryptography.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MAT223H1, MATA23H3, MAT223H5, MAT224H1, MAT240H1, MAT240H5, MAT247H1, MAT247H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT223H1 - Linear Algebra I

Hours: 36L/12T

Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, real vector spaces, subspaces, span, linear dependence and independence, bases, rank, inner products, orthogonality, orthogonal complements, Gram-Schmidt, linear transformations, determinants, Cramer's rule, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, eigenspaces, diagonalization.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MATA23H3, MAT223H5, MAT224H1, MAT240H1, MAT240H5, MAT247H1, MAT247H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT235Y1 - Calculus II

Hours: 72L

Parametric equations and polar coordinates. Vectors, vector functions and space curves. Differential and integral calculus of functions of several variables. Line integrals and surface integrals and classic vector calculus theorems. Examples from life sciences and physical science applications.

Prerequisite: ( MAT135H1/​MATA30H3/MATA31H3, MAT136H1/​MATA36H3/MATA37H3)/MAT135Y5/ MAT137Y1/​MAT137Y5/ MAT157Y1/​MAT157Y5
Exclusion: MAT237Y1, MAT257Y1, MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MAT232H5, MAT233H5, MAT236H5, MAT368H5, MAT291H & MAT294H
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT237Y1 - Multivariable Calculus

Hours: 72L

Sequences and series. Uniform convergence. Convergence of integrals. Elements of topology in R^2 and R^3. Differential and integral calculus of vector valued functions of a vector variable, with emphasis on vectors in two and three dimensional euclidean space. Extremal problems, Lagrange multipliers, line and surface integrals, vector analysis, Stokes' theorem, Fourier series, calculus of variations.

Prerequisite: MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1/​( MAT135H1, MAT136H1(90%))/( MAT136H1(70%), MAT138H1(70%)), MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1
Exclusion: MAT235Y1, MAT257Y1, MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3 & MAT368H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT244H1 - Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations

Hours: 36L

First order ordinary differential equations: Direction fields, integrating factors, separable equations, homogeneous equations, exact equations, autonomous equations, modeling. Existence and uniqueness theorem. Higher order equations: Constant coefficient equations, reduction of order, Wronskian, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters. Solutions by series and integrals. First order linear systems, fundamental matrices. Non-linear equations, phase plane, stability. Applications in life and physical sciences and economics.

Prerequisite: ( MAT135H1/​MATA35H3/MATA30H3/MATA31H3, MAT136H1/​MATA36H3/MATA37H3)/MAT135Y5/ MAT137Y1/​MAT137Y5/ MAT157Y1/​MAT157Y5, MAT223H1/​MATA23H3/MAT223H5/ MAT240H1/​MAT240H5
Corequisite: MAT235Y1/​ MAT237Y1/​ MAT257Y1
Exclusion: MAT267H1, MAT212H5, MAT258Y5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT247H1 - Algebra II

Hours: 36L

A theoretical approach to real and complex inner product spaces, isometries, orthogonal and unitary matrices and transformations. The adjoint. Hermitian and symmetric transformations. Spectral theorem for symmetric and normal transformations. Polar representation theorem. Primary decomposition theorem. Rational and Jordan canonical forms. Additional topics including dual spaces, quotient spaces, bilinear forms, quadratic surfaces, multilinear algebra.

Prerequisite: MAT240H1/​MAT240H5
Corequisite: MAT157Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT257Y1 - Analysis II

Hours: 72L/48T

Topology of R^n; compactness, functions and continuity, extreme value theorem. Derivatives; inverse and implicit function theorems, maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Integration; Fubini's theorem, partitions of unity, change of variables. Differential forms. Manifolds in R^n; integration on manifolds; Stokes' theorem for differential forms and classical versions.

Prerequisite: MAT157Y1/​MAT157Y5, MAT247H1/​MAT247H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT267H1 - Advanced Ordinary Differential Equations

Hours: 36L/12T

A theoretical course on Ordinary Differential Equations. First-order equations: separable equations, exact equations, integrating factors. Variational problems, Euler-Lagrange equations. Linear equations and first-order systems. Fundamental matrices, Wronskians. Non-linear equations. Existence and uniqueness theorems. Method of power series. Elementary qualitative theory; stability, phase plane, stationary points. Oscillation theorem, Sturm comparison. Applications in mechanics, physics, chemistry, biology and economics.

Prerequisite: MAT157Y1/​MAT157Y5, MAT247H1/​MAT247H5
Corequisite: MAT257Y1
Exclusion: APM288H1, MAT244H1, MATB44H3, MAT242H5, MAT252H5, MAT234H1, MAT292H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT309H1 - Introduction to Mathematical Logic

Hours: 36L

Predicate calculus. Relationship between truth and provability; Gödel's completeness theorem. First order arithmetic as an example of a first-order system. Gödel's incompleteness theorem; outline of its proof. Introduction to recursive functions.

Prerequisite: MAT223H1/​MATA23H3/MAT223H5/ MAT240H1/​MAT240H5, MAT235Y1/​MAT235Y5/(MATB41H3, MATB42H3)/ MAT237Y1/​(MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/MAT237Y5, MAT246H1/​ CSC236H1/​ CSC240H1 (These Prerequisites will be waived for students who have MAT257Y1)
Exclusion: CSC438H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT315H1 - Introduction to Number Theory

Hours: 36L

Elementary topics in number theory: arithmetic functions; polynomials over the residue classes modulo m, characters on the residue classes modulo m; quadratic reciprocity law, representation of numbers as sums of squares.

Prerequisite: ( MAT223H1/​MATA23H3/MAT223H5/ MAT240H1/​MAT240H5, MAT235Y1/​MAT235Y5/(MATB41H3, MATB42H3)/ MAT237Y1/​(MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/MAT237Y5, MAT246H1/​ CSC236H1/​ CSC240H1)/ MAT157Y1/​MAT157Y5/ MAT247H1/​MAT247H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT327H1 - Introduction to Topology

Hours: 36L

Metric spaces, topological spaces and continuous mappings; separation, compactness, connectedness. Fundamental group and covering spaces. Brouwer fixed-point theorem. Students in the math specialist program wishing to take additional topology courses are advised to obtain permission to take MAT1300H, MAT1301H.

Prerequisite: MAT157Y1/​MAT157Y5/( MAT237Y1/​(MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/MAT237Y5, MAT246H1 and permission of the instructor)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT329Y1 - Concepts in Elementary Mathematics

Hours: 72L

This course is aimed at students intending to become elementary school teachers. Emphasis is placed on the formation and development of fundamental reasoning and learning skills required to understand and to teach mathematics at the elementary level. Topics may include: Problem Solving and Strategies, Sets and Elementary Logic, Numbers and Elements of Number Theory, Introductory Probability and Fundamentals of Geometry.

The course may include an optional practicum in school classrooms.

Prerequisite: MAT137Y1/​ MAT138H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT246H1 and any 5.0 FCE with a CGPA of at least 2.5
Exclusion: MAT382H5
Recommended Preparation: Participation in the practicum requires the presentation of an Ontario Police Report that declares suitability to work with minors and other special groups.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT332H1 - Introduction to Graph Theory

Hours: 36L

This course will explore the following topics: Graphs, subgraphs, isomorphism, trees, connectivity, Euler and Hamiltonian properties, matchings, vertex and edge colourings, planarity, network flows and strongly regular graphs. Participants will be encouraged to use these topics and execute applications to such problems as timetabling, tournament scheduling, experimental design and finite geometries.

Prerequisite: MAT224H1/​MATB24H3/MAT224H5/ MAT247H1/​MAT247H5
Corequisite: Recommended Corequisite: MAT301H1/​ MAT347Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT334H1 - Complex Variables

Hours: 36L

Theory of functions of one complex variable, analytic and meromorphic functions. Cauchy's theorem, residue calculus, conformal mappings, introduction to analytic continuation and harmonic functions.

Prerequisite: MAT223H1/​MATA23H3/MAT223H5/ MAT240H1/​MAT240H5, MAT235Y1/​MAT235Y5/(MATB41H3, MATB42H3)/ MAT237Y1/​(MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/MAT237Y5/ MAT257Y1
Exclusion: MAT354H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT335H1 - Chaos, Fractals and Dynamics

Hours: 36L

An elementary introduction to a modern and fast-developing area of mathematics. One-dimensional dynamics: iterations of quadratic polynomials. Dynamics of linear mappings, attractors. Bifurcation, Henon map, Mandelbrot and Julia sets. History and applications.

Prerequisite: MAT137Y1/​(MATA30H3, MATA31H3, MATA37H3)/MAT137Y5/ MAT157Y1/​MAT157Y5/ MAT235Y1/​MAT235Y5/(MATB41H3, MATB42H3)/ MAT237Y1/​(MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/MAT237Y5, MAT223H1/​MATA23H3/MAT223H5/ MAT240H1/​MAT240H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT336H1 - Elements of Analysis

Hours: 36L/12T

This course provides the foundations of analysis and rigorous calculus for students who will take subsequent courses where these mathematical concepts are central of applications, but who have only taken courses with limited proofs. Topics include topology of Rn, implicit and inverse function theorems and rigorous integration theory.

Prerequisite: MAT223H1/​MATA23H3/MAT223H5/ MAT240H1/​MAT240H5, MAT235Y1/​MAT235Y5/(MATB41H3, MATB42H3)/ MAT237Y1/​(MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/MAT237Y5
Exclusion: MAT257Y1, MAT337H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT337H1 - Introduction to Real Analysis

Hours: 36L

Construction of Real Numbers. Metric spaces; compactness and connectedness. Sequences and series of functions, power series; modes of convergence. Interchange of limiting processes; differentiation of integrals. Function spaces; Weierstrass approximation; Fourier series. Contraction mappings; existence and uniqueness of solutions of ordinary differential equations. Countability; Cantor set; Hausdorff dimension.

Prerequisite: MAT224H1/​MATB24H3/MAT224H5/ MAT247H1/​MAT247H5, MAT235Y1/​MAT235Y5/(MATB41H3, MATB42H3)/ MAT237Y1/​(MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/MAT237Y5, MAT246H1; NOTE: These Prerequisites will be waived for students who have MAT257Y1
Exclusion: MAT357H1 & MAT378H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT344H1 - Introduction to Combinatorics

Hours: 36L

Basic counting principles, generating functions, permutations with restrictions. Fundamentals of graph theory with algorithms; applications (including network flows). Combinatorial structures including block designs and finite geometries.

Prerequisite: MAT223H1/​MATA23H3/MAT223H5/ MAT240H1/​MAT240H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT347Y1 - Groups, Rings and Fields

Hours: 72L/24T

Groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Sylow theorems, Jordan-Hölder theorem, finitely generated abelian groups, solvable groups. Rings, ideals, Chinese remainder theorem; Euclidean domains and principal ideal domains: unique factorization. Noetherian rings, Hilbert basis theorem. Finitely generated modules. Field extensions, algebraic closure, straight-edge and compass constructions. Galois theory, including insolvability of the quintic.

Prerequisite: MAT257Y1/​(85% in MAT247H1/​MAT247H5)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT363H1 - Geometry of Curves and Surfaces

Hours: 36L

Curves and surfaces in 3-spaces. Frenet formulas. Curvature and geodesics. Gauss map. Minimal surfaces. Gauss-Bonnet theorem for surfaces. Surfaces of constant curvature.

Prerequisite: MAT224H1/​MATB24H3/MAT224H5/ MAT247H1/​MAT247H5, MAT237Y1/​(MATB41H3, MATB42H3, MATB43H3)/MAT237Y5/ MAT257Y1 ( MAT257Y1 can be taken concurrently)
Exclusion: MAT367H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT377H1 - Mathematical Probability

Hours: 36L/12T

This course introduces students to various topics in mathematical probability theory. Topics include basic concepts (such as probability, random variables, expectations, conditional probability) from a mathematical point of view, examples of distributions and stochastic processes and their properties, convergence results (such as the law of large numbers, central limit theorem, random series, etc.), various inequalities, and examples of applications of probabilistic ideas beyond statistics (for example, in geometry and computer science).

Prerequisite: MAT247H1/​MAT247H5, MAT257Y1
Exclusion: STA347H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT437H1 - K-Theory and C* Algebras

Hours: 36L

The theory of operator algebras was begun by John von Neumann eighty years ago. In one of the most important innovations of this theory, von Neumann and Murray introduced a notion of equivalence of projections in a self-adjoint algebra (*-algebra) of Hilbert space operators that was compatible with addition of orthogonal projections (also in matrix algebras over the algebra), and so gave rise to an abelian semigroup, now referred to as the Murray-von Neumann semigroup.

Later, Grothendieck in geometry, Atiyah and Hirzebruch in topology, and Serre in the setting of arbitrary rings (pertinent for instance for number theory), considered similar constructions. The enveloping group of the semigroup considered in each of these settings is now referred to as the K-group (Grothendieck's terminology), or as the Grothendieck group.

Among the many indications of the depth of this construction was the discovery of Atiyah and Hirzebruch that Bott periodicity could be expressed in a simple way using the K-group. Also, Atiyah and Singer famously showed that K-theory was important in connection with the Fredholm index. Partly because of these developments, K-theory very soon became important again in the theory of operator algebras. (And in turn, operator algebras became increasingly important in other branches of mathematics.)

The purpose of this course is to give a general, elementary, introduction to the ideas of K-theory in the operator algebra context. (Very briefly, K-theory generalizes the notion of dimension of a vector space.)

The course will begin with a description of the method (K-theoretical in spirit) used by Murray and von Neumann to give a rough initial classification of von Neumann algebras (into types I, II, and III). It will centre around the relatively recent use of K-theory to study Bratteli's approximately finite-dimensional C*-algebras---both to classify them (a result that can be formulated and proved purely algebraically), and to prove that the class of these C*-algebras---what Bratteli called AF algebras---is closed under passing to extensions (a result that uses the Bott periodicity feature of K-theory).

Students will be encouraged to prepare oral or written reports on various subjects related to the course, including basic theory and applications.

Prerequisite: 5.0 FCE from MAT, including MAT224H1/​ MAT247H1 and MAT237Y1/​ MAT257Y1.
Recommended Preparation: Students are encouraged to execute basic research that answers the question, what is an abelian group?
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MGY480Y1 - Special Research Project

An opportunity for specialized individual research in molecular genetics and microbiology by arrangement with the course coordinator. Students are required to perform an original reserach project and attend relevant research seminars. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: ( MGY314H1/​ MGY315H1/​ MGY379Y1/​ MGY380H1/​ MGY381H1), ( MGY311Y1/​ BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MST300H1 - Alexander the Great in the Middle Ages

Hours: 24L/12T

Alexander the Great (356-323 BCE), king of Macedon, was one of the most successful military campaigners the world has ever seen. By the time he was thirty, he had established a vast empire stretching from Greece in the west to India in the east. Fantastic stories and legends about Alexander the Great circulated throughout the medieval world, from Iceland to Iran and from Ethiopia to England. In this course, we explore what different representations of the same figure can tell us about the range of medieval cultures. Through the use of digital tools, students and the instructor work together to explore this rich material. We trace the transmission of Alexander’s legend using digital maps. We compare different versions of the same story using text analysis tools. And we curate a small selection of the lavishly-illustrated manuscripts of the Alexander Romance in a digital exhibition.

Prerequisite: MST201H1, or MST202H1, or Permission of Instructor
Exclusion: None
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MUS120Y1 - Vocal and Instrumental Ensembles I

Hours: 144P

Students rehearse and perform in concerts and reading sessions as assigned by the Faculty of Music. Provides experience in choral groups, orchestra, or in concert band and large wind groups of diverse instrumentation. Development of musicianship skills through performance of large ensemble works; emphasis on sight-reading, ear-training, and musical knowledge.

Attendance at all sessions is required. Placement audition and permission of the Department required.Download the excerpt that is relevant to the instrument you would like to audition on; excerpts will be available at www.music.utoronto.ca beginning early July. Complete and return the MUS120Y1 & MUS220Y1 Audition Request Form before August 15, 2019.

Once your request form is received, you will be notified of your audition time. Placement audition will be held on September 3rd, 4th or 5th, 2019 in the Edward Johnson Building. The audition will be 10 minutes in length.

Exclusion: MUS291Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MUS220Y1 - Vocal and Instrumental Ensembles II

Hours: 144P

Students rehearse and perform in concerts and reading sessions as assigned by the Faculty of Music. Provides experience in choral groups, orchestra, or in concert band and large wind groups of diverse instrumentation. Development of musicianship skills through performance of large ensemble works; emphasis on sight-reading, ear-training, and musical knowledge. Attendance at all sessions is required. Placement audition and permission of the Department required. Download the excerpt that is relevant to the instrument you would like to audition on; excerpts will be available at www.music.utoronto.ca beginning early July. Complete and return the MUS120Y1 & MUS220Y1 Audition Request Form before August 15, 2019. Once your request form is received, you will be notified of your audition time. Placement audition will be held on September 3rd, 4th or 5th, 2019 in the Edward Johnson Building. The audition will be 10 minutes in length.

Prerequisite: MUS120Y1. Placement audition and permission of the Department required.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW101H1 - The Everyday Politics of Food

Hours: 12L/24S

How often do we reflect on the environmental, social and economic impact of our everyday food choices? This course offers an introduction to the key concepts, terms and theories that underlie our current food system. The course links the food we eat to global forces and considers how these forces affect food distribution, access and consumption. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW102H1 - Exploring Multilingual Toronto

Hours: 12L/24S

How does language connect and divide people, places and communities? This course considers how interactions between people in Toronto are shaped by language as well as history, economy, architecture and urban landscapes. Students engage with the city both in and out of class to think about a range of questions linked to gender and sexuality, indigeneity, migration, race, ethnicity, and public/private space. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW101H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW103H1 - Digital Technology and Society

Hours: 12L/24S

While the internet and other forms of digital technology have created new forms of social relationships and widened access to information, they have also raised concerns. This course explores issues such as surveillance, addiction and bullying as well as the potential of digital technologies (e.g. smart cities, Big Data, and the internet of things). The course engages students' own experience of digital technology. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW104H1 - Creating Community: Art, Identity and Belonging

Hours: 12L/24S

How is art implicated in the process of community building? How does art foster a sense of community identity and belonging? This course explores how communities, in Toronto and beyond, engage a variety of art forms including graffiti, spoken-word, hip-hop, digital art, traditional dance and music to connect people and express community identity. Students will have the opportunity to visit community arts projects. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW106H1 - Science, Health and Social Justice

Hours: 12L/24S

How can scientific knowledge and research be mobilized to impact individual and global health? How is health impacted by social, racial and economic inequalities? This course explores scientific research and practice with special attention to the translation of scientific knowledge in the public sphere, and its ability to inform policies, practices and laws. Students have the opportunity to meet with clinician-scientists, policy-makers, and other professionals connected to the health care system. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI, SMC, TRI, UC, VIC, WDW One, Munk One; NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW111H1 - Food, Ethics and Sustainability

Hours: 12L/24S

How do we produce and ensure access to nutritious and environmentally sustainable food for all? This course explores what is involved in achieving ethical food production and food security, examining topics such as: the paradox of food waste amidst scarcity, the relationship between food production and climate change, community-led alternatives to dominant food systems, and the role of biotechnology. Research projects allow students to focus on an issue of particular interest. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1/​Permission of the New One Coordinator
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW112H1/​ NEW113H1/​ NEW114H1/​ NEW115H1/​ NEW116H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW112H1 - Language Freedom and Power

Hours: 12L/24S

How do we imagine a balance between the need for communication, freedom of expression, and protection for marginalized groups? This course considers how language shapes and is shaped by the relations of power not only in such sites as colonies, nations and institutions, but also in popular culture and how we communicate online. It explores the key role of language in activism and youth cultures and allows students to focus on an issue of particular interest. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1/​Permission of the New One Coordinator
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW111H1/​ NEW113H1/​ NEW114H1/​ NEW115H1/​ NEW116H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW113H1 - Unpacking Digital Technology

Hours: 12L/24S

What are the social and material implications of the digital technologies we use every day - for the present and for the future? This course explores how digital technologies have been remaking the world and affecting our lives by tracing their historical development, their social effects, and the impact of their physical presence. It also peers into scenarios of the future in this digital world. Students engage in research on a topic of their own interest. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1/​Permission of the New One Coordinator
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW111H1/​ NEW112H1/​ NEW114H1/​ NEW115H1/​ NEW116H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW114H1 - Art for Social Change

Hours: 12L/24S

How does art contribute to social change? Artistic productions can draw attention to social problems, mobilize support for and symbolize social movements, and inspire new visions for imagined futures. This course will explore case studies of the role of various art forms in relation to past and current social change initiatives. Students will have the opportunity to engage in research on an art project of their choice. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1/​Permission of the New One Coordinator
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW111H1/​ NEW112H1/​ NEW113H1/​ NEW115H1/​ NEW116H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW115H1 - Current Issues Without Borders II

Hours: 12L/24S

Building on the integrated learning from any New One course, this course explores, in more depth, the social and ethical implications of a current issue exemplifying the themes of "Learning without Borders." Normally, this course would address the same current issues as offered in NEW105H1 in the preceding term. The course also considers examples of policy and community organizing responses. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1/​Permission of the New One Coordinator
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW111H1/​ NEW112H1/​ NEW113H1/​ NEW114H1/​ NEW116H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW116H1 - Science and Global Threats

Hours: 12L/24S

What is the role of science in addressing current global threats? What are the possibilities and the limitations of scientific research and knowledge in tackling complex problems such as climate change, pandemics and pollution? In this course, students explore these questions by examining case studies, meeting with specialists in various scientific fields, and engaging in research on a topic of their own choice. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​ NEW106H1, or permission of the New One Coordinator
Exclusion: INI, SMC, TRI, UC, VIC, WDW One, Munk One; NEW111H1/​ NEW112H1/​ NEW113H1/​ NEW114H1/​ NEW115H1
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW214H1 - Socially Engaged Buddhism

Hours: 24L

Socially Engaged Buddhism applies traditional Buddhist spiritual, ethical and social teachings to improve society. This course will focus on contemporary movements in Vietnam, Tibet, China & Taiwan, Sri Lanka, Thailand and India, as well as its ramifications in the West that have inspired movements such as Buddhist prison ministries and the Peacemaker Order.

Exclusion: NEW214Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW334H1 - Science of Wisdom: Buddhist and Western Traditions

Hours: 36L

Provides a conceptual and practical exploration of several ancient wisdom traditions. Buddhist approaches to self-actualization and wisdom will be compared to several other wisdom traditions (e.g. Mesopotamia, classical Greece, Christianity, Renaissance, etc.) Includes guided experiential exercises for each of the wisdom traditions.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232H1/​ NEW232Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW338H1 - Exploring Mindful Awareness

Hours: 36L

Mindfulness meditation is a systematic investigation of subjective experience. Classic and modern descriptions of mindfulness and the recent scientific literature are surveyed. In addition to exploring a variety of meditative practices in the class, students are also required to maintain an ongoing meditation practice outside of class time over the duration of the course.

Prerequisite: NEW232H1/​ NEW232Y1/​ NEW332H1/​ NEW333H1/​ NEW334H1/​ NEW335H1/​ NEW339H1
Exclusion: NEW432H1 (Advanced Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health: Cultivating Consciousness), offered in Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Summer 2015, and Winter 2016
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW339H1 - Yogacara Buddhism and Western Psychology

Hours: 36L

A comparative study of the nature of mind in Indian Yogacara Buddhism and modern psychology. Yogacara Buddhist teachings address the three aspects of mind, the storehouse consciousness, and the theory of consciousness-only, allowing an interdisciplinary dialogue with modern scientific understandings of the mind in psychology.

Recommended Preparation: NEW232H1/​ NEW232Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW346H1 - Community Organizing and Global Solidarity

Hours: 24L

Considers, from an interdisciplinary perspective, the evolution of community organizations and non-profits in the context of neoliberalism, settler colonialism, and imperialism. Examines the inter-woven relations of political economy, local community development, marginalized communities in Canada, and emergent forms of global/local solidarity.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW430H1 - Jungian Psychology and Tantric Buddhism

Hours: 36L

Jung wrote extensively on the benefits of Buddhism to personal development and transformation. This course explores the contribution of Jungian psychology to understanding Tantric (or Vajrayana) Buddhism. Through experiential exercises, students will investigate the role of archetypal psychology as a mediator of the spiritual transformation described in Tantric Buddhism.

Prerequisite: NEW232H1/​ NEW232Y1
Exclusion: NEW433H1 (Advanced Special Topics in Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health: The Psychology of Tantric Buddhism), offered in Winter 2015 and Winter 2016
Recommended Preparation: NEW302Y1/​ NEW303H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW438H1 - Mindfulness Meditation: Science and Research

Hours: 36S

Critically evaluates the empirical research literature relevant to the study of mindfulness meditation. Conceptual, methodological and interpretive limitations of the scientific literature are discussed. Comparisons between the scientific models of mindfulness meditation and Buddhist descriptions will be made.

Prerequisite: A statistics course (e.g. PSY201H1, SOC202H1, STA220H1)
Recommended Preparation: NEW232H1/​ NEW232Y1/​ NEW331H1/​ NEW333H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

NEW496H1 - Independent Community Engaged Learning

Hours: 48P/12S

A placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers social justice issues and models community-engagement practice, supporting students’ experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (Offered only in special circumstances)

Recommended Preparation: NEW120Y1/​ NEW150Y1/​ NEW220H1/​ NEW221H1/​ NEW224Y1/​ NEW225H1/​ NEW226H1/​ NEW232H1/​ NEW232Y1/​ NEW240Y1/​ NEW241Y1/​ NEW270H1/​ HIS230H1/​ HIS231H1/​ other NEW courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW498H1 - Independent Community Engaged Research

Hours: 48P/12S

A placement-based course in which students gain experience and develop social research and professional skills working on projects initiated by community partners. The accompanying seminar reviews conventional and creative interdisciplinary research methodologies relevant to the social purpose sector while supporting students’ participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 9.0 FCE and successful completion of the application process.
Recommended Preparation: NEW120Y1/​ NEW150Y1/​ NEW220H1/​ NEW221H1/​ NEW224Y1/​ NEW225H1/​ NEW226H1/​ NEW232H1/​ NEW232Y1/​ NEW240Y1/​ NEW241Y1/​ NEW270H1/​ HIS230H1/​ HIS231H1/​ other NEW courses
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC103H1 - The Islamic World

Hours: 24L/12T

What makes a certain thing (a state, art, law) Islamic? When and how did what we think about as the Islamic today come about? How has “the Islamic” changed over time? With these questions in mind, this course introduces students to major peoples, events, intellectual currents, and institutions in Islamic history.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC260H1 - Why the Ancient Near East? Investigating the Great Transformations in Pre- and Proto- History

Hours: 36L

This is an experiential course that asks what it would have been like for people in the ancient Near East as their world underwent the profound changes wrought by domestication, farming, urbanism, and state formation. We focus on the sensory experiences of the body, and their effect upon the mind, by reconstructing and using spaces and objects that have come to define the archaeological periods from 10,000 to 2500 BCE. From circular communal buildings and the constraints and possibilities they offer, to replastering skulls and making hand-held figurines, to the performance of a ritual text, we link traditional teaching with walking a mile in ancient footwear. Participation in this course requires an active imagination and a willingness to get physical.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC284H1 - Topics in Judaism and Feminism: Conflict, Competition, Complement

Hours: 24L

Explores the interaction between Jewish religious and secular movements and feminism, focusing on conflicts between Jewish law (halakhah) and ideas of egalitarianism, particularly in legal disabilities for women connected to marriage and divorce, lack of access to high-level Torah study, and discrimination in public religious roles. Examines competition among the movements to include women in Torah study has led to, and the extent to which inclusion and egalitarianism have become a complement in Judaism. (Offered in alternate years, topic changes)

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NMC346H1 - Ancient Mesopotamia I: Sumerians and Akkadians

Hours: 24L

The political and cultural history of the peoples of ancient South-Western Asia from 3000 BCE to the destruction of Babylon by the Hittites ca. 1600 BCE. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: 3 FCEs in Humanities
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC360H1 - Archaeology of the Biblical World I: The Bronze Age

Hours: 24L

The archaeology of Syria-Palestine from prehistoric times until the end of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1200 BCE), with a special emphasis on the development of complex society, and inter-relations with the neighboring regions of Egypt and Syro-Mesopotamia. Attention will also be given to the history of archaeological research in the region, current field techniques and methods of archaeological analysis, and the relationship between archaeological evidence and contemporary written records, including the Hebrew Bible. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: 1 FCE in Humanities
Recommended Preparation: NMC102H1 or NMC104H1 or NMC260H1 or NMC262H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC361H1 - The Archaeology of the Biblical World II: The Iron Age

Hours: 24L

The archaeology of Syria-Palestine from the collapse of the Late Bronze Age until the Persian Period, with a special emphasis on the emergence of Israel and the small territorial nation-states of the eastern Mediterranean seaboard. Particular attention will be given to the relationship between the archaeological evidence and contemporary written records, including the Hebrew Bible. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: 1 FCE in Humanities
Recommended Preparation: NMC102H1 or NMC104H1 or NMC260H1 or NMC262H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC364H1 - Art and Archaeology of Syria

Hours: 36S

Discover the wonders of Syria’s past, from 10,000 year-old burials to the world heritage sites of Palmyra and the Citadel of Aleppo. Explore headless skeletons, royal marriages, desert castles and Roman streetscapes.

Prerequisite: 3 FCE in any field
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC377Y1 - The Ottoman Empire to 1800

Hours: 48L

A survey of the Ottoman Empire from its late 13th/early 14th century origins as a border principality through the classical age of Mehmed the Conqueror and Süleyman the Magnificent when as a mature Islamic empire it ruled lands in Europe, Asia, and Africa, to the internal and external challenges faced by the empire during the 17th and 18th centuries when it underwent substantial transformation. Coverage includes topics in Ottoman institutions, economy, society, and culture. (Offered in alternate years)

Prerequisite: NMC273Y1
Exclusion: NMC377H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC465H1 - Ceramic Analysis

Hours: 6P/24S

A survey of methods of classification and analysis (form, fabric and style) involved in the study of archaeological ceramics, and the use of ceramics to infer patterns of production, distribution, and social organization; linking research questions with appropriate analytical techniques.

Prerequisite: 9 FCEs in any field
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC466H1 - Near Eastern Ceramics

Hours: 6P/24S

An introduction to the basic corpus of Near Eastern ceramics, from the invention of pottery production in the Neolithic until the Persian period, utilizing existing collections at the University and in the Royal Ontario Museum.

Prerequisite: 9 FCEs in any field
Recommended Preparation: ARH312Y1 or NMC264H1 or NMC360H1 or NMC361H1 or NMC464H1 or NMC465H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC467H1 - Seminar in Egyptian Archaeology I

Hours: 24S

Seminar focuses on the social and cultural development of Egypt from the Predynastic Period through the Middle Kingdom, engaging with major theories regarding social complexity, state formation, urbanism, social organization, and regionalism. An independent research project and hands-on experience with artifacts at the ROM are important features of the course. (Offered every 3 years.)

Prerequisite: NMC101H1 or NMC343H1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC468H1 - Seminar in Egyptian Archaeology II

Hours: 24S

Seminar focuses on the social and cultural development of Egypt from the Middle Kingdom through the Ptolemaic Period, engaging with major theories regarding urbanism, ethnicity, core-periphery relationships, cultural interaction, and social organization. An independent research project and hands-on experience with artifacts at the ROM are important features of the course. (Offered every 3 years.)

Prerequisite: NMC101H1 or NMC344H1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML305Y1 - Introductory Akkadian

Hours: 48S

Introduction to Old Babylonian. Grammar and the reading of selected texts. (Offered in alternate years)

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML370Y1 - Intermediate Turkish

Hours: 96L

This course involves reading, grammatical analysis and translation of modern Turkish texts of intermediate difficulty. The reading materials are selected from a wide range of literary genres. Included is a basic review of grammar as well as more advanced grammatical topics. Course serves as preparation for advanced study of Turkish as well as study of Ottoman Turkish language and literature.

Prerequisite: NML270Y1 or permission of instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML463H1 - Iranian Languages in the Path of History and Civilization

Hours: 24S

This interdisciplinary course focuses on chronological development of Persian language from Old Persian (551 BC) to Modern Persian (7th century) with the emphasis on the word formation and grammar. This course also examines the role of language in maintaining cultural identity and civilization through structural analysis of Iranian languages including Farsi, Dari, Tajiki, Baluchi, Kurdish and Pashtu.

Prerequisite: NML360Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NML466H1 - Theory and Practice of Translation from and into Persian

Hours: 24S

An introduction to theories and techniques involved in English/Persian translation, focusing on translation practice and theoretical discussions on linguistic, cognitive, socio-political, and cultural aspects of translation. Through analysis and application of translation theory, students practice the art of translation and develop awareness of issues that translators face.

Prerequisite: NML360Y1 or permission of instructor
Corequisite: N/A
Exclusion: N/A
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

PCJ260Y1 - Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies

Previous Course Number: PCS260Y1, UNI110Y1, UNI260Y1
Hours: 72L

The course reviews theories exploring the causes of conflict, the possibilities for the pursuit of peace, and the role of justice in both. Drawing on a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, including political science, psychology, sociobiology, economics, and religion, it offers an introduction to diverse approaches to conflict resolution and peace-building. After examining the role of individual characteristics, social group dynamics, and structural processes in generating conflict, the course interrogates different conceptions of peace and justice as well as the dilemmas involved in pursuing them in practice. Case studies and examples are used to help students apply the conceptual tools they acquire to prominent world conflicts.

Prerequisite: Only for current PCJ program students in second year and higher/permission of the Program Director
Exclusion: PCS260Y1, UNI110Y1, UNI260Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCJ360H1 - Topics in Peace, Conflict and Justice: Fairness

Hours: 24L

The difference between peace and conflict can hinge on agreement or disagreement about what is just and fair. This course explores fairness from multiple perspectives to shed light on why a shared conception of fairness is often hard to achieve. Through recent readings from developmental, social, moral and cultural psychology, as well as behavioral economics, students gain a practical understanding of the current state of the psychological science research on the topic. Students are asked to critically examine the implications of the existing evidence for an understanding of the universality and diversity inherent in fairness judgments. Crucially, students apply their learning to historical and contemporary conflicts, from inside the home to across national boundaries.

Prerequisite: PCJ260Y1 or permission of the Program Director.
Exclusion: PCS360Y1, UNI360Y1
Recommended Preparation: POL208Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCJ361H1 - Special Topics in Peace, Conflict and Justice Studies

Hours: 24S

An exploration of selected issues in the field of Peace, Conflict and Justice involving an overseas and/or practicum component.

Exclusion: PCS361H1, UNI361Y1
Recommended Preparation: POL208Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

PCJ362H1 - Service Learning

Students are given a service learning placement in the GTA in partnership with local, national, or international not-for-profits or governmental organizations. Students work in teams of 2-7 students, and help partner organizations solve important problems. Student teams mostly work independently of the organization, while receiving some mentoring, critique, and advice from the organizations. Students are expected to invest 5-7 hours per week in course projects, in addition to class time. In this non-competitive course, students are asked to engage in deep personal reflection, help teammates, advise other teams, and contribute their skills and talents to their community partners. The course will emphasize how groups work to achieve community goals, how grassroots politics works, the power of social capital, and how these topics link to questions of conflict resolution, brokering piece, and achieving justice.

Prerequisite: PCJ260Y1
Exclusion: PCJ361H1, PCJ363H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCJ363H1 - Study Abroad Module

Using Quercus, Skype, and email, students meet weekly in a virtual class that will assign readings, provide written assignments, and require a final assignment. Students are asked to situate their training from the PCJ program within the context of their academic study abroad experiences, though they may also have the opportunity to reflect on volunteer, activist, and social experiences. In written assignments, students are required to reflect on how their thinking has been influenced by their study abroad experiences, what they will do with their new perspectives upon returning to the University of Toronto, and how these affect how they think about peace, conflict, and justice.

Prerequisite: PCJ260Y1
Exclusion: PCJ361H1, PCJ362H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCJ460H1 - Causes and Consequences of Civil Wars and Violence

Previous Course Number: PCS460H1, UNI460H1
Hours: 24S

This course explores the links between violent conflict and socioeconomic development. It focuses on the macro- and micro-level processes leading to conflict and how conflict and political violence affect people's lives at the household and community levels. It also examines how these micro-level processes are linked to wider political and economic issues, including governance and institutional development. Tools from economic theory are applied alongside country-specific and cross-national empirical evidence.

Prerequisite: PCJ360H1 and PCJ362H1, or permission of the Program Director; enrolment restricted to students enrolled in Peace, Conflict and Justice Specialist program
Exclusion: PCS460H1, PCS460Y1, UNI460H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCJ461H1 - Research Methods in Peace, Conflict and Justice

Previous Course Number: PCS461H1, UNI460Y1
Hours: 48S

This course guides each student through their own individual research project, embedded in an interactive group learning process, in order to offer an applied introduction to research methods for peace, conflict and justice studies. Students work through the full research process, including: identifying a research question, learning how to conduct effective literature reviews, developing a rigorous research design, and applying quantitative and qualitative methods to answering questions. Rather than conducting research independently or studying research methods in isolation, the course combines the two: students learn collectively about the different steps in the research process while simultaneously applying those steps to their own research project. This is then complemented by presenting that research and discussing different research projects in class, so as to receive continuous feedback and be exposed to a variety of research methods and approaches.

Prerequisite: PCJ460H1; enrolment restricted to students enrolled in the Peace, Conflict and Justice Specialist program
Exclusion: PCS460Y1, PCS461H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCJ499H1 - Peace and Conflict Studies Independent Study Course

Previous Course Number: PCS499H1

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore topics not covered in the curriculum, or to develop a more detailed focus on topics covered. Approval of the program director is required. The student must obtain written agreement of the instructor who will supervise the independent study, submit the proposal to and obtain approval from the director and program administrator, who will then add the student to the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Applications are due two weeks before course enrollment deadlines for each semester.

Prerequisite: PCJ260Y1
Exclusion: PCS499H1
Recommended Preparation: For students enrolled in the Peace, Conflict and Justice Major or Specialist program.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCJ499Y1 - Peace and Conflict Studies Independent Study Course

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore topics not covered in the curriculum, or to develop a more detailed focus on topics covered. Approval of the program director is required. The student must obtain written agreement of the instructor who will supervise the independent study, submit the proposal to and obtain approval from the director and program administrator, who will then add the student to the course. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Applications are due two weeks before course enrollment deadlines for each semester.

Prerequisite: PCJ260Y1
Exclusion: PCS499H1
Recommended Preparation: For students enrolled in the Peace, Conflict and Justice Major or Specialist program.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCL201H1 - Introduction to Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetic Principles

Hours: 36L/6T

A general introduction to the principles of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. Topics include chemical (drug) absorption, distribution, biotransformation, elimination; the calculation of dosages and pharmacokinetic parameters, variability in drug response, adverse drug reactions and special interest topics.

Prerequisite: BIO130H1
Corequisite: Recommended Co-requisites: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, PSL300H1/​ PSL301H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL302H1 - Pharmacodynamic Principles

Hours: 36L

Topics include biological action of drugs on membranes, enzymes, receptors, neural and hormonal systems, transmission and modulation.

Prerequisite: ( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Recommended Preparation: PCL201H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL345H1 - Experimental Approaches in Drug Discovery

Hours: 24L

Lecturers use their own research to demonstrate how they approach a biological question. The lectures emphasize why one approach is chosen over other possible approaches, and explain the strengths and limitations of techniques. Following the one-hour lecture there is an interactive discussion of the experimental approach covered in the lecture.

Prerequisite: One of PSL300H1/​ PSL301H1/​ BIO270H1/​ BIO271H1, and completion of at least 10.0 FCE, or permission of Department
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1, PCL201H1, PCL302H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL362H1 - Introductory Toxicology

Hours: 27L/5T

Toxicological problems encountered in animals and humans; biochemical mechanisms and clinical factors of toxicological significance; models of drug-related diseases.

Prerequisite: BIO130H1, PCL201H1 or Permission of the Department
Corequisite: Recommended Co-requisite: PCL302H1, BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1, CHM247H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL389H1 - Understanding the Role of Pharmacology and Toxicology in Society

Hours: 24L

This service learning course explores issues surrounding the effects that pharmaceuticals and chemicals have in society. Specifically, it integrates pharmacology and toxicology with social, health and political issues as they relate to drug abuse and addiction. Students are required to interact and work with community partners during the semester (approx 20hrs). Classroom discussions will integrate community experiences with lecture material.

Prerequisite: PCL201H1
Corequisite: PCL302H1; ( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL397Y0 - Research Abroad in Pharmacology and Toxicology

Hours: 200P

An independent research project in a pharmacology and/or toxicology laboratory in an approved partner university. This international research experience will be supervised by a faculty member at the partner institution and will allow students to develop critical thinking and evaluation skills while applying their knowledge and trouble shooting skills to practical research questions. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: PCL201H1 (65%), PSL300H1 (65%), PSL301H1 (65%); permission from the Undergraduate Coordinator
Recommended Preparation: PCL302H1 (65%)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL469H1 - Systems Pharmacology I

Previous Course Number: PCL470Y1
Hours: 31L/4T

A culmination of pharmacological principles discussing concepts of drug properties and their interactions within the body. The mechanism of action, pharmacological properties including clinical use and adverse effects of drugs acting on the autonomic nervous systems, cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems will be examined. Critical evaluation of primary literature and examination of clinical problem-based case studies will be integrated with lecture material through small group sessions.

Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, ( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Exclusion: PCL470Y1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL470H1 - Systems Pharmacology II

Previous Course Number: PCL470Y1
Hours: 31L/4T

A culmination of pharmacological principles discussing concepts of drug properties and their interactions within the body. The mechanism of action, pharmacological properties including clinical use and adverse effects of drugs acting on the central nervous systems and immunological system; antimicrobial and cancer chemotherapeutic agents as well as the potential therapeutic use of endogenous/herbal compounds will be examined. Critical evaluation of primary literature and examination of clinical problem-based case studies will be integrated with lecture material through small group sessions.

Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, ( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Exclusion: PCL470Y1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL472Y1 - Project in Pharmacology

This course affords students an opportunity for hands-on research experience in a laboratory or applied pharmacology setting. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty member and will submit a final written report and oral presentation. Enrollment is limited and requires permission from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. It is the student’s responsibility to secure a placement with an approved supervisor before the course begins (a list of potential supervisors can be obtained from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology). Students will be registered in the course once their ballot form (obtained from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology) is signed by an approved supervisor and approved by the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. Students are expected to spend approximately 200 hours towards this project but this will be project/supervisor dependent. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PCL366H1/​ PCL367H1/​ PCL368H1, STA288H1/​ PCL376H1, and permission of Department
Exclusion: PCL474Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL474Y1 - Project in Toxicology

This course affords students an opportunity for hands-on research experience in a laboratory or applied toxicology setting. Students will work under the supervision of a staff member and will submit a final written report and oral presentation. Enrollment is limited and requires permission from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. It is the student’s responsibility to secure a placement with an approved supervisor before the course begins (a list of potential supervisors can be obtained from the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology). Students will be registered in the course once their ballot form (obtained from the Department of Pharmacology) is signed by an approved supervisor and approved by the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. Students are expected to spend approximately 200 hours towards this project but this will be project/supervisor dependent. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PCL366H1/​ PCL367H1/​ PCL368H1, STA288H1/​ PCL376H1, and permission of Department
Exclusion: PCL472Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL481H1 - The Molecular and Biochemical Basis of Toxicology

Hours: 24L

The biochemical principles and molecular mechanisms underlying the toxicity of drugs and foreign agents. The sequence of events at the molecular level leading to impairment of cell function and the factors which determine and affect toxicity.

Prerequisite: PCL302H1
Recommended Preparation: PCL362H1, BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL486H1 - Pharmacology of Cancer Signaling

Hours: 24L

This course will expand on both classical and cutting edge pharmacological strategies proposed to mitigate the consequences of altered signal transduction in cancer. Students will have the opportunity to develop knowledge on these molecular events and how they can be targeted to improve clinical outcomes. Students will integrate lecture material with assigned readings and assignments.

Prerequisite: PCL302H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PHL100Y1 - Introduction to Philosophy (Historical)

Hours: 48L/24T

An introduction to the central branches of philosophy, such as logic, theory of knowledge, metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy. Writings from the central figures in the history of Western and non-Western philosophy, as well as contemporary philosophers, may be considered.

Exclusion: PHL101Y1, PHL201H1, PHLA10H3, PHLA11H3, PHL101H5, PHL102H5, PHL105Y5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL237H1 - History of Chinese Philosophy

Hours: 36L

An historical and systematic introduction to the main phases of Chinese philosophical development, including Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Neo-Confucianism; the challenge of Western thought and the development of modern Chinese Philosophy.

Exclusion: EAS241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL281H1 - Bioethics

Hours: 36L

An introduction to the study of moral and legal problems in medical practice and in biomedical research; the development of health policy. Topics include: concepts of health and disease, patient rights, informed consent, allocation of scarce resources, euthanasia, abortion, genetic and reproductive technologies, human research, and mental health.

Exclusion: PHLB09H3, PHL283H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PHL314H1 - Kant

Hours: 36L

A systematic study of The Critique of Pure Reason.

Prerequisite: PHL210Y1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHLC37H3, PHL314H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL342H1 - Minds and Machines

Hours: 36L

Topics include: philosophical foundations of artificial intelligence theory; the computational theory of the mind; functionalism vs. reductionism; the problems of meaning in the philosophy of mind.

Prerequisite: 7.5 courses (in any field) including COG250Y1 or at least 1.5 in philosophy
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL367H1 - Philosophy of Feminism

Hours: 36L