Course Changes in the 2018-19 Calendar

This page includes all changes to courses since the 2017-18 Calendar. Any questions about the courses below should be directed to the relevant academic unit.

Use the filters at the top of each section to find changes by type of change, program area, breadth requirement or distribution requirement. 


Courses with Changes
(Title, Description, Prerequisites/Exclusions/Corequisites, and Breadth Requirements)

For Course Code, Title and Description
Prerequisites, Corequisites, Exclusions

ANA300Y1 - Human Anatomy and Histology

Hours: 86L/18P

Structure of the human body and its relationship to function. Basic Human Histology, Gross Anatomy, and Neuroanatomy. Some content is delivered using online modules.

Prerequisite: BIO130H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ANT412H1 - Historical Archaeology

Hours: 16L/8P

Introduces the problems, methods and some of the material culture of colonial and industrial archaeology with emphasis on Canada and colonial America. Covers the use of documentary evidence, maps, architecture, and a variety of artifact classes.

Prerequisite: ANT200Y1 or HIS374H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ANT456H1 - Queer Ethnography

Hours: 24L

This course explores, first, how and where forms of desire and sexual practice have become sites of anthropological inquiry and exemplars of particular cultural logics. Tracing, then, the transnational turn in the anthropology of sexuality, the course engages important debates about culture, locality, and globalization. By focusing on the transnational movement of desires, practices, and pleasures through activisms, mass media, and tourism, the course asks how sex is global and how globalization is thoroughly sexed. Course material will stress, but not be limited to, forms of same-sex or otherwise queer sexualities.

Prerequisite: ANT207H1 and any 300-level course in Society, Culture and Language
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

APM306Y1 - Mathematics and Law

Hours: 72L

This course examines the relationship between legal reasoning and mathematical logic; provides a mathematical perspective on the legal treatment of interest and actuarial present value; critiques ethical issues; analyzes how search engine techniques on massive databases transform legal research and considers the impact of statistical analysis and game theory on litigation strategies.

NOTE

This course counts as 0.5 FCE in BR3 and 0.5 FCE in BR5.

This course will only contribute 0.5FCE to the Math Minor program.

Prerequisite: ( MAT135H1/​ MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1, MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1
Exclusion: JUM206Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5); Society and its Institutions (3)

AST101H1 - The Sun and Its Neighbours

Hours: 24L/12T

Our place in the Universe. Phenomena we see in the sky. What we know about the Sun, the planets and comets, and the formation of the solar system – and how we know it. What makes planets suitable for life. Finding out about the nearest stars and their planets. This course is intended for students with no science or engineering background.

Exclusion: AST121H1, AST221H1. Also excluded are CIV100H1, CIV101H1, CIV102H1, any 100- or higher-series CHM/PHY courses taken previously or concurrently (with the exception of PHY100H1, PHY101H1, PHY201H1, PHY202H1, PHY205H1, PHY207H1, CHM101H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

AST201H1 - Stars and Galaxies

Hours: 24L/12T

What we know about the properties and life cycles of stars, of galaxies, and of the Universe itself – and how we know it. How astronomers develop methods for understanding phenomena that span such vast ranges in distance and time. This course is intended for students with no science or engineering background.

Exclusion: AST121H1, AST210H1, AST221H1, AST222H1. Also excluded are CIV100H1, CIV101H1, CIV102H1 and any 100- or higher-series CHM or PHY courses taken previously or concurrently (with the exception of PHY100H1, PHY101H1, PHY201H1, PHY202H1, PHY205H1, PHY207H1, CHM101H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

AST221H1 - Stars and Planets

Hours: 36L

The (astro)physics of stars and planets, their observed variety, their structure, formation and evolution. Introduction to telescopes and instrumentation.

Prerequisite: PHY132H1/​ PHY152H1; MAT136H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
Exclusion: AST101H1/​ AST201H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

AST251H1 - Life on Other Worlds

Hours: 24L/12T

Scholarly discussion of the probability that there are planets with life elsewhere in the universe, from the perspective of current ideas concerning the origin and evolution of the universe, the solar system and life. Search techniques and possibilities for interstellar travel and space colonies are discussed. Intended for life sciences students.

Prerequisite: AST101H1
Exclusion: AST221H1/​ AST222H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

BCH210H1 - Biochemistry I: Proteins, Lipids and Metabolism

Hours: 36L/24T

Proteins, enzymes, membranes and the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. This course is intended for students who are NOT taking BCH242Y1 as part of their program.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1 NOTE: CHM1** with COURSE EXCLUSION TO CHM135H1 AND CHM136H1 meet the Prerequisite requirement for BCH210H1. CHM110H5 & CHM120H5 (UTM) are equivalent to CHM135H1 ONLY. CHMA10H3 & CHMA11H3 (UTSC) are equivalent to CHM135H1 ONLY. CHMB41H3/​ CHMB42H3 (UTSC) are equivalent to CHM136H1 ONLY. CHM242H5 (UTM) is equivalent to CHM136H1 ONLY. Students with a SDF in CHM135H1/​ CHM136H1 are not permitted to enrol in BCH210H1 until a final passing grade (50%) appears on the transcript.
Exclusion: BCH242Y1, [ CHM361H5(UTM) and CHM362H5(UTM)], [ BIOC12H3(UTSC) and BIOC13H3(UTSC)], CHMB62H3(UTSC)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

BCH242Y1 - Introduction to Biochemistry

Hours: 64L/12T/14P

An introductory course that will serve as the foundation for BCH courses taken in Third and Fourth years by students specializing in biochemistry and related specialist programs. The major topics include protein structure, enzyme mechanisms, cellular and molecular biology, lipid and membrane structure and function, and carbohydrate, lipid, and amino acid metabolism and bioenergetics. Please note that there are five laboratories accompanying this course. (Lab fees:$10)

Prerequisite: ( CHM135H1, CHM136H1)/ CHM151Y1
Exclusion: BCH210H1 and BCH311H1, [ CHM361H5(UTM) and CHM362H5(UTM)], [ BIOC12H3 (UTSC) and BIOC13H3 (UTSC)], CHMB62H3(UTSC)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4); The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

BCH370H1 - Laboratory Course in Biochemical Techniques

Hours: 6L/42P

This course reinforces theoretical principles through experiments that encompass pH and buffers, spectrophotometry, chromatography, protein electrophoresis, enzyme kinetics and DNA isolation and analysis. Intended for students who are not proceeding further in biochemistry. It is highly recommended that students take this course in their third year as space is limited and priority will go to third-year students. cGPA of 2.5 is required for non-Biochemistry Majors and Specialists. This course will be offered in the FALL & WINTER terms. No enrolment will be permitted after the start of class. (Enrolment limited.) (Lab fees: $50)

Prerequisite: BCH210H1
Exclusion: BCH377H1, CHM379H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH377H1 - Biochemistry Laboratory I

Hours: 12L/48P

An introduction to fundamental laboratory techniques in modern biochemistry. Experiments illustrate and develop the concepts described in lecture courses and serve as a foundation for more advanced training in biochemistry laboratory courses. Enrollment in this course is generally restricted to students enrolled in the Biochemistry, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics & Microbiology (Genetics Stream) Specialist programs. (Lab fees: $25)

Prerequisite: BCH242Y1
Exclusion: BCH370H1, CHM379H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH428H1 - Genomics of microbial communities in human health and beyond

Hours: 24L/12P

There is a growing appreciation that microbes do not operate in isolation but form parts of larger populations and communities (microbiomes) with unique considerations for human health. This course will cover how genomics can be applied to analyze microbial communities and the transformative discoveries that continue to result.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1; BCH311H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ CSB349H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BCH478H1 - Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory

Hours: 24L/84P

Experiments extend students’ technical abilities as well as their knowledge and application of practical theory. This course is designed as an advanced successor in a progression of biochemistry laboratory experiences in BCH242Y1, BCH377H1 and BCH378H1 that will equip students with a spectrum of practical abilities that are of vital importance in scientific research. (Lab fees: $25)

Prerequisite: BCH340H1; BCH377H1; BCH378H1/​( CHM361H5 [UTM] + CHM362H5 [UTM]) + CHM371H5 [UTM]); MGY311Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

BIO251H1 - Form, Function and Development in Plants

Hours: 24L/18P

Introduction to structure, function, and ecology of vegetative and reproductive processes in plants with a focus on flowering plants and gymnosperms. Lectures and labs emphasize photosynthesis, respiration, mineral nutrition, transport processes, patterns of plant growth and development, the role of hormones in development, photomorphogenesis, and plant reproduction. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CAS201H1 - Global Asian Studies: Insights and Concepts

Previous Course Number: CAS200Y1
Hours: 24L

This course addresses Asia empirically in contemporary global formations and as an idea in the global imagination. It introduces students to concepts and theories central to  scholarship on Asia and its transnational formations. It provides foundational theoretical and conceptual material to understand global issues as they play out in the politics, economies, cultures and contemporary social worlds of contemporary Asian sites. Interdisciplinary analytical and research concepts are introduced to provide area studies grounding. This course provides preparation to delve into deeper research on Asia connected to broad questions about the nature of democracy, authoritarianism, market formation, social justice, and the media of cultural expression. It informs students aiming to take more advanced courses on Asia and globalization and provides one part of the foundation for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor. CAS201H1 introduces the theoretical and conceptual frameworks that are explored through further grounded empirical case studies in CAS202H1 (Global Asian Studies: Sites and Practices).

Prerequisite: 4 FCEs
Exclusion: CAS200Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CAS202H1 - Global Asian Studies: Sites and Practices

Previous Course Number: CAS200Y1
Hours: 24L

This inter-disciplinary course explores a variety of sites and topics in South, Southeast, and East Asia. It explores themes including contemporary and historical articulations of socio-economic development, (post)colonial political formations, urbanization processes, environmental change, political systems, religious formations, labour struggles, and gender studies. The course examines the diversity of Asian modernities, cross-regional linkages, and changing approaches to area studies over time. It provides the foundation for the Contemporary Asian Studies major and minor, preparing students for taking more advanced courses on Asia in the global context. CAS202H1 is a stand-alone course that may be taken following, prior to, or independent of its sister course, CAS201H1.

Exclusion: CAS200Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CDN225H1 - Asian Canadian Space & Place

Hours: 24L

A comprehensive examination of the socio-cultural dimensions of space and place in the contemporary Asian Canadian context. Explores Asian Canadian landscape, culture and heritage, place and identity formation, multiculturalism and nationalism, spatial conflict and contestation, and the political economy of cultural space.

Recommended Preparation: CDN267H1/​ CDN268H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CDN355H1 - Digital Media, Digital Makers

Hours: 24S

This course will introduce students to quantitative research tools developed through the Digital Humanities. Students will learn to use online text analytics tools in order to understand how quantitative methods can support critical academic research of the study of Canada. Quantitative digital analysis will be applied to a wide range of Canadian digital academic archives and community hubs.

Prerequisite: One of: CDN202H1/​ CDN205H1/​ CDN218H1/​ CDN221H1/​ CDN230H1/​ CDN267H1/​ CDN268H1/​ CDN367H1/​ CDN368H1/​ HIS263Y1/​ SOC218H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CDN390H1 - Chinese Canadian Studies (formerly UNI390H1)

Hours: 24S

This course examines socio-cultural, political and economic aspects of Chinese communities in Canada. It explores how the study of Chinese Canadians challenges and augments our understanding of issues such as immigration and diaspora, multiculturalism, and race and ethnicity.

Prerequisite: 4.0 FCEs or by permission of instructor
Exclusion: UNI390H1
Recommended Preparation: CDN230H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CHM210H1 - Chemistry of Environmental Change

Hours: 24L/12T

Examines the fundamental chemical processes of the Earth’s natural environment, and changes induced by human activity. Topics relate to the atmosphere: urban air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain; the hydrosphere: water resources and pollution, wastewater analysis; biogeochemistry and inorganic metals in the environment.

Prerequisite: CHM135H1/​ CHM139H1/​ CHM151Y1,( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
Exclusion: ENV235Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM217H1 - Introduction to Analytical Chemistry

Hours: 30L/6T/48P

Introduction to the science of chemical measurement, from sampling through analysis to the interpretation of results, including how water, food products, pharmaceuticals, and dietary supplements are analysed for content, quality, and potential contaminants. Also how to interpret experimental measurements, compare results and procedures, and calibrate analytical instrumentation. Through closely integrated lectures, laboratories, and tutorials, this highly practical course introduces a variety of analytical techniques including volumetric methods, potentiometry, uv/visible and infrared spectrophotometry, flame atomic absorption spectrometry, and chromatography. Additional information can be found at http://www.chem.utoronto.ca/coursenotes/CHM217/. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).

Prerequisite: ( CHM135H1/​ CHM139H1, CHM136H1/​ CHM138H1)/ CHM151Y1 with a minimum grade of 63%; ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
Exclusion: CHM211H5, CHMB16H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM222H1 - Introduction to Physical Chemistry (formerly CHM225Y1)

Hours: 24L/12T

Topics: introductory thermodynamics, first and second law and applications; chemical equilibrium; chemical kinetics; introductory quantum mechanics; spectroscopy. The course is intended for students who will be following one of the chemistry specialist programs (including Biological Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry) or who will be including a substantial amount of chemistry in their degree (such as those following a chemistry major program).

Prerequisite: [( CHM135H1/​ CHM139H1, CHM136H1/​ CHM138H1)/ CHM151Y1 with a minimum grade of 63%], ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1,( PHY131H1, PHY132H1)/( PHY151H1, PHY152H1)
Corequisite: MAT235Y1/​ MAT237Y1
Exclusion: CHM220H1/​ CHM225Y1, CHMB20H3, CHM221H5, JCP221H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM310H1 - Environmental Chemistry

Hours: 24L

This course considers carbon-containing molecules in the environment from a variety of perspectives: the carbon cycle, climate change and ocean acidification; fossil fuels and alternative energy sources; and the partitioning and degradation pathways of organic chemicals.

Prerequisite: ( CHM135H1/​ CHM139H1, CHM136H1/​ CHM138H1)/ CHM151Y1, ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CHM317H1 - Introduction to Instrumental Methods of Analysis

Hours: 24L/48P

Scope of instrumental analytical chemistry; Fourier transform IR absorption spectroscopy; molecular luminescence; emission spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; sensors; gas and high performance liquid chromatography; instrument design principles and applications in industry and the environment. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).

Prerequisite: CHM217H1 with a minimum grade of 63%; ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
Exclusion: CHM391H5, CHMC11H3, CHMC16H3
Recommended Preparation: ( CHM220H1/​ CHM222H1, CHM221H1/​ CHM223H1)/ CHM225Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CJH332H1 - Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology of the Synapse (Formerly CSB332H1)

Hours: 24L

Examination of all aspects of the synapse in both the peripheral and central nervous systems of invertebrates and vertebrates. Topics include: neuroplasticity, synapse formation, synaptic transmission, synaptic modulation, and the molecular biological basis of neurodegenerative disorders.

Prerequisite: BIO271H1/​ PSL300H1
Exclusion: CSB332H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

COG401H1 - Seminar in Cognitive Science

Hours: 36S

An advanced treatment of cognitive science topics for arts majors. Possible topics include: concepts, consciousness, the mind-body problem, cognitive science and the arts.

Prerequisite: 5.0 credits in courses listed in the cognitive science major.
Exclusion: COG402H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

COG402H1 - Seminar in Cognitive Science

Hours: 36S

An advanced treatment of cognitive science topics such as neuroscientific theories of consciousness, rationality and modelling of cognitive processes.

Prerequisite: 5.0 credits in courses listed in the cognitive science major.
Exclusion: COG401H1
Distribution Requirements: Science; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

COG403H1 - Seminar in Cognitive Science

Hours: 36S

Advanced treatment of cognitive science topics, including the application of core ideas from probability theory, information theory, statistics, and machine learning to modelling human cognition and artificial intelligence.

Prerequisite: 5.0 credits in courses listed in the cognitive science major, CSC148H1, ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1, 0.5 FCE in statistics
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

CRI386H1 - Origins of Criminal Justice

Hours: 36L

Criminal justice practice, as well as political debate concerning crime and criminal justice, are often influenced by ideas that are initially developed outside the criminal justice arena. This course examines the history, current influence and efficacy of a range of such ideas, such as: the role of religious practice in rehabilitating offenders; military service and participation in sports as preventive of delinquency; the influence of environmental pollution on crime rates; the concept of the ‘problem family’; intelligence based policing and the use of management theories in criminal justice organizations.

Note: The course may include an optional Service Learning component. If offered, additional information will be provided in the Faculty of Arts and Science's timetable.

Prerequisite: CRI205H1, CRI210H1
Exclusion: CRI390H1 Roots of Criminal Justice Policy taken in 20141/20151/20161.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI389Y0 - Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies Abroad

Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies offered in an international setting. The content may vary from year to year.Details are posted on the Summer Abroad website.

Prerequisite: Consult the Summer Abroad Program Office.
Exclusion: WDW389Y0
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI390H1 - Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

Hours: 36L

The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: 1 FCE from CRI205H1, CRI210H1, CRI225H1
Exclusion: WDW390H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI391H1 - Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

Hours: 36L

The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: 1 FCE from CRI205H1, CRI210H1, CRI225H1
Exclusion: WDW391H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI392H1 - Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

Hours: 36L

The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: 1 FCE from CRI205H1, CRI210H1, CRI225H1
Exclusion: WDW392H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI393H1 - Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

Hours: 36L

The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: 1 FCE from CRI205H1, CRI210H1, CRI225H1
Exclusion: WDW393H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI394H1 - Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

Hours: 36L

The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: 1 FCE from CRI205H1, CRI210H1, CRI225H1
Exclusion: WDW394H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI425H1 - The Prosecution Process

Hours: 24L

A critical examination of the process by which certain conduct is identified, prosecuted and punished as “crime”, and the process by which individuals become “criminals”. The evolution of the modern prosecution system, including the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, rules of evidence, socially constructed defences, disparity in sentencing, and wrongful convictions.

Prerequisite: CRI205H1, CRI210H1, CRI225H1, 0.5 CRI 300 level course
Exclusion: WDW320H1, WDW425H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI435H1 - Advanced Seminar in Policing

Hours: 24S

This course will explore policing in a comparative and historical context. Issues to be covered include the following: the maintenance of law and order before police forces; development of police forces in continental Europe and the English-speaking world; structure and function of national police forces around the world today; the role of political and secret police forces; and contemporary debates on the mission and regulation of the police in contemporary North America including issues such as police-community relations, private policing, and counter-terrorism.

Prerequisite: 2 CRI 300 half-credit lecture/seminar courses.
Exclusion: CRI3130H1, WDW435H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI445H1 - International Criminal Law

Hours: 24S

An advanced seminar focusing on the legal and conceptual framework for responding to state violence and war crimes, and the challenges faced by various international legal institutions. Legal doctrines of sovereign immunity and universal jurisdiction, the history of international criminal prosecutions, and substantive international criminal law are examined.

Prerequisite: 2 CRI 300 half-credit lecture/seminar courses
Exclusion: CRI3340H1, WDW425H1 taken in 2008-2009; WDW445H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI487H1 - Law, Space, and the City

Hours: 24S

An introduction to interdisciplinary studies of law and space, this course covers a broad range of topics, from work on empire and colonialism by legal historians and aboriginal scholars to studies of national spaces, urban spaces, and bodily spaces. Some background in either legal studies or cultural geography is desirable. Open to students in law, geography, anthropology, women/gender studies, and sociology, though permission of the instructor is required.

Prerequisite: 2 CRI 300 half-credit lecture/seminar courses
Exclusion: CRI3256H1 (when offered as a joint course), WDW487H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI490H1 - Advanced Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

Hours: 24S

The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications. Topics vary from year to year.

Prerequisite: 2 CRI 300 half-credit lecture/seminar courses
Exclusion: WDW490H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CRI491H1 - Advanced Topics in Criminology and Sociolegal Studies

Hours: 24S

Topics vary from year to year. The objective of the course is to explore emerging issues in Criminology, and their social, legal, ethical and political implications.

Prerequisite: 2 CRI 300 half-credit lecture/seminar courses
Exclusion: WDW491H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

CSB351Y1 - Introductory Virology

Hours: 48L/48T

An introduction to basic and medical virology. What you should know about viruses and the diseases they cause. Tutorials are optional.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO240H1/​ BIO241H1/​ BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB428H1 - Advanced Cell Biology II: Cell Polarity and Cytoskeletal Dynamics

Hours: 12L/12T/12S

This advanced course covers cell polarity and cytoskeletal dynamics emphasizing current literature. For each topic, the course examines (1) the proteins involved, (2) their interactions and regulation, and (3) how they organize specific cellular structures. The coordination of these complexes required for orchestrating complex cellular processes are addressed. These important topics of cell biology are pursued with question-driven lectures, and both round-table discussions and group presentations of research papers.

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of 73% in BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1, minimum grade of 73% in CSB328H1/​ CSB329H1/​ CSB331H1/​ CSB340H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB491H1 - Team-Based Research: Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

CSB491H1 will build on molecular biology and biochemistry approaches acquired in CSB350H1 to investigate the role of metabolic enzymes in plants. Students participating in this course will develop laboratory and team-work skills that are desirable for them to function in a research laboratory and in the workplace. The course will integrate current molecular biology techniques, including designing and characterizing mutants made with CRISPR/Cas9, identifying protein interactors, and performing structural and mechanistic analysis of metabolic enzymes. (Lab materials fee: $50.)

Prerequisite: CSB350H1 with a minimum grade of 77% and approval of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSB497H1 - Independent Research in Cell and Systems Biology I

An original research project (a literature review alone is not sufficient) requiring the prior consent of a member of the Department to supervise the project. The topic is to be mutually agreed upon by the student and supervisor. They must arrange the time, place, and provision of any materials and submit to the Undergraduate Office a signed form of agreement outlining details prior to being enrolled. In the Fall or Winter sessions, a commitment of 8-10 hours per week is expected for research and related course activities. If spread over both the Fall and Winter sessions, a commitment of 4-5 hours per week is expected. In the Summer Session, the number of hours doubles per week (e.g., 16-20 for F or S, or 8-10 for Y) as the length of the term is halved compared to the Fall or Winter term. Many students spend more than this amount of time as they become immersed in their project. This course is normally open only to fourth year students with adequate background in Cell and Systems Biology. Course requirements include a final report, and either an oral presentation (Summer and Fall sessions) or a poster presentation (Winter session). Monthly workshops are scheduled and highly recommended. Details for enrollment are available at http://csb.utoronto.ca/undergraduate-studies/undergraduate-courses/under.... (Lab Materials Fee: $25). Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

CSC165H1 - Mathematical Expression and Reasoning for Computer Science

Hours: 36L/24T

Introduction to abstraction and rigour. Informal introduction to logical notation and reasoning. Understanding, using and developing precise expressions of mathematical ideas, including definitions and theorems. Structuring proofs to improve presentation and comprehension. General problem-solving techniques. Running time analysis of iterative programs. Formal definition of Big-Oh. Diagonalization, the Halting Problem, and some reductions. Unified approaches to programming and theoretical problems.

Corequisite: CSC148H1/​( CSC108H1/​ CSC120H1/​ CSC121H1, MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1)
Exclusion: CSC236H1, CSC240H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC207H1 - Software Design

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to software design and development concepts, methods, and tools using a statically-typed object-oriented programming language such as Java. Topics from: version control, unit testing, refactoring, object-oriented design and development, design patterns, advanced IDE usage, regular expressions, and reflection. Representation of floating-point numbers and introduction to numerical computation.

Prerequisite: 60% or higher in CSC148H1 (Please note: The minimum prerequisite grade in CSC148H1 is lower than the minimum grade for program admission in Computer Science. If you take this course when your grade in CSC148H1 is lower than the requirement for program admission, you will be unable to enrol in a Computer Science program. If you hope to enrol in a Computer Science program in future, please ensure that you satisfy the program admission grade requirements in CSC148H1 and CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 before completing any 200-level course.)
Exclusion: CSC209H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC236H1 - Introduction to the Theory of Computation

Hours: 24L/12T

The application of logic and proof techniques to Computer Science. Mathematical induction; correctness proofs for iterative and recursive algorithms; recurrence equations and their solutions; introduction to automata and formal languages. This course assumes university-level experience with proof techniques and algorithmic complexity as provided by CSC165H1. Very strong students who already have this experience (e.g. successful completion of MAT157Y1) may consult the undergraduate office about proceeding directly into CSC236H1 or CSC240H1.

Prerequisite: 60% or higher in CSC148H1, 60% or higher in CSC165H1 (Please note: The minimum prerequisite grade in CSC148H1 and CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 is lower than the minimum grade for program admission in Computer Science. If you take this course when your grade in CSC148H1 or CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 is lower than the requirement for program admission, you will be unable to enrol in a Computer Science program. If you hope to enrol in a Computer Science program in future, please ensure that you satisfy the program admission grade requirements in CSC148H1 and CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1 before completing any 200-level course.)
Exclusion: CSC240H1, CSC263H1/​ CSC265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC343H1 - Introduction to Databases

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to database management systems. The relational data model. Relational algebra. Querying and updating databases: the query language SQL. Application programming with SQL. Integrity constraints, normal forms, and database design. Elements of database system technology: query processing, transaction management.

Prerequisite: CSC165H1/​ CSC240H1/​( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT135Y1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1; CSC207H1. Prerequisite for Engineering students only: ECE345H1/​ CSC190H1/​ CSC192H1
Exclusion: CSC443H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC411H1 - Machine Learning and Data Mining

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to methods for automated learning of relationships on the basis of empirical data. Classification and regression using nearest neighbour methods, decision trees, linear models, and neural networks. Clustering algorithms. Problems of overfitting and of assessing accuracy. Problems with handling large databases. Emphasis on statistical approaches.

Prerequisite: CSC263H1/​ CSC265H1, ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1, STA247H1/​ STA255H1/​ STA257H1, MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1
Exclusion: STA314H1
Recommended Preparation: CSC336H1/​ CSC350H1, STA248H1/​ STA250H1/​ STA261H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC412H1 - Probabilistic Learning and Reasoning

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to probability as a means of representing and reasoning with uncertain knowledge. Qualitative and quantitative specification of probability distributions using probabilistic graphical models. Algorithms for inference and probabilistic reasoning with graphical models. Statistical approaches and algorithms for learning probability models from empirical data. Applications of these models in artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Prerequisite: CSC411H1/​ STA314H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

CSC418H1 - Computer Graphics

Hours: 24L/12T

Identification and characterization of the objects manipulated in computer graphics, the operations possible on these objects, efficient algorithms to perform these operations, and interfaces to transform one type of object to another. Display devices, display data structures and procedures, graphical input, object modelling, transformations, illumination models, primary and secondary light effects; graphics packages and systems. Students, individually or in teams, implement graphical algorithms or entire graphics systems.

Prerequisite: CSC336H1/​ CSC350H1/​ CSC351H1/​ CSC373H1, ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1, MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1, CSC209H1/​proficiency in C or C++. Prerequisite for Engineering students only: ECE345H1 or ECE352H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT237Y1, MAT244H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

DRM100Y1 - Introduction to Acting and Performance

Hours: 48L/24T

An introduction to performance practice with an emphasis on the historical development and contemporary work of playwrights, actors, and directors. Key theorists, practitioners, and schools will be introduced and students will analyze them through rigorous hands-on, experiential work. This course combines weekly two-hour lectures with one-hour tutorials.

Exclusion: DRM101Y1; DRE121H5 AND DRE122H5; VPDA10H3 AND VPDA11H3; VPDA10H3 AND VPDA15H3; VPDB10H3 AND VPDB11H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM101Y1 - Introduction to Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 48L/24T

A broad introduction to the canon of Western drama, the principles of theatre history as well as key artistic movements and notions of arts criticism through a range of dramatic texts, artistic movements, and performance practices, with particular reference to the relationship between dramatic texts and their larger contexts. This course combines weekly two-hour lectures with one-hour tutorials.

Exclusion: DRM100Y1, DRE121H5, DRE122H5, VPDA10H3, VPDA11H3, VPDA10H3, VPDA15H3, VPDB10H3, VPDB11H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

DRM200Y1 - Performance I

Hours: 144P

Emphasis is initially placed on ensemble, non-verbal, and improvisational work. Students proceed to the application of their acquired skills to scripted material. Students may apply in their first or second year of University. The Application Form Deadline is March 10th for the first round of auditions; August 10th for the second round. See Audition Guidelines for information on how to apply.

Prerequisite: An audition in April or in August. Students can apply directly out of high school.
Corequisite: DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Exclusion: DRS221H5 AND DRS222H5; VPDB01H3 AND VPDB02H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM202H1 - Directing I

Hours: 24T/36P

An introduction to major concepts and artistic practices in directing, emphasizing theoretical and historical issues with supplemental practical application. The course focuses on different styles, ideas, and goals of theatre directors in their relations to actors, audiences, and broad cultural and political contexts. The Application Deadline is March 10th for the first round of interviews; August 10th for the second round. See the Guidelines for information on how to apply.

Prerequisite: An interview in April or in August with a letter of interest. Students can apply directly out of high school.
Corequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Exclusion: VPDC02H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM220Y1 - Comparative Theatre Histories

Hours: 72L

An intensive study of a range of historical and cross-cultural dramatic and performance texts and practices that contextualize theatre and performance more broadly within the social, political, and cultural parameters in which they take place. Theatre history is necessarily inextricable from world history and this course considers the many ways theatre and performance interact with the globalized world.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

DRM228H1 - Playwriting I

Hours: 36L

A hands-on study of the craft of dramatic writing. The class examines the basic elements of playwriting such as plot, structure, theme, character, dialogue, setting, with an emphasis on story-making. Attention is given to the development of students own work through written assignments and in-class exercises. The Application Deadline is March 10th for the first round; August 10th for the second round. See the Guidelines for information on how to apply.

Prerequisite: A portfolio of writing samples due on March 10th or August 10th. Students can apply directly out of high school.
Corequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Exclusion: DRE362H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM254Y1 - Production and Design I: Production

Hours: 72L/72P

A practical introduction to aspects of theatre design, with a module on theatre production. Working extensively in the Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse, the students form the core of the production team for Drama productions. The Application Deadline is March 10th for the first round; August 10th for the second round. See department website for details.

Prerequisite: An interview in April or in August. Students can apply directly out of high school. See online application for details.
Corequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Exclusion: VPDB03H3 AND VPDC03H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM286H1 - Special Topics in Drama: Introduction to Communications

Hours: 36P

Effective communication is a pivotal skill when public speaking, persuasive discourse, and personal presence are key to success. In this introductory course, students will strengthen and develop confidence in a supportive, playful, highly participatory and collaborative environment. This course is suited to students in professional programs or for those who would like to learn a full range of communication skills. Exploration of language structure, argumentation, grounding, alignment, vocal resonance, clarity and effective listening will be part of each class with an emphasis on enhancing individual potential.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM299Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rop. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission from the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM300Y1 - Performance I

Hours: 144P

Building upon the work of DRM200Y1, students concentrate on scene study, styles of acting, and the development of ensemble work with an intensive focus on voice and movement practices. The Application Deadline is March 10th.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; Minimum CGPA of 2.7 and permission of the Drama Centre. See online application for more details.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1 or any course from Group A if DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1 is complete; 1.0 FCE from DRM375H1/​ DRM376H1/​ DRM377H1/​ DRM378H1 or permission of the Centre.
Exclusion: DRS321H5 and DRS322H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM302H1 - Directing II

Hours: 36P

A continuation of DRM202H1, concentrating on major concepts and artistic practices in directing. The course focuses on different styles, ideas, and goals of theatre directors in their relations to actors, audiences, and broad cultural and political contexts. A major component will be the practical application of basic directing techniques. See Guidelines for information on how to apply and the deadline to apply.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1; DRM202H1; Minimum CGPA of 2.7 and permission of the Centre. See online application for details.
Corequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1 or any course from Group A.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM366H1 - Canadian Theatre

Hours: 36L

Since the 1960s, actors, directors, and writers have been architects of Canadian identity. This course will study the history of Canadian theatre, with an emphasis on how Canadian playwrights and creators have been engaged with social and political issues. A survey of post-colonial theatre, cultural diversity, and gender politics on the Canadian stage.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or a Canadian Studies Major/Specialist
Exclusion: DRM268H1; DRE200H5; DRE364H5; VPDB13H3
Recommended Preparation: For Drama Majors and Specialists: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

DRM368H1 - Collective Creations

Hours: 36L

A hands-on exploration of fundamental building blocks of collective creation, or ‘devised theatre,’ examining techniques and exercises by its leading practitioners. Combining research, improvisation and design elements, students define a topic of investigation and shape the resulting discoveries into a workshop presentation at the end of the course.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM375H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check Studio Topics on our website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; Minimum CGPA of 2.7. See online application for details.
Corequisite: DRM300Y1 or permission of the Centre.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM376H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check Studio Topics on our website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; Minimum CGPA of 2.7. See online application for details.
Corequisite: DRM300Y1 or permission of the Centre.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM377H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check Studio Topics on our website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; Minimum CGPA of 2.7. See online application for details.
Corequisite: DRM300Y1 or permission of the Centre.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM378H1 - Special Topics in Studio Practice

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected performance disciplines, styles, and genres within their historical and critical context. Content may vary depending on instructor. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check Studio Topics on our website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1; DRM200Y1; Minimum CGPA of 2.7. See online application for details.
Corequisite: DRM300Y1 or permission of the Centre.
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM385H1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM386H1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM387H1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

An in-depth examination of selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM388H1 - Special Topics in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in drama, theatre and performance studies. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office and check Special Topics on the website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM100Y1/​ DRM101Y1/​ UNI102Y1 or any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM391H1 - Independent Studies in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

A scholarly project at the 300 level proposed by the individual student in conversation with a member of faculty who is willing to act as supervisor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CGPA 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 10 FCE; Specialist or Major in Drama; A written proposal; Independent study form signed by both student and faculty instructor to be submitted for approval to the Associate Director (undergraduate) before registration: August 1st for September start date; November 1st for January start date.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM400Y1 - Advanced Performance: Devised Theatre

Hours: 48T/144P

An in-depth study of devising theatre in a group context. This course offers an intensive exploration of the history and practice of devised theatre within the late 20th and early 21st centuries that will culminate in a number of in-class and public performances. The Application Deadline is March 10th.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama with a minimum CGPA of 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1; and permission of the Drama Centre.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM401H1 - Advanced Concepts in Voice

Hours: 4T/48P

Advanced voice training to refine the skills and concepts developed thus far in DRM200Y1 and DRM300Y1, focusing on performance. Techniques of articulation, speech, and rhetoric are studied. Taken in conjunction with DRM403Y1: Advanced Performance: Mainstage and DRM411H1: Advanced Concepts in Movement.

Prerequisite: Minimum CGPA of 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1; acceptance into DRM403Y1 or permission of the Centre
Corequisite: DRM403Y1 and DRM411H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM402H1 - Advanced Directing

Hours: 24T/36P

An exploration of advanced directing for the theatre. The class is centered on student directed productions, which are publically presented at the end of term. Emphasis is placed on the development of strong central concepts and realizing the production with imagination, collaboration and creativity. Priority is reserved for Drama Majors and Specialists. The Application Deadline is March 10th.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama with a minimum CGPA of 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM302H1; DRM331H1; a written proposal and an interview in April.
Recommended Preparation: DRM300Y1 or DRM328H1 or DRM354Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM403Y1 - Advanced Performance: Mainstage

Hours: 48T/144P

This course, taught each year by a different visiting professional theatre director, offers upper-level theatre and performance studies students the opportunity to explore acting in a full-length production. Plays are selected to challenge students in a variety of diverse ways, exposing them to a full spectrum of theatre and performance genres and possibilities. The Application Deadline is March 10th.

Prerequisite: Specialist or Major in Drama with a minimum CGPA of 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1, 1 FCE from DRM375H1/​ DRM376H1/​ DRM377H1/​ DRM378H1; An audition in April.
Corequisite: DRM401H1, DRM411H1 (or permission of the Centre).
Exclusion: DRS425H5 AND DRS426H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM411H1 - Advanced Concepts in Movement

Hours: 2T/48P

Advanced movement training to refine the skills and concepts developed thus far in DRM200Y1 and DRM300Y1, focusing on performance. Techniques of personal physical awareness, movement as a tool for discovery in acting processes, movement as communication in performance, ensemble work, and movement generation are studied. Taken in conjunction with DRM403Y1: Advanced Performance: Mainstage and DRM401H1: Advanced Concepts in Voice.

Prerequisite: Minimum CGPA of 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM300Y1; acceptance into DRM403Y1 or permission of the Centre
Corequisite: DRM403Y1 and DRM401H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM454H1 - Advanced Production and Design

Hours: 24T/36P

Continues the exploration of design and production techniques. Students are given an opportunity to use their knowledge and skills from previous production courses on an advanced level. Students are expected to participate in Drama Centre productions in senior creative and leadership roles. Focus also includes the integration of digital technology into theatrical performance.

Prerequisite: Minimum CGPA of 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM254Y1 or DRM354Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM454Y1 - Advanced Production and Design

Hours: 144P

Continues the exploration of design and production techniques. Students are given an opportunity to use their knowledge and skills from previous production courses on an advanced level. Students are expected to participate in Drama Centre productions in senior creative and leadership roles. Focus also includes the integration of digital technology into theatrical performance. The Application Deadline is March 10th for an interview in April. 

Prerequisite: Minimum CGPA of 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; DRM254Y1 or DRM354Y1; and permission of the Drama Centre
Exclusion: DRM454H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

DRM485H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 14 FCE, Specialist or Major in Drama and/or permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM485Y1 - Senior Seminar: Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies Thesis

Hours: 72L

Research thesis, emphasizing topics and methods used in drama, theatre and performance studies. Students must obtain permission from the instructor by submitting a research project proposal. The project may engage creative practice, but the thesis itself will be a critical, written work engaging the research and dramaturgy involved in the performance or artwork. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Deadline is March 10th to apply. See online application for details.

Prerequisite: Minimum CGPA of 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 14 FCE, Specialist or Major in Drama and a research project proposal.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Society and its Institutions (3)

DRM486H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36P

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 14 FCE, Specialist or Major in Drama and/or permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM487H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 14 FCE, Specialist or Major in Drama and/or permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM488H1 - Senior Seminar in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

Hours: 36L

An in-depth examination of selected issues in the theatre at the 400 level. Special Topics vary for Breadth distribution depending on the course content and therefore may be counted towards Groups A or B. Please consult the Undergraduate Drama office or check the program’s website for more details.

Prerequisite: DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 14 FCE, Specialist or Major in Drama and/or permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM490Y1 - Independent Studies in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

A scholarly project at the 400 level proposed by the individual student in conversation with a member of faculty who is willing to act as supervisor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CGPA 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 14 FCE; Specialist or Major in Drama; A written proposal; Independent study form signed by both student and faculty instructor to be submitted for approval to the Associate Director (undergraduate) before registration: August 1st for September start date; November 1st for January start date.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

DRM491H1 - Independent Studies in Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies

A scholarly project at the 400 level proposed by the individual student in conversation with a member of faculty who is willing to act as supervisor. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CGPA 2.7; DRM220Y1/​ DRM230Y1; 14 FCE; Specialist or Major in Drama; A written proposal; Independent study form signed by both student and faculty instructor to be submitted for approval to the Associate Director (undergraduate) before registration: August 1st for September start date; November 1st for January start date.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS307H1 - Chinese Political Philosophy

Hours: 24S

The course analyses the development of Chinese political philosophy from ancient times to the present day, focusing on Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism and their relation to issues in political philosophy today.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS241H1/​ PHL237H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS309H1 - Modern Chinese Prose

Hours: 24S

A survey of representative works of prose written by 20th-century Chinese writers. This course focuses on reading texts, as well as analyzing their textual structures, aesthetic values, and historical contexts.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS311H1 - A History of Japanese Monsters

Hours: 24L

This course examines the historical development of Japanese monsters, from roughly the 7th - 8th centuries to modern times. We focus on how the changing understanding of monsters in society has embodied certain fissures in Japanese culture, especially with regard to gender and class.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS312H1 - Art and Archaeology of Early China

Hours: 36L

This course explores ancient societies from prehistory to the Bronze Age of China from archaeological perspectives with a focus on Chinese collections at the ROM. The course offers students an understanding of the origins and formation of Chinese civilizations.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1/​ ANT100Y1/​ ANT200Y1
Exclusion: EAS411H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS314H1 - Culture & World After Hiroshima & Nagasaki

Hours: 24L

Exploration of literature, film, and other cultural production related to the atomic bombing and other nuclear catastrophes from transnational, inter-Asia, and transpacific perspectives. Primarily focuses on, but not necessarily limited to, the cultural texts, intellectual concepts, and social thoughts generated out of the history of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic destruction.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS315H1 - The "Yellow Peril": Past & Present

Hours: 24L

Beginning with the Chinese Exclusion Acts, the Asian presence in North America has often been considered a serious social menace. This course explores the Asian/North American response to the past and present "Yellow Peril" constituted as a gendered, sexualized, classed, and racialized epistemological and affective structure of knowledge.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS327H1 - Japanese Fiction and the Nation

Hours: 24L/4T

Explores modern Japanese literature, with special attention given to literature's relation to the nation. Students explore how literature transforms throughout Japanese modernity and how its meaning and effects function to simultaneously solidify and fracture national identity.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and at least one course in literature
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS328H1 - Science, Technology and Society in Modern China

Hours: 24L

Learn to understand modern China from an understudied yet important perspective: the development of science and technology since the establishment of People’s Republic in 1949. Science and technology have played crucial parts in China’s political, economical, social, and cultural transformations. Drawing from anthropological, social, and historical studies of science, we examine, among other topics, science and nation-building, biopolitics, technocracy, and scientists’ self-fashioning at the junction of Communist reign and global capitalism. Students also learn key concepts of science studies.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1/​ CAS201H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS330H1 - Narrative Strategies in Modern Japanese Fiction

Hours: 24L

Discussion of narratives by modern Japanese authors with attention to issues in narratology and contemporary narrative studies such as: voice and perspective; gender and power relationships of the narrator-narratee-narrated; the act of narrating, writing, listening and reading; and metafictional paradox.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and at least one course in literature
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS334H1 - Chinese Novels

Hours: 24L

This course explores the development of Chinese fiction from earliest times with emphasis on the twentieth century.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS284Y1, EAS334Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS334Y1 - Chinese Novels

Hours: 48L

This course explores the development of Chinese fiction from earliest times with emphasis on the twentieth century.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS284H1, EAS284Y1, EAS334H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS338H1 - Classical Daoism

Hours: 48L/24P

This course examines major issues of classical Daoist thought, such as Dao and cosmos, body and self, human nature, language and knowledge, and political visions. Based on both textual and ideological analysis of Daoist works such as the Laozi, the Zhuangzi, and Huanglao Daoist texts, to be updated with recently unearthed texts in silk and bamboo slips.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and PHL237H1/​ EAS241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS340H1 - Topics in Chinese Society and Culture

Hours: 24L

This course explores issues of identity, self, and community in a broad exploration of cultural transformation in China.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS340Y1
Recommended Preparation: EAS103H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS340Y1 - Topics in Chinese Society and Culture

Hours: 48L

The course explores issues of identity, self, and community in a broad exploration of cultural transformation in China.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS340H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS103H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS345Y1 - The Rise of Greater China: Issues & Topics (formerly EAS345H1)

Hours: 48L

This course looks at China from a regional perspective, with a focus on Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the Peoples Republic of China's economic integration. The role of Chinese communities globally and in Southeast Asia also receives attention.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS345H1
Recommended Preparation: One course on modern China or East Asia or equivalent
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS346H1 - Self and Imagination in Premodern China

Hours: 24L

This course explores the diverse ways in which subjectivity was conceived in premodern China (up to the 12th century) by way of various images thinkers invoked to make sense of it. Works studied include: Warring States philosophical treatises; Buddhist and religious Daoist texts on meditation and self-cultivation; literary theory and poetry; philosophical prose essays by literati; and paintings.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS347H1 - Everyday Life in Modern Japan

Hours: 24L

The history of modern Japan as revealed by the problem of everyday life and its relationship to capitalism. Using a range of literary, philosophical, economic, and ethnographic materials that deal with the development of capitalism in Japan, Japanese colonialism, imperialism, and fascism, the course explores ways to specify and critique what is called everyday life.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS247H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS348H1 - Gift, Plunder, and Exchange: Japan and World History

Hours: 24L

This course critically re-evaluates the history and historiography of Japanese capitalism, imperialism/colonialism, and world-empire through the lens of three, distinct “modes of exchange”: gift, plunder, and commodity exchange. Inspired by Kojin Karatani’s The Structure of World History: From Modes of Production to Modes of Exchange (2014), this course explores the emancipatory politics inherent in the critical analysis of modes of exchange, and takes up historical cases from Japan, Hokkaido, Okinawa, Taiwan, Korea, China, and the “Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere.”

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1/​ EAS247H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS349H1 - Soundscapes and Modern China

Hours: 24L

An introduction to sound studies through the case of modern China. The class surveys basic theories of sound studies. It investigates the technological, cultural, and social production of soundscapes in modern China. Topics include the invention of national language(s), the introduction of gramophone, radio, and sound cinema, and the relationship between sound, aesthetics, and power.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS357H1 - Mao's China and Beyond

Hours: 24L

This course introduces major issues and events in contemporary Chinese history from the success of the Communist revolution in 1949 to China's postsocialist transitions in the 1980s and early 1990s. Topics include the development and victory of the Chinese Communist revolution, the rule and legacy of Mao Zedong (particularly the Hundred Flowers movement, the Great Leap Forward, and the Cultural Revolution), and economic reform and political repression in the era of Deng Xiaoping.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS358Y1 - Classical Chinese I

Hours: 48S

An introduction to the Classical Chinese language with emphasis on grammatical analysis and translation into English. Open only to EAS majors and specialists.

Prerequisite: EAS103H1, EAS100Y1/​ EAS101Y1
Recommended Preparation: Two or more years of Modern Standard Chinese
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS361H1 - Zen Buddhism

Hours: 24L

This course introduces the Zen Buddhist traditions of China, Korea, and Japan. Emphasis is placed on the radical views of history, language, ritual, self, and enlightenment espoused by these traditions. The course also examines issues related to Zen monasticism, the development of koans, and the definition of orthodoxy in both premodern and modern Zen. Students will be asked to explore these and other topics by paying close attention to the historical, doctrinal, and institutional contexts from which they arose.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS364H1 - China's Cultural Revolution: History and Memory

Hours: 24L

No understanding of contemporary China is possible without understanding the ramifications of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). This course considers this tumultuous episode as a field of historical research and conceptual inquiry. This course critically examines a wide variety of sources, including scholarly accounts, official documents, personal memoirs, oral histories, and literary works.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS366H1 - Lovers and Madmen in Chinese Literature

Hours: 24L

A thematic introduction to some of China's major literary texts by taking as our guide the lover and the madman as both writer and subject. We use the idea of lover and madman to explore issues such as social and behavioral boundaries, desire, violence, narrative compulsion, and the re-imagination of tradition.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS372H1 - The Postwar, Cold War and Divided Koreas

Hours: 24L

This research-oriented course examines the divided history of the Korean peninsula since 1945 in the context of the global war. Examines key debates in the history of contemporary Korea, beginning with the Korean war and ending with the contemporary culture of division.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Exclusion: EAS372Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS372Y1 - The Postwar, Cold War and Divided Koreas

Hours: 48L

This research-oriented course examines the divided history of the Korean peninsula since 1945 in the context of the global war. Examines key debates in the history of contemporary Korea, beginning with the Korean war and ending with the contemporary culture of division.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Exclusion: EAS372H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS374H1 - Modern Japan and Colonialism

Hours: 24L

This course interrogates the history of modern Japan from the perspective of Japan's colonial exploits in East Asia. The course also addresses the political economy and culture of the military occupation of Japan by the Supreme Command of the Allied Powers. Texts from economics, philosophy, and literature will be used.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS375H1 - Postwar Japan: Crisis, Apocalypse

Hours: 24L

This course explores the history of the postwar period in Japan and its former colonies in order to delineate a way to think of the idea of apocalypse in relation to crisis in advanced capitalism. Through an examination of the history of capitalist crisis in postwar Japan, the course investigates themes of apocalypse in atomic-bomb literature, television, Godzilla, radical students movements, ecological-industrial disasters, worker art movements, debates on modernity and fascism, avant-garde theatre, popular music, religious movements, nationalism, populism, and the so-called “ageing population” problem. The course revolves around texts by philosophers, economists, novelists, essayists, artists, and critics, as well as film and audio recordings.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Exclusion: EAS347H1, EAS374H1
Recommended Preparation: EAS247H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS378H1 - Edo, Osaka, and Kyoto: Urban Life in Early Modern Japan

Hours: 24L

An exploration of most important cities of Tokugawa Japan, which were among the largest of the early modern world, and home to vibrant urban culture and economic activity. The texts include buildings, maps, paintings, prints, film and novels.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS386H1 - Culture of Nature in China

Hours: 24L

The course examines the cultural practice of nature in China’s past and present, focusing on literary, artistic, spiritual, ethical, political, and scientific aspects of human-nature relation. Through scholarly works and primary sources, the course inquires into the cultural politics of human-nature entanglements.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Exclusion: EAS386Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS388H1 - Asian/North American Feminist Issues

Hours: 24L

A transpacific examination of gender and sexuality issues that have directly and indirectly affected Asians and Asian North Americans. Considers, for example, the gender and sexual representations of Asia in North America, the psycho-history of the “Yellow Peril” and its ramifications beyond Asian North Americans, and the history of immigration, nationalism, colonialism, war, and the militarized empire.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS393H1 - Topics in Buddhism

Hours: 24L

Topics vary according to the instructor’s interests.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS393Y1 - Topics in Buddhism

Hours: 48L

Topics vary according to the instructor’s interests.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS394H1 - Film Culture in Contemporary China

Hours: 36L

This course discusses documentary film and DV culture in contemporary China as forms of cultural, communal, and political practices. We focus on films and videos that seek to address important global issues such as peace, environment, and climate change in cross-media approach and in personal tone. We ask: What new tendencies are there in the films and videos? Where can we trace them back to? What fresh possibilities do they bring forth to our aesthetic and public life?

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS395Y0 - Selected Topics in East Asian Studies

This course allows students to pursue the specialized study of topics tailored to the research and study opportunities available in Hong Kong and the expertise and interests of the instructor. Available only in the Woodsworth College Hong Kong Summer Program.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS396H1 - Topics in East Asian Studies

Hours: 24L

An in-depth study of Chinese, Japanese or Korean culture, history and/or literature. Content depends on the instructor. See EAS website for details. When offered, the course will have a subtitle that describes its content.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS397H1 - Literary Lives in Late Imperial China

Hours: 24L

In-depth examination of five to six selected men and women through close reading of their literary repertoire and through biography and autobiography. The material will introduce concepts such as memory, literati identity, aesthetic theories, gender, and social transformations in the Ming and Qing period.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS398H0 - Research Excursions

An instructor-supervised group project in an off-campus setting. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/399. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS399Y0 - Research Excursions

An instructor-supervised group project in an off-campus setting. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rep. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

EAS407H1 - Textual Analysis of Classical Chinese Philosophy

Hours: 24S

Readings from ancient and medieval Chinese philosophy. Beginning with linguistic (especially semantic) analysis of key words, structure and meaning of sentences, paragraphs, and texts as a whole, which forms the basis for philosophical examination.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and PHL237H1/​ EAS241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS408H1 - Modern Taiwanese Literature

Hours: 24S

A general survey of modern Taiwanese literature from 1949 to the present. It examines issues central to understanding the Taiwanese literary culture, such as historical/cultural context, oral/written language, self-identification, gender, and human rights.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and 2.0 FCEs in literature
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS409H1 - Cities in Premodern China

Hours: 24S

Focusing on selected Chinese cities from the earliest history to 1800 CE, this course introduces students to different aspects of urban life and its representations in literature and history.

Prerequisite: EAS103H1, EAS209H1
Exclusion: EAS367H1
Recommended Preparation: Some familiarity with Chinese history in the middle period
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS412H1 - Technology and Material Cultures of Ancient China

Hours: 24P

This course introduces the technology and material culture of prehistoric and Bronze-Age China. Offers students an understanding of the development of ancient technologies (e.g. bronze, jade, and lacquer) and associated ways of life from archaeological perspectives.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS312H1/​ EAS411H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS414H1 - Bodily/Mental Health in Chinese Philosophy

Hours: 24S

Textual and conceptual analysis of theories and practices related to physical health and mental sanity in Chinese philosophical schools such as Confucianism, Daoism, and Chinese Mahayana Buddhism.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS241H1/​ PHL237H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS417H1 - Korean Literary Translation Workshop

Hours: 24L

A workshop format is used to explore problems encountered when translating Korean literary texts (fiction and poetry) into English. Practice with a variety of texts is accompanied by readings in translation theory to refine our understanding of translation and enrich our experience working with historical forms of Korean and English.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 anad EAS310Y1 or its equivalent
Recommended Preparation: EAS410Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS419H1 - Chinese Cultural Studies Seminar: May Fourth

Hours: 24L

This seminar focuses on the May Fourth Movement in early twentieth century China. Taking May Fourth as a case study and a vantage point, this class enables a critical understanding of various aspects of the cultural and intellectual life in the early Republican period.

Prerequisite: EAS105H1 and EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS431H1 - Advanced Topics in Japanese Cinema

Hours: 24S

The focus ranges from the examination of cross-cultural theoretical problems (such as Orientalism) to a director-based focus, from the examination of genre (such as documentary or the category of genre itself) to the way film intersects with other cultural forms and technologies (such as video and new media).

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS242H1/​ EAS243H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS432H1 - Korean Cultural Studies Seminar

Hours: 24S

This seminar provides an opportunity for in-depth reading and research into a specific topic in the cultural and intellectual history of Korea. Topics will vary each semester but may include colonial period print culture, the New Woman, the history of photography, and modernism.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS455H1 - Classical Confucianism

Hours: 24S

This course explores the historical and systematic aspects of classical Confucianism, which is fundamental for understanding Chinese philosophy and culture. The historical part discusses the development of the Confucian doctrine from Confucius to his generations of disciples. The systematic part engages issues such as emotion, art, poetry, morality and virtues, political philosophy, and knowledge and reality.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS241H1/​ PHL237H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EAS457H1 - Special Topics in Modern Japanese History

Hours: 24S

An analysis of contemporary monographs on modern Japanese history. This course offers a critical survey of existing methodologies of and approaches to writing about modern Japan.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS247H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS458H1 - Classical Chinese II (formerly EAS306Y1)

Hours: 24S

As a continuation of EAS358Y1 (formerly EAS206Y1), this course helps students to gain in-depth control of grammatical structures of classical Chinese and to read texts with greater ease. Requirements include a major research/translation project. Open only to EAS majors and specialists.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS358Y1 (minimum 79%)
Exclusion: EAS306Y1, EAS335Y1
Recommended Preparation: three or more years of Modern Standard Chinese, EAS358Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

EAS459Y1 - Rethinking the Cold War in East Asia

Hours: 48S

This research course examines the ways our historical understanding of the Cold War in East Asia has shifted over the last twenty years. Focusing primarily on the divided Korean peninsula where it can be said the Cold War still rages, the course examines the mutual constitution of two competing regional political economies rooted in a shared commitment to developmentalism.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS271H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS471H1 - Issues in the Political Economy of South Korea

Hours: 24S

A course designed to guide students toward a research paper on a selected topic of interest on the postwar political economy of South Korea.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS271H1
Exclusion: EAS471Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS473H1 - Modern Korean History Seminar

Hours: 24S

An examination of recent literature in the modern Korean history field, focusing especially on the late 19th and 20th centuries.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1 and EAS271H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EAS497H1 - Beyond Orientalism

Hours: 24S

This course confronts the Orientalist view of the world by looking at one Asian nation regularly exempted from that paradigm: Japan. By examining, among other topics, Japan's emperor system, its construction of a national history, and its own imperialism, this course hopes to point toward alternative ways of thinking about East and West.

Prerequisite: EAS209H1
Recommended Preparation: Five EAS half courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

ECO101H1 - Principles of Microeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to economic analysis and its applications: price determination, market structure, decision making by individuals and firms, public policy. NOTE: extensive use of graphical and quantitative analysis.

Exclusion: ECO100Y1, ECO105Y1, ECO100Y5, MGEA01H3, MGEA02H3
Recommended Preparation: MCV4U (Calculus & Vectors) and MHF4U (Advanced Functions), or equivalent secondary school mathematics credits
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO102H1 - Principles of Macroeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to economic analysis and its applications from a macroeconomic (economy-wide) perspective. Topics covered include international trade and finance, role of money and the banking system, monetary and fiscal policy. Note: graphical and quantitative analysis are used extensively.

Prerequisite: ECO101H1
Exclusion: ECO100Y1, ECO105Y1, ECO100Y5, MGEA05H3, MGEA06H3
Recommended Preparation: MCV4U (Calculus & Vectors) and MHF4U (Advanced Functions), or equivalent secondary school mathematics credits
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO220Y1 - Quantitative Methods in Economics

Hours: 48L/48T

Numerical and graphical data description; data collection and sampling; probability; sampling distributions; statistical inference; hypothesis testing and estimation; simple and multiple regression analysis (extensive coverage). Learn how to analyze data and how to correctly interpret and explain results.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(67%)/( ECO101H1(63%), ECO102H1(63%))/ ECO105Y1(80%); MAT133Y1/​( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
Exclusion: GGR270H1, PSY201H1, PSY202H1, SOC300H1, STA220H1, STA221H1, STA247H1, STA248H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3); The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ECO227Y1 - Quantitative Methods in Economics

Hours: 48L/24T

A rigorous introduction to probability and mathematical statistics intended for economics specialists. Probability and estimation theory, sampling distributions, hypotheses testing, multiple regression analysis. Students will learn the tools used in economics and finance to model and address randomness and uncertainty.

Prerequisite: ECO100Y1(70%)/( ECO101H1(70%), ECO102H1(70%)); MAT133Y1(63%)/( MAT135H1(60%), MAT136H1(60%))/ MAT137Y1(55%)/ MAT157Y1(55%)
Corequisite: Recommended: MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1, MAT235Y1/​ MAT237Y1/​ ECO210H1
Exclusion: GGR270H1, PSY201H1, SOC300H1, STA247H1, STA248H1, STA255H1, STA257H1, STA261H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ECO305H1 - Economics of Accounting

Hours: 24L/12T

The economic impact of accounting rules and practices for firms and financial contracts. Topics include economic models of agency, economics of optimal accounting rules such as government regulation of corporate disclosure and the economic returns to financial reporting. No previous knowledge of accounting is required; the basic language of financial accounting will be covered.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: Not open to students enrolled in Rotman Commerce programs.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO306H1 - American Economic History

Hours: 24L/12T

A survey of American economic history from the ante-bellum period to the present. Potential topics include the rapid growth of the American economy in the late 19th and early 20th century; causes of the onset of the Great Depression; the economic impact of slavery and its aftermath; health and demographic trends; and 20th century trends in inequality.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO310H1 - Empirical Industrial Organization

Hours: 24L/12T

The quantitative analysis of firms' strategies in real-world industries, using tools from applied microeconomics and statistics. Topics include studies of monopoly, oligopoly, imperfect competition, and the estimation of demand and cost functions that underpin these markets.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO310Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO313H1 - Environmental Economics and Policies

Hours: 24L/12T

This course demonstrates how a rigorous application of microeconomic techniques can inform our responses to various environmental problems. Topics may include: air and water pollution and renewable resource management.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO324H1 - Economic Development

Hours: 24L/12T

This course critically analyzes issues related to economic development and the associated policy responses. Tools from micro and macroeconomic theory are employed, as well as the critical assessment of empirical evidence. Topics may include education, health, credit markets, inequality, and the role of foreign aid.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO324Y1, ECO324Y5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO325H1 - Advanced Economic Theory - Macro

Hours: 24L/12T

A development of the microeconomic foundations of macroeconomic theory to expand students analytic skills by constructing and solving macroeconomic models. Topics may include: dynamic choice, neoclassical growth theory, uncertainty and rational expectations, business cycles, as well as fiscal and monetary policy.

Prerequisite: ECO208Y1/​ ECO202Y1(70%)/ ECO209Y1, ECO220Y1(70%)/ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1(70%), STA238H1(70%))/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Recommended Preparation: MAT235Y1/​ MAT237Y1/​ ECO210H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO326H1 - Advanced Microeconomics - Game Theory

Hours: 24L/12T

Game theory and applications. Topics include: strategic and extensive games, with applications to economics.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1(70%)/ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1(70%)/ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1(70%), STA238H1(70%))/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO316H1, ECO326H5
Recommended Preparation: MAT235Y1/​ MAT237Y1/​ ECO210H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO331H1 - Behavioural and Experimental Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Ample empirical and experimental evidence suggests significant departures from classical assumptions of economic behaviour. For example, humans are neither always perfectly rational nor always self interested. This course describes systematic ways in which behaviour deviates from neoclassical assumptions, generating new, and hopefully more realistic behavioural assumptions that have broad empirical, theoretical and policy implications.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO332H1 - Economics of the Family

Hours: 24L/24T

A use of microeconomics to study the behaviour of the family, including marriage, divorce, intra-family allocations, investment in children and gender roles.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO334H1 - The Political Economy of Media

Hours: 24L/12T

Tools are developed to analyze voters and the role of information in democracies. Theories of voter information are evaluated using empirical literature on media and the political economy of media. The effects of innovations in information technology are explored and we will evaluate how the empirical results square with the theory. A study of newspapers, radio, television, cable, the Internet and social media, with a focus on empirical methods used to identify effects of media on voters.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO336H1 - Public Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Theory of taxation and public goods, and quantitative methods for program evaluation. Additional topics include taxation and income distribution; environmental policy; and the political economy of government policy.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO336Y1, ECO337H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO337H1 - Public Economics (for Commerce)

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to the economics of government similar to ECO336H1, but with greater focus on issues in business and financial economics. Additional topics include business tax planning and corporate financial policy; taxation of saving and risk-taking; and government business enterprises.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO336Y1, ECO336H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO338H1 - Economics of Careers

Hours: 24L/12T

The economic analysis of careers from the perspectives of both workers and employers: How do people decide what to study, what careers to pursue, and when to change jobs? How do these decisions interact with the structure of firms? The impact of specialization and the division of labor on the evolution of careers is considered, as are the role of cognitive and communication skills in the labor market.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO339H1 - Labour Economics: Employment, Wages and Public Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

Using tools from microeconomic theory and statistics, this course introduces students to the study of labour markets, focusing on employment and wage determination, and the application of labour economics to public policy. Topics may include: Labour supply, labour demand, estimating the impact of welfare programs, minimum wages, and other labour market interventions.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO239Y1, ECO339Y1, ECO343Y5, ECO344Y5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO340H1 - Labour Economics: The Distribution of Earnings

Hours: 24L/12T

Using tools from microeconomic theory and statistics, this course studies the determinants of wages across labour markets. Topics include the theory of compensating differentials, human capital, discrimination, immigration, unions, and alternative models of compensation. In addition, students are introduced to microeconomic models of unemployment. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on the evaluation of empirical evidence.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO239Y1, ECO339Y1, ECO343Y5, ECO344Y5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO349H1 - Money, Banking and Financial Markets

Hours: 24L/12T

This course studies the interaction of the monetary and banking sectors with financial markets and the broader economy. It builds especially on tools developed in intermediate macroeconomics, but also focuses on the institutional structure of the Canadian monetary sector, including the role and operation of the Bank of Canada.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO349H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO358H1 - Financial Economics I

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to economics of financial assets and financial markets. Topics: inter-temporal choice, expected utility theory, security valuation, selected asset pricing models, market efficiency, and the term structure of interest rates - essential materials for an understanding of the role and operation of financial markets.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ACT349H1, RSM332H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO362H1 - Economic Growth

Hours: 24L/12T

The course considers a broad range of issues that underlie economic growth, including technical progress and the accumulation of human and physical capital. Beyond these factors, the course also investigates the efficiency with which capital is used, the role of foreign trade, and the possible roles of institutions and geography.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO352H1, ECO360Y1, ECO362H5
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO364H1 - International Trade Theory

Hours: 24L/12T

An examination of the causes and consequences of international trade. The first half develops traditional models of comparative advantage, with the second half examines more recent theoretical and empirical work on trade & wages, the political economy of trade, outsourcing, and firm heterogeneity.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO230Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO368H1 - Economics of Conflict

Hours: 24L/12T

This course explores the links between violent conflict and socioeconomic development. It focuses on micro-level processes leading to conflict, and how conflict and political violence affect people's lives at the household and community levels. It also examines how these processes are linked to wider political and economic issues including governance and the role of institutions. Tools from economic theory are applied alongside country-specific and cross-country empirical evidence.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1) Note: Students with ECO100Y1(67%)/( ECO101H1(63%), ECO102H1(63%))/ ECO105Y1(80%), plus a full-year of quantitative methods/statistics (e.g., POL242Y1), and who are enrolled in the International Relations or Peace, Conflict and Justice Major or Specialist programs may take this course with Permission of the Instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO369H1 - Health Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

The provision of health care provides many special problems of informational asymmetry, regulation, insurance and redistribution. A consideration of the demand and supply side problems. Alternative reform proposals for health care are explored.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO369Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO372H1 - Applied Regression Analysis and Empirical Papers

Hours: 24L/12T

How multiple regression can be used to answer causal questions. Implications of, and how to interpret different model specifications and identification strategies. Students will read, critically evaluate and replicate existing research, and conduct their own original analyses. Statistical software STATA or R will be used.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO351H1 (2016-2017)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO374H1 - Forecasting and Time Series Econometrics

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to econometrics similar to ECO375H1, with greater focus on applications drawn from business and financial economics. The course is built around the statistical foundations and economic applications of the multiple regression model. Using statistical software, students will also learn how to conduct, present, and critique empirical research.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1(70%)/ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1(70%), STA238H1(70%))/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Recommended Preparation: MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO375H1 - Applied Econometrics I

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to econometrics. Statistical foundations and the interpretation of multiple regression models, with an emphasis on cross-sectional data. Application of regressions to a wide variety of economic questions and data sources, including the use of statistical software. Problems in the identification of causality, and an introduction to methods of addressing common statistical issues

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1(70%)/( STA237H1(70%), STA238H1(70%))/ ECO227Y1/​( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO327Y5, ECO375H5
Recommended Preparation: MAT221H1/​ MAT223H1/​ MAT240H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO380H1 - Markets, Competition, and Strategy

Hours: 24L/12T

This course in applied microeconomics is concerned with the functioning of markets and the behaviour of firms within these markets. The focus is on strategic relationships between organizations, including competitive relationships among firms in the same market and cooperative relationships between a firm and its suppliers and distributors.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO381H1 - Personnel Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

An examination of selected material on compensation and incentives in organizations. Topics include recruitment and hiring, training, turnover, downsizing, motivating workers, teams, allocating authority and task assignment.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Exclusion: ECO370Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO401H1 - Topics in Economic Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

This course covers basic issues in the theoretical and empirical evaluation of public policy. Sample topics include income redistribution through taxation and the provision of social insurance and public goods, the mitigation of externalities, and welfare analysis in behavioral models.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO402H1 - Topics in Health Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

This course explores a variety of topics in health economics, providing students with an overview of current and historical institutional characteristics of the market for, and public policy towards, health care. Students will apply theoretical and empirical tools to current domestic and international issues in health policy. No previous background in health economics is required.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO403H1 - Topics in Development Economics and Policy

Hours: 24L/12T

This course covers a variety of topics pertaining to economic development and associated policies. Depending on the course instructor, the focus may be on theories and policies related to poverty alleviation, human capital formation, financial markets, international trade, governance or economic growth.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO404H1 - Topics in Managerial Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Applies quantitative economic methods to real world business-oriented cases. Sample topics include: New product design, Decision making under uncertainty, Market segmentation and price discrimination, Inventory analysis, Game theoretic analysis of price wars, Financial portfolio design, and optimal pricing. Involves substantial modeling in Excel, regression analysis, optimization methods, and financial reports.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1(75%)/ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); ECO372H1/​ ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1; at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO406H1 - Developmental Macroeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

This course studies a growth model applicable to both middle-income developing countries and resource-rich developed countries. Special attention is paid to causes of cyclical currency overvaluation, particularly Dutch disease and excessive capital inflows.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO407H1 - Competing Views in Macroeconomic Theory and Policy

Hours: 24L/24T

Provides students with a systematic analysis of competing perspectives on key areas of macroeconomic theory and policy. Special attention paid to competing views regarding key fiscal, monetary, and trade policy issues as applied to Canada.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO408H1 - The Economics of Life: A Historical Perspective

Hours: 24L/12T

Demographic economic history within a North American context. Topics include changes over time in marriage markets, fertility, mortality and stature. The impact of property rights within marriage, illegitimacy, the decline of fertility in the nineteenth century and the puzzling inter-temporal divergence between height and wealth during the early nineteenth century.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Exclusion: ECO308H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO409H1 - Topics in Money, Banking, and Finance

Hours: 24L/12T

This course examines the foundations of money and financial institutions using tools mastered in micro and macroeconomics. The goal is a set of principles valid for the analysis of monetary policy and institutional regulation in a variety of real world settings.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO410H1 - Mergers and Competition Policy

Hours: 24L/24T

A combined theoretical, empirical and policy approach to mergers amongst competitors (horizontal mergers). Uses microeconomic models including game theory and econometrics. Delves into recent/current matters assessed by antitrust authorities domestically and/or internationally with applications to specific industries.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1), at least 1.0 ECO FCE at the 300+ level or higher
Exclusion: ECO310Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO414H1 - Energy and Regulation

Hours: 24L/12T

This course provides a general treatment of the economics of energy markets and the use of regulation in addressing environmental and other issues arising in these markets. A central theme is the search for an appropriate balance between market forces and regulatory/government intervention. Familiarity with tools of microeconomics and statistics/econometrics is essential. Topics include oil, natural gas, coal and electricity markets, global warming and other externalities, networks, feed-in-tariffs, carbon taxes, ‘cap-and-trade’ and incentive regulation.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1) or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO417H1 - Economic Development Policy: Community Engaged Learning

Hours: 12L/12T/12P

An examination of the causes and consequence of poverty in developing countries with a microeconomic focus, and how it relates it to poverty in the developed world, using a 30-hour service placement at a community organization. Importance of community and context specific factors in policy implementation; learn how local organizations have responded. Use of reflection assignments, papers, group work and class discussions to relate to course concepts. Topics include poverty traps, health, education, and credit. An application to the instructor is necessary. Not available for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO419H1 - International Macroeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

Contemporary issues in international monetary economics and macroeconomic policy formulation in open economies like Canada. A study of forces determining interest rates and exchange rates, inflation and unemployment; analysis of government policy in relation to financial markets.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1) permission of instructor
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO423H1 - Economics and Biosocial Data

Hours: 24L/12T

This course introduces and critically assesses economic research that uses genetic, neuroscientific, and other biosocial data. We will address questions such as: What are the effects of brain neurochemistry on economic decision-making? What role do nature and nurture play in economic behaviour and outcomes? What can we learn from genoeconomics? What are the policy implications (or lack thereof) of related findings? No previous background in biology or genetics is required.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least 1.0 ECO FCE at the 300+ level; or permission of the instructor.
Exclusion: ECO422H1S (winter 2017)
Recommended Preparation: ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO425H1 - Business Cycles

Hours: 24L/12T

This course builds on material covered in ECO208Y1. Students will learn how to use business cycle models to better understand key empirical features of the macroeconomy. Topics covered include the financial crisis, monetary policy, fiscal policy, theories of unemployment, and the effects of innovation on economic fluctuations, the Great Depression and the Financial Crisis.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1, ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1, ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1), at least 1.0 ECO FCE at the 300+ level
Corequisite: ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO426H1 - Market Design

Hours: 24L/12T

This course presents the theory and practice of market design, including matching markets and auctions. Sample topics include school choice, kidney exchange, spectrum auctions, and keyword auctions.

Prerequisite: ECO316H1(70%)/ ECO326H1(60%)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO435H1 - The Economics of Modern China

Hours: 24L/12T

A focus on post-1949 Chinese economy, and the PRCs economic legacy. Economic development during the Maoist period, particularly post-1979 reforms. China's experience is compared to Eastern Europe's and the role of China in the rapidly growing East Asian economy. This is a limited enrolment seminar requiring extensive reading.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1(70%)/ ECO204Y1(70%)/ ECO206Y1(70%); ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO446H1 - Advanced Public Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

Advanced topics in public economics and economic analysis of Canadian public policy. Through a mix of lectures and independent research, students will acquire theoretical and empirical tools for public policy analysis. Topics may include: income inequality and redistribution; fiscal federalism; taxation of corporate profits; and policies to deal with public goods and externalities.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); at least one FCE in ECO at the 300 level or higher.
Exclusion: ECO336Y1
Recommended Preparation: ECO372H1/​ ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1 (familiarity with STATA)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO462H1 - Financial Econometrics

Hours: 24L/12T

This course is intended primarily for students in the Financial Economics specialist program. An introduction to the econometrics used in empirical finance, with an emphasis on estimation and inference using computer based applications. Topics will include parametric and nonparametric models of volatility, evaluation of asset pricing theories and models for risk management and transactions data.

Prerequisite: ECO358H1(70%), ECO375H1(70%)/ ECO375H5(70%)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO463H1 - Financial Market Innovation

Hours: 24L/12T

A research-oriented course that explores the impact of technological developments on the industrial organization of financial markets. Topics include the impact of the automated financial products and procedures (e.g., algorithmic trading and robo-advising) on the price formation process, the economic impact of new tools and technologies (e.g., blockchain, digital currencies, and predictive analytics such as machine learning), the emergence of alternative financing methods such as crowdfunding and peer-to-peer lending.

 

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1(70%)/ ECO204Y1(60%)/ ECO206Y1(60%), ( ECO374H1(70%)/ ECO375H1(70%))/ CSC321H1/​ CSC411H1
Exclusion: ECO463H5
Recommended Preparation: ECO358H1/​ RSM330H1/​ RSM332H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO464H1 - Empirical Financial Economics

Hours: 24L/12T

The course develops the tools used in empirical research in financial economics. Coverage may include discrete choice models, duration models, instrumental variables, differences-in-differences, regression discontinuity, propensity score estimators, sample selection models and cumulative abnormal return calculation. Topics are drawn from ownership structure, mergers and acquisitions, capital structure, payout policy, CEOs’ effect on the firm, executive compensation, insider trading, shareholder activism, and bank financing.

Prerequisite: ECO358H1(70%)/ RSM330H1(70%), ECO374H1(70%)/ ECO375H1(70%)/ ECO375H5(70%)/ ECO327Y5(70%)
Recommended Preparation: ECO359H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ECO499H1 - Honours Essay in Applied Microeconomics

Hours: 24L/12T

Students will complete an original research paper on a topic of their choosing. Topic must be microeconomic and applied, meaning all papers will involve data and quantitative (regression) analysis.

Prerequisite: ECO200Y1/​ ECO204Y1/​ ECO206Y1; ECO202Y1/​ ECO208Y1/​ ECO209Y1; ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​( STA237H1, STA238H1)/( STA257H1, STA261H1); ECO372H1/​ ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1; 3.0 GPA in economics courses; approval of the Associate Chair, Undergraduate
Recommended Preparation: ECO374H1/​ ECO375H1 and ECO372H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

EEB214H1 - Evolution and Adaptation

Hours: 24L/12T

Evolution and adaptation of life on Earth. Introduction to the theory of evolution by natural selection. Topics may include: evidence supporting the fact of evolution, and how evolutionary theory can help explain the world around us, such as how species are formed, and the evolution of sex, infanticide, and disease. For non-science students in all years and disciplines.

Exclusion: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB215H1 - Conservation Biology

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to the scientific discipline that deals with threatened species and habitats. Topics include: biodiversity, extinction, threats, demography, genetic diversity, protecting, managing and restoring ecosystems (e.g., nature reserves, captive breeding, conservation corridors), sustainable development, and global warming. Ties between the study of conservation biology and environmental law, economics, and policy will also be covered. For non-science students in all years and disciplines.

Exclusion: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB255H1 - Essentials of Biodiversity Science and Conservation Biology

Hours: 36L

“Classical” and “new” concepts in biodiversity and conservation. Topics may include: evolution and ecology in the past (Holocene) and future (Anthropocene); levels and kinds of biodiversity; valuing biodiversity through ecological economics; causes of endangerment; predicting extinction; genetic and demographic theory; habitat protection and captive breeding; conservation policies and endangered species acts; designing future biodiversity.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB263H1 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Hours: 24L/36P

The ontogeny and phylogeny of vertebrate structure are considered within the context of evolutionary theory. Functional aspects of the various organ systems are examined. Representative vertebrates are analyzed (with brief dissection of some forms) in laboratory to illustrate selected anatomical features and to provide practical exposure to vertebrate construction. (Lab Materials Fee: $25)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB266H1 - Animal Diversity: Invertebrates

Hours: 24L/18P

The diversity of invertebrates (e.g. sponges, jellyfish, flatworms, molluscs, segmented worms, round worms, arthropods, echinoderms and several smaller phyla) is explored, focusing on taxonomic characters that define each group and their placement in the evolutionary tree of life, ecological function, biological requirements, and geographical distribution. Labs emphasize identification and recognition of major groups, including dissection when appropriate. (Lab Materials Fee: $25)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB267H1 - Animal Diversity: Vertebrates

Hours: 24L/18P

Introduction to the diversity of chordate animals (vertebrates, tunicates, and lancelets), focusing on morphological, physiological, ecological and behavioural traits that make each group special and how those traits increase vulnerability to human-based exploitation. Labs involve living organisms whenever possible, but only for display purposes.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB319H1 - Population Ecology

Hours: 24L/36P

Abundance and distribution of populations; population growth and regulation; fluctuations, stochasticity and chaos; meta-population persistence and extinction; age and stage-structured populations; interactions within and between species; optimal harvesting; spread of infectious diseases. Labs include experiments and computer simulations. (Lab materials fee: $25)

Prerequisite: BIO220H1; ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1; and a course in statistics from EEB225H1 (recommended), PSY201H1, STA220H1/​ STA250H1/​ STA257H1, STA288H1/​ GGR270H1, HMB325H1
Recommended Preparation: ENV234H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB323H1 - Evolutionary Genetics

Hours: 36L/12T

Evolutionary biology rests on a foundation of evolutionary genetics. This course focuses on the core ideas in population genetics and extends to evolutionary genomics. Students are exposed to the mathematical theory underlying evolutionary genetics and will learn the mathematical foundations underlying these ideas. Topics include the population genetics of mutation, migration, drift, and selection, analysis of sequence variation, and the evolution of sexual reproduction.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Recommended Preparation: ( MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB362H1 - Macroevolution

Hours: 24L/12T

Explores patterns and processes of large-scale evolutionary change, played out over large geographic expanses and extended periods of time. Integrates information from paleontology, phylogenetics, field studies, functional biology, and experiments to link emergent evolutionary patterns to underlying evolutionary processes. Topics include: speciation, phylogenetic inference, adaptive vs. non-adaptive evolution, evolutionary constraints, diversification and extinction, evolutionary innovations, historical biogeography, and the relationship between evolutionary history and ecology. Tutorials will illustrate common analytical approaches to macroevolutionary investigation and provide in-depth exploration of landmark studies in macroevolution.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB430H1 - Modeling in Ecology and Evolution

Hours: 24L/12P

Study of ecology and evolution uses models to explain biological phenomena including the maintenance of biodiversity, population growth, competition, eco-evolutionary dynamics, trait and molecular evolution, epidemiology, spatial ecology, phylogeny and extinction. Students will learn to develop, assess and apply analytical, simulation and statistical models for analysis and data interpretation.

Prerequisite: BIO220H1, EEB225H1, MAT136H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT223H1, and at least one of EEB319H1/​ EEB321H1/​ EEB322H1/​ EEB323H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB466H1 - Approaches to the Study of Biodiversity

Hours: 24L/24P

This course uses the collections, research, and public gallery areas of the Royal Ontario Museum to expose students to the ways in which biodiversity is discovered, analyzed, and interpreted in a museum setting. Topics include: morphological and molecular approaches, taxonomy, classification, bioinformatics and e-taxonomy, and the interpretation of biodiversity for the public. Labs include student projects and a one-day field trip on a weekend (cost about $15).

Prerequisite: BIO220H1; EEB266H1/​ EEB267H1/​ EEB268H1/​ EEB330H1/​ EEB331H1/​ EEB365H1/​ EEB380H1/​ EEB382H1/​ EEB384H1/​ EEB386H1/​ EEB388H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

EEB495H1 - Seminar in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Hours: 24S

Seminar course in ecology and evolutionary biology, emphasizing critical thinking and the synthesis of ideas crossing disciplinary boundaries. Group discussions among peers, facilitated by faculty, and student presentations. Discussions include critical analysis of research and review articles in the primary literature. Evaluation based on presentations, participation in class discussions, and written assignments. (Note students may take this course only once.)

Prerequisite: A minimum of 1.0 FCE in EEB courses at the 300+ level (at least 0.5 FCE in ecology and 0.5 FCE in evolutionary biology is highly recommended)
Exclusion: EEB496H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENG100H1 - Effective Writing

Hours: 36L

Practical tools for writing in university and beyond. Students will gain experience in generating ideas, clarifying insights, structuring arguments, composing paragraphs and sentences, critiquing and revising their writing, and communicating effectively to diverse audiences. This course may not be counted toward any English program.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

ENG150Y1 - Literary Traditions

Hours: 48L/24T

An introduction to major authors, ideas, and texts that shaped and continue to inform the ever-evolving traditions of literature in English. Includes works and authors from antiquity to the nineteenth century such as the Bible, the Qur'an, Plato, Homer, Sappho, Virgil, Dante, Christine de Pizan, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Montaigne, Austen, Dostoevski.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG210Y0 - The Novel

An introduction to the novel through a reading of texts representing a range of periods, techniques, regions, and themes. Offered by the Summer Abroad program.

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE, or any 4.0 FCE. Exclusion: ENG210H1

ENG220Y0 - Shakespeare

Hours: 72L

A representative survey of Shakespeare's work, covering the different periods of his career and the different genres in which he worked. Offered by the Summer Abroad program.

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE, or any 4.0 FCE.
Exclusion: ENG220H1, ENG220Y1, ENG320Y1

ENG240Y1 - Old English Language and Literature

Hours: 72L

Prepares students to read the oldest English literary forms in the original language. Introduces the earliest English poetry in a woman's voice, expressions of desire, religious fervour, and the agonies of war. Texts, written 680 - 1100, range from the epic of Beowulf the dragon-slayer to ribald riddles.

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG280H1 - Critical Approaches to Literature

Hours: 36L

An introduction to the theory and practice of literary criticism. Focusing on a single text or small group of texts, students will gain experience with close reading and analysis, critical theory, research methods, and the conventions and skills particular to literary-critical writing.

Prerequisite: 1.0 ENG FCE or any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG302Y1 - English Renaissance Literature

Hours: 72L

A survey of some of the major works in English poetry and prose written between 1500 and 1660. Some dramatic literature may be considered as well.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Exclusion: ENG304Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG306Y1 - Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature

Hours: 72L

Writers of this period grapple with questions of authority and individualism, tradition and innovation, in politics, religion, knowledge, society, and literature itself. Special attention to Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, and at least six other authors.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG308Y1 - Romantic Literature

Hours: 72L

Poetry and critical prose of Blake, W. Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P.B. Shelley, and Keats; may include selections from other writers such as Crabbe, Scott, Landor, Clare, D. Wordsworth, M. Shelley, De Quincey.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG322Y1 - The Rise of the Novel

Hours: 72L

This course, spanning from 1660 to the 1830s, studies the emergence of prose fiction as a genre recognized in both a literary and a commercial sense. Authors may include Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Scott, Austen.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG324Y1 - The Victorian Novel

Hours: 72L

Exploring the social and political dilemmas of a culture in transition, this course studies such topics as the comic art of Dickens, Trollope, and Thackeray, the Gothicism of the Brontës, the crisis of religious faith in George Eliot, and the powerful moral fables of Hardy. Students will read 10-12 novels.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG328Y1 - Modern Fiction

Hours: 72L

This course explores ten to twelve works by such writers as James, Conrad, Cather, Forster, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, Faulkner, Rhys, Hemingway, Achebe, Ellison, Spark, Lessing.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG330H1 - Medieval Drama

Hours: 36L

Plays and other texts composed for live performance across the first millennium of English history, primarily 1300-1485; morality plays, biblical pageants, solo performances, large-scale spectacles, mummings, religious rituals, rude songs, recovered fragments. Basic training in reading/translating medieval English sources and in decoding early cues for staging.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG331H1 - Drama 1485-1603

Hours: 36L

Plays and performance history across Britain, 1485 to 1603; the rise of London theatres and of named English and Scottish playwrights (Medwall, Redford, Marlowe, Shakespeare, etc.); anonymous sixteenth-century plays from Cheshire, Yorkshire, East Anglia, and Cambridgeshires; traces of lost performances in the archives.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG335H1 - Drama 1603-1642

Hours: 36L

This course explores English drama from the death of Queen Elizabeth I to the closing of the theatres, with attention to such playwrights as Jonson, Middleton, Shakespeare, Webster.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG337H1 - Drama 1660-1800

Hours: 36L

At least twelve plays, including works by Dryden, Wycherley, Congreve, and their successors, chosen to demonstrate the modes of drama practised during the period, the relationship between these modes and that between the plays and the theatres for which they were designed.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG340H1 - Modern Drama

Hours: 36L

A study of plays in English by such dramatists as Wilde, Yeats, Shaw, Synge, Glaspell, Hughes, O'Neill, as well as plays in translation by such dramatists as Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Pirandello.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG341H1 - Post-Modern Drama

Hours: 36L

A study of plays by such dramatists as Beckett, Miller, Williams, Pinter, Soyinka, Churchill, with background readings from other dramatic literatures.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG347Y1 - Victorian Literature

Hours: 72L

Writers (such as Darwin, Tennyson, Browning, Wilde, Nightingale, Christina Rossetti, Kipling) respond to crisis and transition: the Industrial Revolution, the Idea of Progress, and the "Woman Question"; conflicting claims of liberty and equality, empire and nation, theology and natural selection; the Romantic inheritance, Art-for-Arts-Sake, Fin de siècle, and "Decadence."

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG363Y1 - American Literature to 1900

Hours: 72L

This course explores American writing in a variety of genres from the end of the Revolution to the beginning of the twentieth century.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG364Y1 - American Literature 1900 to the present

Hours: 72L

This course explores twentieth-century American writing in a variety of genres.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENG382Y1 - Literary Theory

Hours: 72L

This course explores contemporary literary theory, but may include related readings from earlier periods. Schools or movements studied may include structuralism, formalism, phenomenology, Marxism, post-structuralism, reader-response theory, feminism, queer theory, new historicism, psychoanalysis, postcolonial theory, critical race studies, and ecocriticism.

Prerequisite: 2.0 ENG FCE and any 4.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ENG390Y1 - Individual Studies

A scholarly project chosen by the student and supervised by a member of the staff. The form of the project and the manner of its execution are determined in consultation with the supervisor. All project proposals should be submitted by May 15. Proposal forms are available online and from the Department. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 3.0 ENG FCE, any 4.0 FCE, and permission of the instructor and the Associate Chair
Exclusion: ENG392H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

ENG391Y1 - Individual Studies (Creative)

A project in creative writing chosen by the student and supervised by a member of the staff. The form of the project and the manner of its execution are determined in consultation with the supervisor. All project proposals should be submitted by May 15. Proposal forms are available online and from the Department. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 3.0 ENG FCE including ENG388H1 or ENG389H1, any 4.0 FCE, and permission of the instructor and the Associate Chair
Exclusion: ENG393H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

ENG392H1 - Individual Studies

A scholarly project chosen by the student and supervised by a member of the staff. The form of the project and the manner of its execution are determined in consultation with the supervisor. All project proposals should be submitted by May 15. Proposal forms are available online and from the Department. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 3.0 ENG FCE, any 4.0 FCE, and permission of the instructor and the Associate Chair
Exclusion: ENG390Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

ENG393H1 - Individual Studies (Creative)

A project in creative writing chosen by the student and supervised by a member of the staff. The form of the project and the manner of its execution are determined in consultation with the supervisor. All project proposals should be submitted by May 15. Proposal forms are available online and from the Department. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: 3.0 ENG FCE including ENG388H1 or ENG389H1, any 4.0 FCE, and permission of the instructor and the Associate Chair
Exclusion: ENG391Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

ENV200H1 - Assessing Global Change: Science and the Environment (formerly ENV200Y1)

Hours: 24L/4T

The perspective which scientists bring to the understanding and resolution of environmental concerns having global implications: atmospheric systems and climate change, the biosphere and conservation of biodiversity.

This living things and their environment breadth course is intended to fulfill the environmental literacy requirement for students in the BA programs of the School of the Environment or the living things and their environment breadth course requirement for Commerce, Humanities and Social Science students

Exclusion: BIO120H1, BIO150Y1 (applies only to students in Arts & Science); ENV200Y1; EEB208H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV223H1 - Fundamental Environmental Skills

Hours: 24L

The practical, interdisciplinary and controversial nature of environmental issues, as well as the uncertainty that surrounds measures to address them demand mastery of a particular range of skills by environmental students. This course teaches the fundamental research, analysis and presentation skills required for effective environmental work.

Corequisite: ENV221H1 and enrolment in a School Major program, or permission of Undergraduate Associate Director.
Exclusion: GGR271H1 (taken in 2010-11 or after); INI223H1 (2005-06 academic year and before)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ENV234H1 - Environmental Biology: Structure and Function of Ecosystems

Hours: 24L/18P

This multidisciplinary course draws on elements from geology, soil science, and ecology to understand past and present environments and human impacts on landscapes and ecosystems. Emphasis on the structure, functioning and connectivity of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Field trips and labs. Mandatory day-long field trip on a Friday or Saturday in late September or early October (students choose which day; a small fee may be charged for transportation.) (Lab Materials Fee: $25)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1/​ JEG100H1 (recommended)/ FOR200H1/​ FOR201H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV237H1 - Physics of the Changing Environment A

Hours: 24L/24P

The course will cover basic physics of environmental processes and of measurement techniques in the atmosphere, the ocean, lake-land-forest systems, and other biological systems. It will place its work in the context of climate change and other aspects of environmental change. This course is solely intended for students who have NOT completed a previous first year physics core course, who are in one of the following programs: Environmental Science Major or Minor, Environmental Geosciences Specialist or Earth and Environmental Systems Major.

Prerequisite: MAT135H1/​ MAT136H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1/​ JMB170Y1, CHM136H1/​ CHM138H1/​ CHM135H1/​ CHM139H1/​ CHM151Y1
Exclusion: ENV238H1, PHY131H1/​ PHY132H1/​ PHY151H1/​ PHY152H1
Recommended Preparation: Any high school physics
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ENV238H1 - Physics of the Changing Environment B

Hours: 24L/24P

The course will cover basic physics of environmental processes and of measurement techniques in the atmosphere, the ocean, lake-land-forest systems, and other biological systems. It will place its work in the context of climate change and other aspects of environmental change. This course is solely intended for students who have completed a previous first year physics core course, who are in one of the following programs: Environmental Science Major or Minor, Environmental Geosciences Specialist or Earth and Environmental Systems Major.

Prerequisite: MAT135H1/​ MAT136H1/​ MAT137Y1/​ MAT157Y1/​ JMB170Y1, CHM136H1/​ CHM138H1/​ CHM135H1/​ CHM139H1/​ CHM151Y1, PHY131H1/​ PHY132H1/​ PHY151H1/​ PHY152H1
Exclusion: ENV237H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ENV281H1 - Special Topics in Environment

Hours: 24L

Special topics course designed for students in School of the Environment programs. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See School of the Environment website for more details.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 4.0 FCEs to register for the course.
Exclusion: BIG102Y1 if ENV281H1 taken in 2015-16 or 2016-17
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV282H1 - Special Topics in the Environment

Hours: 24L

Special topics course designed for students in School of the Environment programs. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See School of the Environment website for more details.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 4.0 FCEs to register for the course.
Exclusion: BIG101Y1 if ENV282H1 taken in 2015-16 or 2016-17
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ENV307H1 - Urban Sustainability (formerly JIE307Y1)

Previous Course Number: JIE307Y1
Hours: 36L

This course critically examines the concept of urban sustainability in theory and application. Case studies of ongoing urban sustainability programs in the developed and developing world help students assess the successes and failures of these programs. The course also examines the current state of research and implementation efforts toward urban sustainability.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Exclusion: INI307Y1 (2005-06 academic year and before)/ JIE307Y1
Recommended Preparation: An environmental studies half course.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV316H1 - Laboratory and Field Methods in Environmental Science

Hours: 12T/36P

This course focuses on methods of sampling and analyzing natural air, water and solid Earth materials for physical, chemical and biological properties that are relevant to current environmental issues. It will integrate approaches from chemistry, physics, geology and biology, and cover techniques in field sampling, laboratory analyses and analyses of large environmental data sets. Basic concepts related to quality control will be emphasized throughout the course: sample collection and storage methods, calibration of field and lab instruments, analyses in complex matrices, errors (accuracy, precision), and detection limits. A fee of approximately $15 may be charged for field trip transportation.

Prerequisite: ENV234H1, ENV237H1/​ ENV238H1, one of CHM210H1/​ ESS262H1, one of STA220H1/​ STA288H1/​ EEB225H1/​ GGR270H1
Exclusion: ESS425H1/​ ENV315H1 (Chemical Analysis of Environmental Samples)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV320H1 - National Environmental Policy (formerly ENV320Y1)

Previous Course Number: ENV320Y1
Hours: 24L/12T

Examines ways in which governments develop and implement policy to protect the environment within their borders. Primarily Canada, plus comparisons with other countries. The focus is upon the politics of environmental policy making, which is understood by examining the interests and powers of the relevant state and non-state actors.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Exclusion: ENV320Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV322H1 - International Environmental Policy (formerly ENV320Y1)

Previous Course Number: ENV320Y1
Hours: 24L/12T

Examines the ways in which states negotiate and implement international agreements addressing global environmental issues, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Focus is upon factors which determine the efficacy of multilateral environmental agreements and the prospects for stronger global environmental governance.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.
Exclusion: ENV320Y1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV323H1 - Ontario Environmental Policy (formerly ENV423H1)

Hours: 24S

Introduces students to public policy and institutional foundations of public policy in Canada, with an emphasis on environmental policy in Ontario. Provides an insiders perspective on how environmental policy has been developed in Ontario.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.
Exclusion: ENV423H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV333H1 - Ecological Worldviews

Hours: 24L

Approaches to environmental concerns are often marked by assumptions that reflect distinct worldviews positing particular understandings of the role of the human with respect to nature. This course explores sundry economic, political, scientific, religious, and moral worldviews pertaining to the environment, including environmental ethics, Gaia, ecofeminism, scientific cosmology, and aboriginal perspectives.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Exclusion: INI333H1 (2005-06 academic year and before)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ENV335H1 - Environmental Design

Hours: 24L

Introduction to understanding the complexity of relationships among people, built forms, and natural systems; systematic review of examples of environmental design at various scales.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Exclusion: INI335H1 (2005-06 academic year and before)
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV337H1 - Human Interactions with the Environment

Hours: 24L/12P

The impact of 7 billion people on the planet is enormous and challenges future generations. What are these impacts today and in future? What solutions and tools can avert societal collapse? Using an integrated and interdisciplinary systems approach, we explore problems and solutions to the earth’s limits to growth.

Prerequisite: (two of ENV233H1, ENV234H1, ENV237H1/​ ENV238H1) or (two of CHM210H1, ENV234H1, ENV237H1/​ ENV238H1, ESS262H1) or ( GGR201H1 + GGR203H1) or ( ENV233H1 + ESS261H1) or ( ESS261H1 + ESS262H1) or ( CHM210H1 + CHM217H1) or ( ENV221H1/​ ENV222H1/​ ENV234H1 + BIO220H1 + BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1) or permission of UndergraduateAssociate Director
Exclusion: JGE236H1
Recommended Preparation: Related high school science
Distribution Requirements: Science

ENV341H1 - Environment and Human Health

Hours: 24L

Examination of the linkages between human health and environment. Addresses basic principles and scientific knowledge relating to health and the environment and uses case studies to examine current environmental health issues from a health sciences perspective.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) or ( BIO230H1/​( BIO240H1, BIO241H1)/ BIO250Y1/​ BIO255Y1 and enrolment in the HMB Specialist in Health and Disease/HMB Specialist in Global Health), and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.
Exclusion: INI341H1 (2005-06 academic year and before)
Distribution Requirements: Science; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV347H1 - The Power of Economic Ideas (formerly ENV447H1)

Previous Course Number: ENV447H1
Hours: 24L

This course examines the power of economic ideas in effecting environmental change. Topics include the relation of ecological economics to mainstream economics, as well as the role of financial incentives to move the environmental agenda forward.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.
Exclusion: ENV447H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV350H1 - Energy Policy and Environment

Hours: 24L

The course addresses: (1) physical, technological and economic aspects of energy and electricity systems and their associated environmental impacts; (2) current international, Canadian and Ontario energy policy; (3) technological, economic and political factors influencing policy which could significantly reduce environmental impacts of energy use.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 8 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV381H1 - Special Topics in Environment

Hours: 24L

Special topics course designed for students in School of the Environment programs. Content in any given year depends on instructor. See School of the Environment website for more details.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 9.0 FCEs to register for the course.
Exclusion: BIG102Y1 if ENV381H1 taken in 2015-16 or 2016-17
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV382H1 - Special Topics in Environment

Hours: 24L

Special topics course designed for students in School of the Environment programs. Content in any given year depends on instructor. Will be offered in 2018-19 on the subject area of religion and environment. See School of the Environment website for more details.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 9.0 FCEs to register for the course.
Exclusion: BIG101Y1 if ENV382H1 taken in 2015-16 or 2016-17
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

ENV421H1 - Environmental Research

Hours: 24S

A research course for all students in the School combining report writing, independent and group-based research on an interdisciplinary topic. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1); completion of 10 FCE or their equivalent, and enrolment in one of the School's core major or collaborative specialist programs; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV422H1 - Environmental Law

Hours: 24S

An introduction to environmental law for students in Environmental Studies; legal methods available to resolve environmental problems and the scope and limits of those methods; common law and statutory tools as well as environmental assessment legislation; the problem of standing to sue and the limits of litigation.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1), and completion of at least 12 FCE of courses; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV451H1 - Current Environmental Topics

Hours: 24S

This capstone course for the School’s core programs will explore current environmental topics, with the goal of integrating the multi- and interdisciplinary strands of each student's learning to date.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1), completion of 12 FCE or their equivalent, and enrolment in one of the School's BA programs; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV452H1 - Environmental Science Seminar

Hours: 36S

Scientists from within and external to the university share and discuss challenges, findings and opportunities. Specific topics (and speakers) vary from year to year but may draw from rehabilitation techniques, contaminants in our environment, environmental health, impacts on landscapes and communities, biodiversity, water, and modelling of environmental processes.

Prerequisite: ENV316H1/​ ENV334H1/​ ENV337H1, completion of 12 FCE of courses, and enrolment in a School of the Environment BSc program; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

ENV461H1 - The U of T Campus as a Living Lab of Sustainability

Hours: 24L

Sustainability is a growing priority for universities all over the world. Many are developing strong operational sustainability goals and targets, and are giving increasing emphasis to teaching and research on sustainability issues. Yet few have committed at the executive level to integrating academic and operational sustainability in the context of treating their campus as a living laboratory of sustainable practice, research and teaching. Arguably, it is such living lab approaches that offer the largest potential for universities to play a significant role in the sustainability transition. This course will explore and apply the living lab concept, in the context of operational sustainability at the University of Toronto. We will begin by looking at the literature on university sustainability and the living lab concept. The bulk of the course will involve undertaking an applied research project on some aspect of campus sustainability, working in close partnership with operational staff at the University of Toronto. Students will develop the skills needed to work across disciplines and fields of study, and with non-academic partners. This course will put students to work on operational sustainability projects identified by the staff working in or with the Sustainability Office at the University of Toronto. Students will be organized into groups, each of which will be assigned one project, to be overseen by one or more U of T staff members. The bulk of the course will consist of regular meetings with the staff “clients”, with instructors, and in small groups to undertake a group project. Each group will produce a mid-term and final report, and give a mid-term and final presentation. Each student will also submit two 360 reviews of the group process. A crucial aspect of this course is the ability of students to work collaboratively together in a group environment, and to work effectively with a university staff person acting as a “client” for their work. Students will be provided with a Handbook outlining information on working in groups and the focus of the class in the second week will be on this issue. The first 360 peer review will serve to provide information on how well each group is working. Students are encouraged to discuss and resolve group process issues in the weekly group meetings, and in their regular meetings with the instructor and TA. The second 360 review will occur at the end of the term. The results of the two 360 reviews will be used, where appropriate, to adjust individual marks from the group averages.

Prerequisite: ENV221H1 and completion of 10 FCE of courses,; or permission of the Academic Associate Director
Exclusion: ENV481H1 if taken in 2016-17
Recommended Preparation: 1.0 FCE of environment-related coursework
Distribution Requirements: Social Science; Science; Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV462H1 - Energy and Environment: Economics, Politics, and Sustainability

Previous Course Number: ENV382H1
Hours: 24L/12T

This is an interdisciplinary course that examines key ideas in economics, politics and security that are essential to understanding energy and environmental issues. The course will cover energy markets, energy security, and the increasing role that sustainability plays in setting policies.

Prerequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 10.0 FCE's to register for the course.
Exclusion: BIG101Y1; ENV382H1 if taken in 2015-16 or 2016-17
Recommended Preparation: ENV221H1, ENV222H1, ENV262H1, and/or ENV362H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ENV481H1 - Special Topics in the Environment

Hours: 24S

Special topics course designed for advanced Specialist and Major students in School of the Environment programs.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 10 FCE and enrolment in a School Environmental program, or permission of Undergraduate Associate Director.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ENV482H1 - Special Topics in the Environment

Hours: 24S

Special topics course designed for advanced Specialist and Major students in School of the Environment programs.

Prerequisite: ( ENV221H1, ENV222H1) and completion of at least 10 FCE and enrolment in a School Environmental program, or permission of Undergraduate Associate Director.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

ESS261H1 - Earth System Evolution

Hours: 24L/36P

Interrelationships between Earths atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere through time; including patterns of evolution and extinction as they are related to changes at the earth's surface and recorded in the rock record. Laboratories cover major groups of fossils, their classification, use in biostratigraphy, and living analogues. NOTE: ESS261H1 and ESS262H1 may be taken in either order; and both are required for advanced courses.

Exclusion: GLG217H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS262H1 - Earth System Processes

Hours: 24L/24P

Processes acting within the Earth system, with particular emphasis on interactions between its components (hydrosphere, atmosphere, biosphere and solid Earth) at long and short timescales. Lecture topics include pre-biotic and post-biotic atmosphere, thermohaline circulation of the oceans, plate tectonics, the rock cycle, regulation of paleoclimates, the global carbon cycle and the terrestrial and marine biosphere.

Exclusion: JEG100H1
Recommended Preparation: PHY131H1/​ CHM138H1/​ BIO120H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS311H1 - Earth System Chemistry 2: Aqueous Geochemistry

Hours: 24L/24P

An introduction to aqueous environmental geochemistry emphasising the importance of chemical equilibria, mass transport, and microbiological activity in regulating the chemical composition of natural and contaminated systems.

Prerequisite: ESS211H1 / ENV233H1
Exclusion: GLG351H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS322H1 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology

Hours: 24L/36P

An overview of the nature and origin of igneous as well as metamorphic rocks, with particular emphasis on the interpretation of textures and mineral assemblages as they reflect rock-forming processes. Laboratory exercises familiarise students with the most common rock types, and provide practical examples of the theoretical principles discussed in lectures. This course also has a mandatory weekend field trip to view igneous and metamorphic rocks and structures in the Bancroft or Montreal area.

Prerequisite: ESS221H1, ESS222H1, ESS223H1/​ ENV233H1, ESS330H1
Exclusion: GLG318H1, GLG319H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS362H1 - Oceanography

Hours: 24L/24P

An introduction to the physical, geological, chemical, and biological processes governing the world’s oceans. The course emphasizes critical thinking, environmental issues, and interrelationships among scientific disciplines.

Prerequisite: 8.0 FCE
Recommended Preparation: 1.0 FCE from ESS102H1/​ PHY131H1/​ PHY132H1/​ CHM138H1/​ CHM139H1/​ BIO120H1/​ MAT135H1 & ESS261H1/​ ESS262H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS425H1 - Analytical Methods for the Geosciences

Hours: 24L/36P

Theory and hands-on learning of current analytical techniques (laboratory work is worth 50% of the final grade). In each lab, groups of two students receive instruction from an experienced analyst and acquire hands-on experience using state-of-the-art analytical equipment. Where possible, samples supplied by the students are analyzed. Techniques covered include Neutron Activation, X-ray Fluorescence, X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Gas Chromatography, Ion Chromatography, Atomic Absorption, Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

Exclusion: ENV315H1
Recommended Preparation: ESS222H1, ESS223H1 & ESS311H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS445H1 - Global Tectonics

Hours: 24L/24P

Exploration of physical Earth processes and their relationship to large-scale geological phenomena. Mantle convection as plate tectonic engine; intraplate/plate boundary lithospheric deformation including orogenesis and crustal subsidence. Focus on reconciling geodynamic theory/modelling with geological/geophysical observations.

Exclusion: GLG465H1
Recommended Preparation: ESS322H1, ESS332H1 & ESS441H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS450H1 - Geophysical Field Techniques

A ten-day field course in late August at the Deep River field site. Students get hands-on experience using geophysical instrumentation, applying various data collection techniques, and performing data analysis in gravity, magnetic, seismic, electrical, electromagnetic, and radar surveys. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Note: Enrollment is handled by the department. For registration deadlines, additional fees associated with the field course, course dates, and special registration requirements, please consult the departmental announcements or inquire with ugrad@es.utoronto.ca. Additional fee of up to $500 will apply.

Recommended Preparation: JGA305H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS452H1 - Geophysical Imaging with Non-seismic Methods

Hours: 24L

Current geophysical surface and borehole methodologies (gravity, magnetics, electrical, electromagnetic, nuclear) and their theoretical basis for investigating Earth's interior to depths ranging from several metres to tens of kilometers.

Exclusion: PHY494H1
Recommended Preparation: ESS345H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS463H1 - Earth System Chemistry 3: Contaminants

Hours: 24L

Disturbances to the Earth system by anthropogenic contaminant input and how to improve environmental quality. Case studies include mining contamination and remediation, and movement of contaminants in air, water, soils, and sediments, particularly in urban areas.

Prerequisite: ESS261H1, ESS262H1, ESS361H1/​ ESS362H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

ESS490H1 - Geological Capstone Fieldtrip

A two-week excursion to a challenging field setting. Students will integrate field observations with their accumulated knowledge of geodynamics, structural geology, and landscape evolution to understand large-scale geological events. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Note: Enrollment is handled by the department. For registration deadlines, additional fees associated with the field course, course dates, and special registration requirements, please consult the departmental announcements or inquire with ugrad@es.utoronto.ca.

Prerequisite: At least 12 FCE of any Earth Science program of study requirements, or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: GLG420H1
Recommended Preparation: ESS261H1, ESS322H1, ESS431H1, ESS441H1, ESS445H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

FAH354H1 - Art in Canada Since the 1960s

Hours: 24L

An examination of the visual arts in Canada from the 1960’s to the present. A large and diverse range of media, practices, artists, and theoretical contexts will be examined. Emphasis is placed on work that can be seen in the original.

Prerequisite: FAH101H1/​ FAH102H1
Exclusion: FAH386H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FCS291H1 - Special Topics in French Cultural Studies I

Hours: 24L

The relation of French popular culture to society. Please go to the French Department website http://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate/courses/french_cultural_studies for the course description.

Prerequisite: None
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

FCS310Y1 - French Cinema

Hours: 48L/48P

Cinema in France with emphasis on theory and practical criticism, on auteurs and movements such as the avant-garde of the twenties and the New Wave of the late fifties. Films shown are subtitled.

Prerequisite: At least 5 course credits in any subject
Recommended Preparation: INI115Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FCS369Y0 - The Culture of Touraine

Hours: 48L

This course will offer a unique opportunity to study the culture of the Touraine region while living an experience of complete immersion in Tours, a city located in the Loire Valley, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the seat of power of the French monarchy until the 17th Century. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (Not offered in Summer 2018)

Prerequisite: At least 5 course credits in any subject
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE272H1 - The French Language: A Linguistic Introduction

Hours: 24L/12T

A general introduction to the structure of French language, from a linguistic perspective. Students will become acquainted with the various components of the language (sound, meaning, word formation, sentence structure) through detailed description and basic analysis of Canadian and European varieties of French. Students will also be introduced to the study of French in the context of bilingualism (second language acquisition, sociolinguistics). This course is mandatory in all specialist and major programs.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment, equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE273H1 - Introduction to the History of the French Language

Hours: 36L

A discovery of a long and fascinating history, stretching from the spoken Latin of the Gauls to the many varieties of French found today all over the world via the investigation of the social, political, and cultural causes of language change. Our focus includes topics such as medieval bilingualism, the regulation of language through the Académie française, the political use of the French language, the emergence of the Francophonie and modern Canadian French.

Prerequisite: FSL221Y1 or, upon first FRE/FSL enrolment, equivalent as determined by the French Placement Test.
Recommended Preparation: FRE272H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE304H1 - Contemporary French Women's Prose Fiction

Hours: 24L

An analysis of selected prose texts of the last hundred years written by major French women authors, emphasizing themes and textual strategies used to represent the female subject, her relationship to language, and the role of ethnicity, class, and gender in the construction of identity.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE310H1 - Relations between Text and Other Media

Hours: 24L

Literary texts and other forms of media (photographs, cinematographic images, paintings) have been associated in a fascinating relation in hundreds of works of French literature. An exploration of this inextricable weaving together of verbal and visual experiences as it pertains to literature through the study of interdisciplinary theoretical texts focused on photography, painting, and cinema.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE314H1 - Quebec and French-Canadian Literature

Hours: 24L

Literature of the 20th and 21st centuries speaks of contesting social and literary figures of authority, of challenging traditional literary structures, and of accentuating creativity and subjectivity. An exploration of the thematic and formal structures that challenge traditional forms of thinking and writing in contemporary literature from Québec and other French-speaking parts of Canada.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE318H1 - Medieval French Literature

Hours: 24L

Religious fervour, chivalry, romance and ribald humour, heroic deeds, marvellous adventures, and exotic travels as found in selected texts from the French Middle Ages. Readings in modern French translations with appropriate reference to the original language.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE319H1 - Laughter and Thought in French Renaissance Literature

Hours: 24L

An overview of the fascinating literary diversity, prose, theatre and poetry essential to the changing humanistic discourse of the French Renaissance and Baroque periods. The underscoring of important historical events - Reformation, Great Discoveries, Printing - to explain the philosophical and literary values produced by such violent times.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE320H1 - French Literature of Classicism and Enlightenment

Hours: 24L

An introduction to French literature between Classicism and the French Revolution with particular emphasis on its relationship to philosophical, cultural, and political movements of the Enlightenment, providing historical depth to philosophical and socio-political foundations of today's life. A privileged access to, and critique of, modernity in the postmodern age.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE324H1 - French Literature in the Time of Revolutions and Industrialization

Hours: 24L

The long 19th century (1789-1914) is characterized by change: from political upheavals to literary, scientific, and media revolutions, the spread of literacy, and the rapid development of industrialization and colonization. A study of the evolution of literature (genres, forms, movements), as influenced by these changing socio-political and economic contexts.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE326H1 - Contemporary French Literature

Hours: 24L

Characterized by experimentation and the crisis of representation, French literature of the 20th and 21st centuries has undergone numerous transformations in form, content, and generic boundaries. A study of these literary movements, trends, and transgressions in poetry, prose, and theatre.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE332H1 - Francophone Literatures

Hours: 24L

A comprehensive introduction to Francophone literatures and cultures, examining the linguistic, aesthetic, and discursive specificities as represented by authors of the Francophone world. Focus on the concepts of colonialism, representation, alienation, emigration, and nationalism.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE334H1 - Francophone Cinema

Hours: 24L

Through films from across the spectrum of the Francophone world, a study of the diversity of the French colonial empire as well as the different aesthetic, historical, and cultural effects of colonialism and post-independence experience on various cinematic representations.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE336H1 - Postcolonialism: Francophone Literatures

Hours: 24L

The fundamentals of postcolonial theories, with emphasis on how they relate to the Francophone world. The dialogue between fiction and theory, as well as the modalities of a coherent Francophone postcolonial identity in a global world.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE344H1 - Literary Theory

Hours: 24L

An introduction to literary theory through the study of particular theories underlying specific approaches to the literary text. Concepts and problems central to literary theory, and the writings of major critics and theoreticians.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE345H1 - Literary Genres

Hours: 24L

Survey of the main literary genres and analysis of their features, with in-depth study of two of the genres: narrative (epic poem, novel, short narrative), lyric poetry, drama (tragedy, comedy, farce, mystery play), essay. Readings of selected texts, chosen for their representative potential and their historical relevance.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1
Recommended Preparation: FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE351H0 - Special Topics in Linguistics or Literature

The course is part of an international agreement between the University of Toronto and the University of Nice. Students will take the course in Nice.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1 and/or FRE272H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE352H0 - Special Topics in Linguistics or Literature

The course is part of an international agreement between the University of Toronto and the University of Nice. Students will take the course in Nice.

Prerequisite: FRE240H1 and/or FRE272H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE376H1 - French Phonology and Phonetics

Hours: 24L

A study of the phonological and phonetic systems of modern French based on actual samples of speech taken from different regional varieties and socio-economic groups.

Prerequisite: FRE272H1, FRE274H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

FRE383H1 - Quantitative Methods for the Study of French

Hours: 24L

An introduction to the foundations of quantitative research on French. Topics include differences between quantitative and qualitative analyses; hypothesis formulation; experimental design; and data collection and analysis including basic statistical methods. Phenomena investigated come from Canadian and European varieties as well as studies of second language learners.

Prerequisite: FRE272H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

FRE384H1 - Teaching French as a Second Language

Hours: 24L

This course provides an introduction to the communicative approach in recent methods and pedagogical materials published in France and North America. Emphasis is put on the various interpretations of the communicative approach in teaching French as a Second Language, with reference to theoretical issues and historical background.

Prerequisite: FRE272H1, FSL321Y1, FRE225Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE410H1 - Advanced Topics in Quebec Literature:

Hours: 24S

An advanced interdisciplinary research seminar devoted to specific issues of Québécois literature and culture. Focus on a literary genre, a particular subject matter, a literary movement, or based on a multidisciplinary approach to cinema, arts, and music. For more information, see http://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate/courses/french_literature

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1, FRE344H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE438H1 - Advanced Topics in Francophone Literatures

Hours: 24S

An advanced seminar dedicated to specific issues of the Francophone literature and culture. Focusing on an author, a literary genre, or based on a multidisciplinary approach involving cinema, arts and music, each seminar reflects the professor’s current research. For more information, see http://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate/courses/french_literature

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1, FRE344H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE441H1 - Advanced Topics in French Literature

Hours: 24S

An advanced, research-oriented seminar devoted to specific issues of French literature and culture. Focus on a literary genre, a particular subject or literary movement, or based on a multidisciplinary approach involving cinema, arts, and music. For more information, see http://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate/courses/french_literature

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1, FRE344H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE443H1 - Advanced Topics

Hours: 24S

An advanced, research-oriented seminar devoted to questions concerning the authors practice, originality, and oeuvre. Production, performance and prominence, characteristic genres, religious and philosophical thought, theoretical reflection on literature, language, and belonging as aspects of the analysis of one single authors body of writing. For more information, see http://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate/courses/french_literature

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1, FRE344H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE446H1 - Advanced Studies in Literary Theory

Hours: 24S

An advanced, research-oriented course devoted to specific issues in French literary theory. Focus on particular theoretical concepts, paradigms, schools, trends, movements or major thinkers. For more information, see http://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate/courses/french_literature

Prerequisite: FRE240H1/​ FRE245H1, FRE241H1/​ FRE246H1, FRE344H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE471H1 - Medieval French Language

Hours: 24S

This course aims to ensure an understanding of Old French, to read most of the medieval texts. From a selection of texts, it explores the form of the language in various centuries and regions and provide a basis for understanding the history of the French language. This course is also listed in the offerings of the Graduate department of French.

Prerequisite: FRE272H1/​ FRE273H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE483H1 - Teaching French in Context: Language, Culture, and Society

Hours: 24L

The course investigates the relation between language, society, and culture and studies various aspects of French and Francophone civilization, with particular focus on the development and integration of materials for use in the classroom including contemporary texts and audio-visual documents.

Prerequisite: FRE384H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FRE490Y1 - Senior Essay

A research project on a linguistic, literary, or second language learning topic to be proposed by the student and supervised by a Faculty member, culminating in a major research paper. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Any 300+ FRE Linguistics/Literature/Second Language Learning course. Permission of Department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

FRE491H1 - Independent Study

A research project on a linguistic, literary, or second language learning topic to be proposed by the student and supervised by a Faculty member on a topic of common interest, including readings, discussions, papers. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Any 300+ FRE Linguistics/Literature/Second Language Learning course. Permission of Department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

FRE492H1 - Independent Study

A research project on a linguistic, literary, or second language learning topic to be proposed by the student and supervised by a Faculty member on a topic of common interest, including readings, discussions, papers. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Any 300+ FRE Linguistics/Literature/Second Language Learning course. Permission of Department.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities

FSL350Y0 - French Language and Culture

The course is part of an international agreement between the University of Toronto and the University of Nice. Students will take the course in Nice.

Prerequisite: Any 200-series FRE course or FSL221Y1 (minimum 63%)
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

FSL375Y1 - Practical Translation: French - English

Hours: 72L

A comparative study of the characteristics of French and English expression and how they pertain to the problems of translation and an introduction to the main aspects of translation through the study of texts of varied natures and origins.

Prerequisite: 1.0 FCE in FSL at the 300-level, or any 1.0 FCE in FRE at the 200-level.
Exclusion: FSL421Y1 and higher.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

GGR217H1 - Urban Landscapes and Planning

Hours: 24L/4T

Considers the role of planning in shaping the urban landscape through historical and contemporary examples that illustrate the interplay of modernist and post-modernist approaches to city building. Traces the origins, competing rationalities and lingering effects of planning in the production of urban space. Broaches possibilities for engaging planning critically to address challenges of social and environmental justice in cities today.

Exclusion: GGR361H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR240H1 - Geographies of Colonialism in North America

Hours: 24L/5T

This course considers the creation and consolidation of settler colonies in the region known to many as North America. With an eye to the colonial present, the course focuses on the period from the 15th century to the early 20th century. Cultural texts and place-specific cases are used to ground themes and processes that also bear on the wider field of historical geography, including narratives of discovery and possession; ecological imperialism and environmental transformation; the (re)settlement of land and colonial government; enslavement and industrialization; frontiers, borders, and resource extraction; and some of the Indigenous geographies that preceded, were transformed by and transformed, and exceeded the reach of colonial power.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR270H1 - Introductory Analytical Methods

Hours: 24L/12T

Theory and practical application of elementary quantitative techniques in geography emphasizing descriptive, inferential and spatial statistical analysis, probability, and sampling.

Exclusion: ECO220Y1/​ ECO227Y1/​ GGR270Y1/​ LIN305H1/​ POL222H1/​ POL242Y1/​ PSY201H1/​ SOC200H1/​ SOC202H1/​ STA220H1/​ STA248H1/​ STA250H1/​ STA261H1
Recommended Preparation: 0.5 FCE in Geography
Distribution Requirements: Social Science; Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

GGR329H1 - The Global Food System

Hours: 24L

Explores the changing global geographies of food by tracing international movements of food through both mainstream and 'alternative' supply chains. The implications for sustainability, food security, community autonomy and health are investigated.

Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including 1.0 FCE in Geography (SOC SCI/BR=3). GGR107H1 recommended.
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

GGR458H1 - Selected Topics in Urban Geography

Hours: 24L

This course focuses on a special topic in urban geography and covers it with more depth than would otherwise be the case in a survey-oriented class. The aim is to utilize this single topic as a vehicle to understanding how urban geographical ideas are produced more widely. Check the department website for the theme (updated each year).

Prerequisite: 10.0 FCE's
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HAJ453H1 - AIDS: A Global Perspective

Hours: 6L/18S

Seminars explore the global AIDS crisis, adopting the medical-anthropological perspective of Paul Farmer's Infections and Inequalities. Varying epidemiological profiles of AIDS are placed in broader social, cultural, and political-economic frameworks. The impact of globalization and structural inequality on local cultures and lifestyles provides an essential backdrop to the discussions.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, ANT208H1/​ BIO220H1/​ PHS300H1/​ JNH350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS102Y1 - Empires, Encounters and Exchanges

Hours: 48L/20T

Interactions among peoples, empires, and cultures, with particular attention to the non-European world. Can we speak of “international relations” before the modern concept of nation-states was established? What forms did globalization take in the pre-modern era? Covering a broad chronological sweep from before the Silk Road to the present day, we will look at exchanges of goods and technologies; dissemination of ideas and religions; voyages of migration and exploration; and episodes of conquest and colonization.

Exclusion: Any 100-level HIS course, with the exception of AP, IB, CAPE, or GCE transfer credits. HISA04H3/​ HISA05H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS107Y1 - Approaches to East Asian History

Hours: 48L/20T

This course draws on the history of China, Korea and Japan between 1600 to 1950 to explore historical issues of gender, nationalism, war and relations with the West.

Exclusion: Any 100-level HIS course, with the exception of AP, IB, CAPE, or GCE transfer credits. HIS284H5/​ EAS204Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS220Y1 - The Shape of Medieval Society

Hours: 48L/20T

Economic, political, religious, and educational ideas and institutions of the Middle Ages, from the late Roman period to the fifteenth century.

Exclusion: HIS220Y5/​ HIS220H5/​ HIS221H5/​ HISB60H3/​ HISB61H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS241H1 - Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1914

Hours: 24L/10T

An introduction to modern European history from Napoleon to the outbreak of World War I. Important political, economic, social, and intellectual changes in France, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Italy, and other countries are discussed: revolution of 1848, Italian and German unification, racism and imperialism, the evolution of science, art, and culture, labour protest, and the coming of war.

Exclusion: EUR200Y1/​ EUR200Y5/​ FGI200Y5/​ HIS241H5/​ HISB93H3
Recommended Preparation: HIS103Y1/​ HIS109Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS242H1 - Europe in the 20th Century

Hours: 24L/10T

The evolution of European politics, culture, and society from 1914: the two world wars, Fascism and Nazism, the post-1945 reconstruction and the movement towards European integration.

Exclusion: EUR200Y1/​ EUR200Y5/​ FGI200Y5/​ HIS242H5/​ HISB94H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS250Y1 - History of Russia (formerly HIS250H1)

Hours: 48L/20T

This course is an introductory survey that examines the political, social, and cultural developments that shaped the Russian empire from the settlement of Kiev in the 9th century to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Exclusion: HIS250H1/​ HIS250H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS263Y1 - Introduction to Canadian History

Hours: 48L/15T

An introductory survey to the major events and trends that have shaped the political, social and economic history of Canada, including the challenges of indigenous-newcomer and French-English relations over more than four centuries of interactions.

Exclusion: HIS262Y1/​ HIS262H1/​ HIS264H1/​ HIS263Y5/​ HIS261H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS271Y1 - American History Since 1607

Hours: 48L/20T

A survey of the economic, social, cultural, and political history of the United States from the colonial era to present times.

Exclusion: HIS271H5/​ HIS272H5/​ HISB30H3/​ HISB31H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS282Y1 - History of South Asia

Hours: 48L/20T

An introductory survey addressing major themes in the history of South Asia, examining South Asian political economy, social history, colonial power relations and the production of culture. Emphasis is on the period after 1750, particularly the study of colonialism, nationalism, and postcolonial citizenship and modernity.

Exclusion: HIS282H5/​ HISB57H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS291H1 - Latin America: The Colonial Period (formerly HIS291Y1)

Hours: 24L/10T

The evolution of Spanish and Portuguese America from pre-Columbian civilizations to the wars of independence.

Exclusion: HIS291Y1/​ HIS290H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS292H1 - Latin America: The National Period (formerly HIS292Y1)

Hours: 24L/10T

A survey of Latin American history from the wars of independence to the present day.

Exclusion: HIS292Y1/​ HIS290H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS295Y1 - African History and Historical Methodology

Hours: 48L/24T

An introduction to African history and the methodology of history more broadly, this course sets out to question how historians do history, examine differences in theories of knowledge, and explore the relationship between academic and cultural representations of the past. The course also draws on anthropology and related disciplines.

Exclusion: HIS381H1/​ HIS382H1/​ HIS295H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1); Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HIS309H1 - The European Reformations

Hours: 36L

What happens when a culture changes its religious organization and beliefs? Social and intellectual upheavals beginning in fifteenth century Europe created the split between Catholic and protestant Christians and reshaped the spiritual and political landscape of sixteenth century Europe. Issues covered include religion and politics, toleration, gender, popular piety, class.

Prerequisite: HIS243H1 / VIC240Y1 or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: HIS340H5/​ RLG346H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS311Y1 - Introduction to Canadian International Relations

Hours: 48L/10T

Canadian international affairs in a broader context. Anglo-American as well as Canadian-American relations; the European background to questions such as the League of Nations, appeasement and rearmament, which directly affected Canada without this country being consulted.

Exclusion: HIS311H5/​ HISC46H3
Recommended Preparation: A course in Canadian history or politics
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS324H1 - British Imperial Experience, 1600-2000

Hours: 24L

The British empire, at its zenith, covered one-quarter of the earth's land surface. Whatever the rights and wrongs of its history were, the legacies of this global experience continue to influence politics in today's world. Equal coverage is given to early modern and modern history. Some background in British history or international relations is strongly recommended. This course begins at home with English expansionism in the British Isles before moving on to deal with case studies selected from North America, the Caribbean, Africa, South Asia and East Asia. Coherence comes from thematic foci consisting of economics, law, migration, gender and governance.

Prerequisite: HIS103Y1/​ HIS109Y1/​ HIS241H1/​ HIS244H1/​ HIS245H1/​ HIS368H1/​ HIS337H1/​ HIS349H1
Exclusion: HISB02H3
Recommended Preparation: HIS102Y1/​ HIS103Y1/​ HIS109Y1/​ HIS202H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS338H1 - The Holocaust, to 1942 (formerly HIS338Y1/398Y1)

Hours: 24L/5T

German state policy towards the Jews in the context of racist ideology, bureaucratic structures, and varying conditions in German-occupied Europe. Second Term considers responses of Jews, European populations and governments, the Allies, churches, and political movements.

Prerequisite: Completion of six undergraduate full-course equivalents
Exclusion: HIS388Y1/​ HIS398Y1/​ HIS338H5
Recommended Preparation: A course in modern European history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS351Y1 - History of Twentieth-Century Russia

Hours: 48L

A survey of the history of Twentieth-Century Russia. The social, economic, and political development of Twentieth-Century Russia, with an emphasis on the Russian Revolution and Stalinism. Stress is placed on modern historiographical issues.

Exclusion: HIS351H1/​ HIS351H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS357Y0 - The Renaissance

Exclusion: HIS357Y1/​ HIS357H1/​ HIS357Y5/​ HIS357H5

HIS357Y1 - A Social History of Renaissance Europe (formerly HIS357H1)

Hours: 48L

A social history of the 15th and 16th centuries set against the cultural and political background. Emphasis on changes in customs and living conditions resulting from economic, legal, intellectual, and religious developments of the period.

Exclusion: HIS357H1/​ HIS357Y0/​ HIS357Y5/​ HIS357H5
Recommended Preparation: A course in Renaissance or Early Modern European history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS361H1 - The Holocaust, from 1942

Hours: 24L/5T

Follows on HIS338H1. Themes include: resistance by Jews and non-Jews; local collaboration; the roles of European governments, the Allies, the churches, and other international organizations; the varieties of Jewish responses. We will also focus on postwar repercussions of the Holocaust in areas such as justice, memory and memorialization, popular culture and politics.

Prerequisite: completion of 6 undergraduate full-course equivalents and HIS338H1
Exclusion: HIS338Y1/​ HIS361H5
Recommended Preparation: a course in modern European history
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS367Y0 - Making and Re-Making Central Europe: Imperial Pasts, Imperial Aspirations, Wars and Revolutions

Hours: 48L

The cities of Central Europe, and most notably those of the Habsburg Empire, were at the forefront of Europe’s cultural, artistic and intellectual development until the outbreak of the Second World War. Moreover, these cities remain living monuments to the achievements of European culture to the present day. These cities also represent some of the darker aspects of European history. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the history of Central Europe, the complex historical role of central European cities, their interaction with imperial and then national cultres, economies and societies, and their importance in creating modern nation states.

Offered in summer only as part of the Summer Abroad Program.

Prerequisite: 1 FCE in History
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS372H1 - Topics in U.S. History

Hours: 24L

In-depth examination of selected periods or themes in U.S. history. Topic in any given year depends on instructor. See History website for more details.

Prerequisite: HIS271Y1
Exclusion: HIS372H5/​ HISD36H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS383Y1 - Women in African History (formerly HIS383H1)

Hours: 24L

This course subjects our increasing knowledge about African women’s history from the mid-19th century to the present to critical analysis. It goes beyond restoring women to history and seeing African women as victims impacted upon and struggling against colonialism and neo-colonialism. It examines how African women’s lived experiences have been represented, packaged, and delivered to different audiences.

Prerequisite: HIS295Y1/​ HIS297Y1/​ NEW150Y1/​ NEW250Y1/​NEW351Y/ POL301Y1 or permission from the Instructor
Exclusion: HIS383H1/​ HISC97H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS391Y1 - Black Freedom in the Atlantic World

Hours: 72L

Black writers and historical actors were at the vanguard of re-conceiving, implementing, and realizing much of the Enlightenment project of freedom. Africans and people of African descent significantly affected its meaning in the Atlantic world. The course sets out to explore this history as well as the contemporary practice of freedom.

Prerequisite: A course in African or European history
Exclusion: HIS296Y1/​ HIS371H5/​ HISC70H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS401Y1 - History of the Cold War

Previous Course Number: HIS401H1
Hours: 48S

This course covers international relations from World War II to the collapse of the Soviet Union. Topics include the breakdown of the wartime alliance, Soviet predominance in eastern Europe, the Western response, NATO, atomic weaponry.

Prerequisite: HIS311Y1/​ HIS344H1/​ HIS344Y1/​ HIS377H1
Exclusion: HIS401H1, HIS306H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS407H1 - Imperial Germany, 1871-1918 (formerly HIS407Y1)

Hours: 24S

Historiographical controversies and the latest empirical findings concerning social conflict and political mobilization under Bismarck and Wilhelm II. Problems raised by competing schools of interpretation include definitions of the authoritarian state, bourgeois hegemony, localism and regionalism, radical nationalism, workers 'culture, and gender relations. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS317H1 or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: HIS407Y1/​ HIS407H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS424H1 - Violence in Medieval Society (formerly HIS424Y1)

Hours: 24S

This seminar explores the social function and meaning of violence in medieval society, and the development of rituals and institutions to control violence. Among the topics treated: Germanic blood feud, aristocratic violence and chivalry, criminal justice systems, violence against minorities, and violence and gender. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS220Y1/​ HIS320H1/​ HIS321H1/​ HIS322H1
Exclusion: HIS424Y1/​ HIS327Y5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS457H1 - The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire

Hours: 24S

Explores the central themes in the history of France during the Revolution and the First Empire. We will consider the periods principal political, social and cultural aspects: the causes of the French Revolution; the shift from constitutional monarchy to Republic; the relationship between politics and religion; the invention of a new republican political culture; counterrevolution and Terror; the Directory; Bonaparte's rise to power; the Napoleonic Empire; the nature of war during the Empire; the Restoration; and the Revolution's legacy in France and beyond today.

Prerequisite: HIS243H1/​ HIS244H1/​ HIS319H1/​ HIS341Y1/​ HIS387H1
Exclusion: HISC26H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS466H1 - Topics in Canadian History (formerly HIS466Y1)

Hours: 24S

Selected topics in a specific period of Canadian history. Content in any given year depends on instructor. Please see the History Department website for complete description.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/​ HIS264H1 or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HIS472H1 - Indigenous-Newcomer Relations in Canadian History (formerly HIS472Y1)

Hours: 24S

The trajectory of Canadian history has been (and continues to be) shaped significantly by the changing relationships between indigenous peoples and newcomers to what is now Canada. Through discussion of readings on various seminar topics, we will explore the multi-faceted contours of these relationships, from cultural encounters, treaties & alliances, and missionization to colonization, assimilation, residential schools and contemporary issues.

Prerequisite: HIS263Y1/​ HIS264H1 (minimum 73%)
Exclusion: HIS472Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HMB200H1 - Introduction to Neuroscience

Hours: 24L/12T

An introductory course that explores the development, physiology and continually changing function of the nervous system as it relates to certain types of human behaviour. Critical analysis of scientific evidence is used to enrich learning.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Recommended Preparation: PSL300H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB202H1 - Introduction to Health and Disease

Hours: 24L/12P

An introductory course in Health and Disease using an interdisciplinary approach that integrates bacteriology and virology with other aspects of human biology, including chronic disease and neoplasia. An exploration of the key concepts and approaches that are necessary for understanding the dynamic nexus of human health and disease. (Lab Fees: $50)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Exclusion: HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Recommended Preparation: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB203H1 - Introduction to Global Health

Hours: 24L/12T

An introductory course covering the theories, operational components and strategies of implementing health care in resource-poor settings. Topics may include education, control of vector-borne diseases, essential drug provision, maternal and child health, nutrition, incorporation of alternative and complementary technologies, community participation and deployment of health service providers

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Exclusion: HMB202H1/​ HMB204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB300H1 - Neurobiology of Behaviour

Hours: 24L/12T

This neuroscience course focuses on higher brain functions and the mechanisms underlying human and animal behaviours. Topics may include the emerging role of the gut microbiome's impact on behaviour, pathogens that alter neuronal development and the biological basis of mindfulness and placebos. In addition, the impact that exercise and sleep play in modulating these behaviours are examined. Common experimental techniques used in neuroscience research such as brain imaging and cellular genetics are emphasized.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, HMB200H1/​ PSY290H1/​ PSL300H1/​ CJH332H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB301H1 - Biotechnology

Hours: 24L/12T

Students gain an appreciation for how science, business, government and society drive the development of biotechnology products. Topics include stem cells and regenerative medicine, diagnostics, cancer therapy, biotechnology in the developing world, antibiotic alternatives, and patents.

Prerequisite: HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB310H1 - Laboratory in Neuroscience

Hours: 12L/36P

A laboratory course based on current research techniques for students in the Neuroscience program. Lab topics may include human brain imaging and disorders, electrophysiology, cell culture, and changes in gene expression during neuronal development. (Lab Materials Fee: $51)

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB200H1/​ PSY290H1, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Corequisite: PSL300H1
Exclusion: HMB311H1/​ HMB312H1/​ HMB314H1/​ PSY359H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB311H1 - Laboratory in Fundamental Genetics and its Applications

Hours: 12L/36P

A laboratory course based on current research techniques for students in the Fundamental Genetics and its Applications programs. Lab topics may include molecular biology and animal cell culture techniques, nutrigenomics; an overview of microarrays and a CRISPR module. (Lab Materials Fee: $51)

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB201H1, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Exclusion: HMB310H1/​ HMB312H1/​ HMB314H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB312H1 - Laboratory in Health and Disease

Hours: 12L/36P

A laboratory course based on current research techniques and topics which may include basic microbiology, molecular biology and animal cell culture techniques, immunocytochemistry, changes in gene expression, and histological techniques. (Lab Materials Fee: $51)

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Corequisite: BCH210H1
Exclusion: HMB310H1/​ HMB311H1/​ HMB314H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB314H1 - Laboratory in Human Biology

Hours: 12L/36P

Students analyze whole body, cellular, and molecular responses to stress. Techniques range from those standard in medical practice (e.g., fitness measures, blood pressure, lung function) to current research techniques (cell culture, changes in gene expression). Students gain technical and analytical skills as they work at the bench to design and carry out individual and group experiments. (Lab Materials Fee: $50)

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Corequisite: PSL300H1, PSL301H1
Exclusion: HMB310H1/​ HMB311H1/​ HMB312H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB320H1 - Neuroanatomy

Hours: 24L/4T/10P

This is a rigorous, introductory course that addresses the structure of the vertebrate central nervous system with an emphasis on functional human neuroanatomy. It is designed for students who intend to continue with studies in the Neurosciences and related areas.

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, PSL300H1, HMB200H1/​ PSY290H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB322H1 - Topics in Health & Disease

Hours: 24L/12T

Explore the scientific basis and interdisciplinary healthcare practices of several diseases (diseases vary by year). Discuss current issues related to the biology and the impact of these diseases.

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, PSL300H1
Corequisite: PSL301H1
Recommended Preparation: HMB302H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB342H1 - Epidemiology of Health & Disease

Hours: 24L/24T

This course engages students in the fundamental science of epidemiology applied to health and disease. After an introduction to various measures of health and disease, the scientific methods used to investigate, analyze, prevent and control health problems will be illustrated using biomedical and public health examples.

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Exclusion: HST373H1
Recommended Preparation: STA288H1 or other statistics course
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB360H1 - Neurogenomics

Hours: 24L/12T

Genetic basis of both the normal and abnormal development of the nervous system and its function. Topics include the regulation of neural gene expression, the role of epigenetics on neuron function, genome wide association studies and disorders of brain and behaviour, optogenetic and pharmacogenetic techniques to probe neural circuit function. Tutorials emphasize critical analysis of primary research.

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, HMB200H1/​ HMB201H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB401H1 - Biomedical Advances & Technologies

Hours: 24L/12T

This course introduces life science students to biomedical advances and technologies in medicine, including drug patents, medical device implants, diagnostic and medical device software. Limitations of patent protection in commercializing medical products, and limitations to scalability may also be discussed. Specific topics vary from year to year and will be based on the course instructor's area(s) of expertise.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB301H1/​ HMB321H1/​ BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ PSL350H1, HMB201H1/​ HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Recommended Preparation: a statistics course
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB402H1 - Topics in Translational Medicine

Hours: 18L/6S

The bridge between basic scientific research and clinical practice integrates fundamental knowledge about molecular/cellular mechanisms and clinical disorders to increase the potential for new medical treatments, therapies and interventions as well as understanding of disease processes. Specific topics vary from year to year and will be based on the course instructor's area(s) of expertise.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, BCH210H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, HMB302H1/​ HMB321H1/​ HMB322H1/​ BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ PSL350H1, and HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ PSL350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB420H1 - Seminar in Neurobiology of Behaviour

Hours: 12L/12S

This seminar course focuses on recent research into the neurobiology underlying human behaviour. A variety of normal and abnormal human behaviours are studied which may include: voluntary action; moral cognition; hedonism; aggression; mental health; addiction; the impact of the gut microbiome on brain development and health.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB200H1, HMB300H1, HMB320H1/​ ANA300Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB421H1 - Seminar in Fundamental Genetics and its Applications

Hours: 12L/12S

Theme based lecture and seminar course underlining current medical research in relation to the areas of genes and genetics. Topics vary yearly.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, HMB201H1
Recommended Preparation: HMB321H1/​ BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ PSL350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB422H1 - Seminar in Health & Disease

Hours: 16L/8S

This course focuses on various medical research related to human disease. Topics vary based on course instructor's area(s) of expertise.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, PSL300H1, PSL301H1, HMB302H1/​ HMB322H1, and HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB430H1 - Trends in Neuroscience

Hours: 18L/6S

Current research covering the breadth of neuroscience is showcased by members of the Collaborative Program in Neuroscience. Topics vary yearly, but cover the spectrum from molecular through genetic, cellular, developmental, systems, behavioural and modelling. As well, approaches to studying neurodegenerative diseases and clinical neurophysiology are introduced.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB200H1, CJH332H1, HMB320H1/​ JHA410H1/​ ANA300Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB431H1 - Innovation in Applied Genetics

Hours: 16L/8S

This course explores innovation in research and technology in the field of applied genetics. Specific topics vary from year to year and will be based on the course instructor's area(s) of expertise.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB321H1, HMB201H1/​ HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HMB432H1 - Topics in Histology & Histopathology

Hours: 12L/12S

Lecture and seminar course emphasizing current research. Topics may include the digestive system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, stem cells, and neoplasia. Topics vary depending on class interest.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB302H1/​ HMB322H1
Recommended Preparation: BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ PSL350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB434H1 - Complementary & Integrative Medicine

Hours: 20L/4S

Introduction to complementary and alternative medical therapies. Topics include, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Naturopathy, Ayurvedic, and Mind-Body Practices. Biological mechanisms will be emphasized and therapies will be critically analyzed from an evidence-based research perspective. Integrating alternative therapies into Western practices with a focus on personalized medicine will be discussed.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, BCH210H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, HMB302H1/​ HMB312H1/​ HMB314H1/​ HMB322H1/​ HMB323H1/​ HMB342H1, and HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Recommended Preparation: HMB342H1/​ CSB349H1/​ PSL350H1/​ BCH311H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB435H1 - Selected Topics in Molecular Cell Biology

Hours: 16L/8S

Theme-based lecture and seminar course underlining current basic science research in the area of molecular and cell biology, focusing on cell migration and its relevance to human health and disease. Topics may focus on the impact of fundamental processes underlying the cell biology, physiology and pathophysiology of cell motility in a variety of systems (e.g. immune, nervous system, cancer context).

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ PSL350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB436H1 - Medical and Veterinary Mycology

Hours: 24L

This lecture-based course will familiarize students with fungi of public health importance, particularly those that cause disease in humans and other animals. The course will focus on the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and treatment of fungal infections, as well as the ecology, physiology and evolutionary biology of the agents responsible. The course will also address other ways in which fungi influence human and animal health.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO220H1
Recommended Preparation: EEB268H1, EEB331H1/​ CSB353H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB437H1 - The Biology of the Human Metallome

Hours: 24L

This course will discuss how heavy metals are integral to organ function through various biological pathways, the importance of metal regulation and control and its relationship with gene transcription. An introduction of metallo-therapeutics will also be featured, ranging from neurodegenerative therapies to cancer treatment.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BCH210H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB440H1 - Dementia

Hours: 18L/10P/6S

This course, featuring a service-learning component, explores dementia. In patients with dementia, intellectual, social and occupational functioning deteriorate. The course addresses the multi-disciplinary aspects of dementia (clinical, genetic, molecular, social) with a focus on the most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease.

 

A short application to enrol in this course is required. Information may be found via the Human Biology Program website.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, PSL300H1, HMB300H1/​ HMB302H1/​ HMB320H1/​ HMB321H1/​ ANA300Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB441H1 - Genetics of Human Disease

Hours: 24L

This advanced course aims to provide students with current, in-depth knowledge of the genetics of specific human diseases, including single gene (e.g., Huntington disease), multifactorial (e.g. Alzheimer’s disease), and non-Mendelian (e.g. mitochondrial DNA-related disease) disorders, and how the use of genetics to elucidate disease mechanisms can lead to treatments and personalized medicine in order to improve healthcare.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB265H1/​ BIO260H1, BCH210H1, HMB302H1/​ HMB321H1/​ HMB322H1/​ BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1/​ PSL350H1, and HMB201H1/​ HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Recommended Preparation: HMB321H1, PSL300H1, PSL301H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB450H1 - Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Diseases

Hours: 24L/12T

Proper development of the human brain is essential for human health. This course will examine how neurodevelopment failures contribute to neurological disorders and diseases, such as epilepsy and autism. Current research from basic, translational, and clinical perspectives will be examined using case studies. The impact of neurodevelopmental disorders and diseases on the individual and community will be discussed.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB200H1, HMB320H1/​ ANA300Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB452H1 - Personalized Medicine

Hours: 12L/12S

The bridge between basic scientific research and clinical practice integrates fundamental knowledge about molecular/cellular mechanisms and clinical disorders to increase the potential for new medical treatments, therapies and interventions as well as understanding of disease processes. Specific topics vary from year to year and will be based on the course instructor's area(s) of expertise.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB302H1/​ HMB321H1/​ HMB322H1, HMB201H1/​ HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HMB470H1 - Exercise and Sports Medicine

Hours: 20L/4S

This course introduces biomechanics and builds on knowledge of the biomechanics of injury and dysfunction to develop a systematic understanding of risk, injury prevention, and initial management of injuries in sports and physical activities. Some additional topics include doping in sport, travel issues in competitive sport, and ethical issues in clinical sport medicine.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, PSL300H1, PSL301H1, HMB200H1/​ HMB201H1/​ HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB471H1 - Performance Enhancement

Hours: 20L/4S

Enhancing performance has broad appeal. This course explores current developments for achieving peak performance academically, physically and emotionally. We focus on the scientific basis of the links between performance and stress, and of the benefits and risks of pharmacological methods to achieve performance enhancement. Various stress management skills are introduced.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, PSL300H1, HMB200H1/​ HMB201H1/​ HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB472H1 - Exercise Physiology

Hours: 20L/4S

Examine the physiological and biochemical responses of the human body to both acute and chronic bouts of physical activity. The impact of activity on health, and health on physical activity, is explored by examining adaptations from the cellular to the systemic level of bodily function.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, PSL300H1, PSL301H1, HMB200H1/​ HMB201H1/​ HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB473H1 - Exercise and Mental Health

Hours: 18L/10P/6S

This course, featuring a service-learning component, discusses how mental well-being is a critical element of total health. We explore the evidence underpinning the role of physical activity in the avoidance of mental disorders, recovery from mental disorders, and the quality of life of those with or without mental disorders.

A short application to enrol in this course is required. Information may be found via the Human Biology Program website.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, PSL300H1, PSL301H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB474H1 - Dental Sciences

Hours: 12L/12S

Dentistry is one of the oldest branches of medicine responsible for the treatment of diseases of oral cavity. This course will introduce students to the key concepts as well as the latest research in the dental sciences, including but not limited to craniofacial structures, bone physiology, odontogenesis, pathogenesis of oral diseases, and technology in dental sciences.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, PSL300H1, PSL301H1, HMB200H1/​ HMB201H1/​ HMB202H1/​ HMB203H1/​ HMB204H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB489H1 - Advanced Laboratory in Human Biology

Hours: 72P

Building on their experience in 3rd-year labs, students participate in inquiry-based laboratory experiments in diverse areas of current human biology research. Open to students in any Human Biology program. Please see Human Biology Program Website for subtopic details, which vary from year to year. (Lab Materials Fee: $51)

Prerequisite: 14 FCE complete, HMB310H1/​ HMB311H1/​ HMB312H1/​ HMB314H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

HMB496Y1 - Research Project in Human Biology

A research project course for students enrolled in a Human Biology program, supervised by a faculty member appointed in a faculty or division at St. George Campus (Faculties of Arts & Science, Medicine, Engineering, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, etc.). Open to third and fourth year students.

 

Students are responsible for securing their own supervisor. Should a HMB Specialist require help securing a supervisor, the request must be made by email to the Human Biology Program Office no later than July 20 for Academic year projects and January 30 for Summer projects.

 

Completed applications for this course are due to the Human Biology Program Office by September 1 for Academic year projects and May 1 for Summer projects. Please see the application on the Special Enrolment Courses page on the HMB Website.

 

Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Human Biology Program; please refer to the Human Biology Program website for more details
Exclusion: Students are not permitted to do a HMB research project concurrently with another research project
Distribution Requirements: Science

HMB499Y1 - Research Project in Human Biology II

A research project course for students enrolled in a Human Biology program, supervised by a faculty member appointed in a faculty or division at St. George Campus (Faculties of Arts & Science, Medicine, Engineering, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, etc.).

Students are responsible for securing their own supervisor. Should a HMB Specialist require help securing a supervisor, the request must be made by email to the Human Biology Program Office no later than July 20 for Academic year projects and January 30 for Summer projects.

Completed applications for this course are due to the Human Biology Program Office by September 1 for Academic year projects and May 1 for Summer projects. Please see the application on the Special Enrolment Courses page on the HMB Website.

Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: HMB496Y1, and permission of the program
Exclusion: Students are not permitted to do a HMB research project concurrently with another research project.
Distribution Requirements: Science

HPS302H1 - Topics in Philosophy of Science

Hours: 24L/10T

This course can concern topics of special interest in the philosophy of science from Antiquity until present. Topics may include scientific change, rationality, method, evidence, progress, reduction, scientific laws, models, representation etc. The course may also focus on specific-time periods, fields of inquiry, individuals, scientific institutions, geographic locations, etc.

Prerequisite: HPS250H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

HST330H1 - Population Health (formerly UNI330H1)

Hours: 24S

Extends students´ understanding of population-based strategies of health promotion in Canada. Topics include: variations in health status as affected by population patterns, class, gender, ethnicity, employment, and family composition; major causes of morbidity and mortality; the concept of "community health", opportunities and constraints facing public policy.

Prerequisite: HST209H1, HST250H1
Exclusion: UNI330H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

HST407H1 - Special Topics in Advanced Health Studies I

Hours: 24L

The specific content of this course will vary from one year to another, depending on the availability of particular health researchers and scholars. Specific course information will be available on the Health Studies website at www.uc.utoronto.ca/healthstudies/.

HST409H1 - Special Topics in Advanced Health Studies II

Hours: 24S

The specific content of this course will vary from one year to another, depending on the availability of particular health researchers and scholars. Specific course information will be available on the Health Studies website at www.uc.utoronto.ca/healthstudies/.

Exclusion: UNI409H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science

IMM428H1 - Molecular Immunology

Hours: 24L

This course will focus on the molecular and cellular biology of immune recognition. The course will emphasize historical and recent experimental evidence leading to our current understanding of immune recognition. Subtopics are subject to change and have recently included mechanisms of diversification of immunoglobulin receptors, T cell –MHC interactions, T cell activation and signaling mechanisms; receptors of the innate immune system, immune recognition by natural killer cells.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1, BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311H1/​ PSL350H1, IMM350H1/​ IMM351H1/​ IMM334Y1/​ IMM335Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

INI104H1 - Writing Reports

Hours: 36S

Introduces the fundamentals of report writing within an interdisciplinary context. This writing intensive course focuses on improving writing skills appropriate to report writing genres. Informal, formal, research, and professional workplace reports are examined in terms of purpose, audience, structure, style, persuasive strategies, and use of visual rhetoric (tables, charts, graphs). This course also examines qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

INI201H1 - Theories of Rhetoric

Hours: 36S

The history of rhetoric, the philosophical art of persuasion, is a complex one bound up with the histories of philosophy, literature, and religion, the rise and fall of empires, and the emergence of modern science and media technology. We will examine the development of rhetoric over time, from the roots of the discipline in classical antiquity to the genesis of modern and postmodern rhetoric, including the New Rhetoric. We will then focus on contemporary rhetorical currents in language philosophy, gender studies, critical race studies, and affect theory.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

INI303H1 - Digital Rhetoric

Hours: 36S

Examines the profound impact of digital media on contemporary culture and discourse. Students will explore recent currents in rhetoric and digital media. Students will investigate the rhetorical operation of digital media in domains ranging from academia to politics to popular culture. The class will analyze the role of rhetorical principles, such as persuasion and identification, in a diverse array of online discourse such as discussion forums, social media, and the blogosphere.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

INI333H1 - Critical Approaches in Urban Studies

Hours: 24L

How do power and dominance consolidate in urban settings? How do individuals and communities contest this consolidation, and claim spaces and rights in the city? These questions will be taken up through a range of critical approaches, including Indigenous, critical race feminist, political economy, queer, and anarchist perspectives. Students will have the opportunity to carry out interview-based research on an issue of equality and social justice that matters to them.

Prerequisite: INI235H1 and INI236H1
Recommended Preparation: None
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

INI339H1 - Divided City / United City

Hours: 24L

Focus on the impact of increased economic inequality and economic polarization trends that are reshaping Canada's metropolitan areas, changing neighbourhoods, and affecting the lives of our diverse urban population. Using the Toronto area as an example, students explore the consequences of these trends and the implications for public policy.

Prerequisite: A minimum of 8.0 FCEs
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

INI414H1 - Writing for Social Change

Hours: 36S

We will read and write a variety of texts focused on effecting social change. Students will be encouraged to engage with different theories of social change and an array of writing genres, ranging from journalism to critical theory to fiction. Ultimately, students will focus on one or several key social issues that they wish to write about for their final project.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

IRE332Y0 - Topics in Employment Relations (Summer Abroad Program)

Topics in Employment Relations offered in an international setting. The content may vary from year to year. For more information check the Summer Abroad website.

Exclusion: WDW332Y0
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

IRE379H1 - Employment Relations Research & Human Resource Analytics

Hours: 36L

An introduction to fundamental quantitative and qualitative research methods to enable students to critically evaluate and conduct research in the labour field. The class will explore data-driven, analytical approaches to managing human resources using basic metrics, analysis, and interpretation of information that link human resource initiatives to various indicators of organizational performance.

Prerequisite: IRE240H1/​ IRE244H1/​ IRE260H1
Exclusion: WDW379H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

ITA233H1 - Italian-Canadian Literature (formerly ITA233Y1)

Hours: 24L

The course will explore how notions of identity and (self)-representation emerge in literature by Canadian writers of Italian descent, illustrating the critical evolution of the immigrant journey from its historical experience to its current condition. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience. (Given in English)

Exclusion: ITA233Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JAL353H1 - Conversational Structures

Hours: 36L

Conversational Structures in an introduction to the detailed observation of ordinary conversational interaction, and to some of the main ways in which such interaction is organized. The focus is on developing the capacity to discern orderliness in the details of everyday interaction, and beginning independent research in this area. (Given by the Departments of Anthropology and Linguistics). Not offered every year.

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1/​ LIN200H1/​ ANT253H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

JAL401H1 - Field Linguistics

Hours: 48P

Field Linguistics provides practice in language analysis based on elicited data from a native speaker of an indigenous or foreign language, emphasizing procedures and techniques. (Given by the Departments of Anthropology and Linguistics)

Prerequisite: Completion of LIN322H1 and LIN331H1 or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: LIND46H3
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

JDC400Y1 - Redefining Security through Art

Hours: 48L/48T

Articulates a cultural approach to achieving Human Security. This course examines human security issues in which there is a significant cultural dimension to a security threat, and in which culture occupies an essential place in any realistic and effective solution. The work of artists to be analyzed include: Ariane Mnouchkine; Robert Lepage; Bertolt Brecht; John Greyson, Mohsen Makhmalbaf, Terry George and Daniel Barenboim.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE, Specialist or Major in Drama and permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JDC410H1 - Arts and Politics: Bertolt Brecht, Robert Lepage, Robert Wilson

Hours: 36L

Bertolt Brecht played a specific role in the paradigm shift of the art which began at the end of the 19th century. He advanced this change by trying to connect art to its social and political functions and structure with the positive acceptance of the industrial revolution and by trying to transform it with the help of the new technological media.

Prerequisite: 14 FCE, Specialist or Major in Drama and permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

JEG100H1 - Introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Science

Hours: 24L/12P

This introduction to Physical Geography and Earth Sciences examines the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and biosphere, emphasizing processes, flows of energy and materials, and the interconnectedness of these Earth systems. Specific topics include weather and climate, earth materials, geological and geomorphic processes involved in the genesis of landforms, river systems, glaciers, soils, and biomes. Six laboratory meetings during the term.

Exclusion: GGR100H1, ESS102H1, ESS262H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

JHA410H1 - Clinical Neuroimaging

Hours: 24L/12T

This course focuses on the use of neuroimaging techniques in understanding how trauma, disorders, and disease impact neural structure and function. Lectures will focus on local and long-range neural impact of pathology and neuroimaging assessment. Lab work will focus on practical skills including image processing, analyses, and experimental design.

Prerequisite: 9 FCE complete, PSL300H1, BIO230H1, HMB200H1/​ PSY290H1/​ ANA300Y1
Recommended Preparation: HMB320H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

JLP315H1 - Language Acquisition

Hours: 36L

Infants’ abilities at birth, prelinguistic development, the first words, phonological, syntactic and semantic development. Social variables influencing language acquisition, bilingualism, models of development, language play. (Sponsored by the Departments of Linguistics and Psychology, but administered solely by the Dept. of Linguistics).

Prerequisite: One full course equivalent at the 200+-level in LIN/JAL/JUP/PSL/PSY/COG
Exclusion: PSY315H5, PLIC24H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

JLP374H1 - Psychology of Language

Hours: 36L

In Psychology of Language, we investigate human and other animal communication, structure of human language, word meaning and semantic memory, psychological studies of syntax, bilingualism, language and thought, language errors and disorders. (Sponsored by the Departments of Linguistics and Psychology, but administered solely by the Dept. of Linguistics).

Prerequisite: One FCE from LIN228H1, LIN229H1, LIN232H1, LIN241H1, PSY260H1, PSY270H1, PSY280H1, PSY290H1, COG250Y1
Exclusion: LIN258H5, PSY374H5, PLIC55H3
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

JLS472H1 - Child Language Disorders

Hours: 36L

Students are introduced to the etiologies and characteristics of speech and language disorders in children, associated with autism, intellectual disabilities, and specific language impairment. Theoretical underpinnings of the major intervention approaches for children with speech and language disorders are discussed. (Given by the Departments of Linguistics and Speech Language Pathology)

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1, LIN228H1, and 1 FCE at the 300+ level
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

JLS475H1 - Literacy and Reading Disorders

Hours: 36L

Literacy and Reading Disorders is an introduction to the typical development of emergent literacy skills, including oral language, phonological awareness, narratives, and emergent writing in children; a discussion of the effects of language disorders on emergent literacy skills; a survey of approaches to intervention for children’s emergent literacy skills. (Given by the Departments of Linguistics and Speech Language Pathology)

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1, and one FCE at the 300+ level
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

JLS476H1 - Linguistics in the Workforce: Clinical Practice and Research

Hours: 36S

This course exposes students to research and practical approaches in the context of health professions of relevance to linguistics students, especially audiology and speech-language pathology. Students learn about evidence-informed practice, research methodologies, practice approaches and theories in the health professions. Students will be poised to benefit from optional service learning placements during or following the course, in research laboratories or clinical settings. Successful completion of this course provides students with exposure and experience of use in their applications to audiology, speech-language pathology, and other clinical programs and in their future health or graduate studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1, and one FCE at the 200+ level
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

JPA376Y0 - Transforming Global Politics: Comparative and Chinese Perspectives

Previous Course Number: POL376Y1
Hours: 48L

Set against the backdrop of the rise of China, this course examines the dynamics of global change from comparative and Chinese perspectives. Themes include international security, political economy, political development and democracy, global climate change, economic development, poverty and inequality, corruption, technology innovation, among others. (Given by the Department of Political Science and the Contemporary Asian Studies Program)

Prerequisite: POL101Y1/​ POL208Y1/​ POL208Y5/​( POLB80H3, POLB81H3)/ POL215Y1/​ POL224Y1/​ CAS200Y1
Exclusion: POL376Y1/​ POL376Y0
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

JSU325H1 - Queerly Canadian (formerly UNI325H1)

Hours: 36L

This course focuses on Canadian literary and artistic productions that challenge prevailing notions of nationality and sexuality, exploring not only how artists struggle with that ongoing Canadian thematic of being and belonging, but also celebrate pleasure and desire as a way of imagining and articulating an alternative national politics.

Prerequisite: SDS255H1/​ SDS256H1/​ CDN2671 (formerly UNI267H1)/ CDN268H1 (formerly UNI268H1) or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: SDS375H1 Special Topics: Queerly Canadian, UNI325H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

LIN101H1 - Introduction to Linguistics: Sound Structure

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to fundamental principles of linguistics with particular attention to sound structure and its acquisition, processing, and variation; practice in elementary analytic techniques using data from a broad spectrum of languages.

Exclusion: LIN100Y1, LIN101H5, LINA01H3, LINA02H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN102H1 - Introduction to Linguistics: Sentence Structure and Meaning

Hours: 24L/12P

Introduction to fundamental principles of linguistics with particular attention to sentence and meaning structure, their acquisition, processing, and variation; practice in elementary analytic techniques using data from a broad spectrum of languages.

Exclusion: LIN100Y1, LIN102H5, LINA01H3, LINA02H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN200H1 - Introduction to Language

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to Language is a general-interest course on language. Possible topics include: the structure of language; how language changes over time, the social and psychological aspects of language, language and culture, the origin of language, writing systems, and language acquisition. (This course cannot be used as an entrance to programs in linguistics, and cannot be used as a prerequisite to any linguistics courses unless otherwise indicated.)

Exclusion: LIN101H1, LIN102H1, LIN101H5, LIN102H5, LINA01H3, LINA02H3, ANT253H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN201H1 - Canadian English

Hours: 24L

A study of English spoken in Canada. Topics include: vocabulary items, usage surveys, non-standard dialect enclaves, regional variation and historical development. Students will develop original research projects in linguistics.

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1/​ LIN200H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN203H1 - English Words

Hours: 24L/12T

English has a rich vocabulary. We will learn how it has developed over time, and investigate aspects of the meaning and pronunciation of words. Most of all, we will study how words are put together, so that students will be able to recognize and analyze unfamiliar words.

Exclusion: LIN203H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN204H1 - English Grammar

Hours: 24L/12T

How the English language works: students analyze a wide variety of English grammatical structures and learn how they vary across dialects and change through time.

Exclusion: LIN204H5, LINB18H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN228H1 - Phonetics

Hours: 24L/12T

Phonetics is a linguistics course that investigates the sounds most commonly used in languages from an articulatory and acoustic point of view, with practice in their recognition and production. Students will learn the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and practice transcribing a wide variety of speech sounds.

Exclusion: LIN228H5, LINB09H3
Recommended Preparation: LIN101H1/​ LIN200H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN229H1 - Sound Patterns in Language

Hours: 24L/12T

The nature and organization of phonological systems, with practical work in linguistic analysis.

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN228H1
Exclusion: LIN229H5, LINB04H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN232H1 - Syntactic Patterns in Language

Hours: 24L/12T

The nature and organization of syntactic systems; their relation to semantic systems and the linguistic organization of discourse; practical work in linguistic analysis.

Prerequisite: LIN102H1
Exclusion: LIN232H5, LINB06H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN241H1 - Introduction to Semantics

Hours: 24L/12T

An introduction to meaning within linguistics and the interpretation of language in context. Topics include logical and semantic relations, pragmatic concepts such as presupposition and implicature, the nature of thematic roles, quantifiers and scope relations, the expressions of temporal and modal relations in natural language.

Prerequisite: LIN102H1
Exclusion: LIN247H5, LINC12H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN251H1 - Introduction to Sociolinguistics

Hours: 24L/12T

How does linguistic variation construct identity? Introduction to recent sociolinguistic literature on language contact, multilingualism, code-switching, expressions of ethnic solidarity and regional identity, sex and gender differentiation, dialect geography, sociophonetics, perceptual dialectology, diffusion of norms in mobile populations, documentation of variation in lesser studied languages, and changes across the life-span.

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1
Exclusion: LIN256H5, LINB20H3
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN299Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project in linguistics. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rop. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Social Science

LIN306H1 - Language Diversity and Language Universals

Hours: 24L

This linguistics course examines cross-linguistic typological features found in the languages of the world. Special attention is given to describing morphological and syntactic patterns found cross-linguistically. The goal of the course is to draw on the diversity of languages in order to uncover language universals. (Not offered every year)

Prerequisite: LIN232H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN322H1 - Phonological Theory

Hours: 36L

Basic issues in current phonological theory. Problems focusing on analysis and theory. (Students who want to pursue graduate studies in linguistics are strongly advised to include this course in their program.)

Prerequisite: LIN229H1
Exclusion: LIN322H5, LINC02H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN323H1 - Acoustic Phonetics

Hours: 24L

This linguistics course is an introduction to the acoustic phonetics of the vocal tract, including acoustic properties of speech and its analysis using instrumental techniques.

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1, LIN228H1
Exclusion: LIN328H5
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

LIN331H1 - Syntactic Theory

Hours: 36L

An introduction to the foundations and formal framework of current generative syntax, concentrating on Chomsky's Minimalist theory. (Students who want to pursue graduate studies in linguistics are strongly advised to include this course in their program.)

Prerequisite: LIN232H1
Exclusion: LIN331H5, LINC11H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN333H1 - Morphological Patterns in Language

Hours: 36L

The nature and organization of morphological systems, with practical work in linguistic analysis.

Prerequisite: LIN229H1, LIN232H1
Exclusion: LIN231H1, LIN231H5, LINB10H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN341H1 - Semantic Theory

Hours: 36L

This linguistics course focuses on the study of natural language semantics and the relation between interpretation and syntactic structure. Topics include predication and quantification, scope and anaphora, problems of discourse analysis, the interpretation of different types of pronouns, and ellipsis.

Prerequisite: LIN241H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN351H1 - Sociolinguistic Patterns in Language

Hours: 24L/12T

In this sociolinguistics course, we explore linguistic variation and its social implications, especially the quantitative study of phonological and grammatical features and their correlations with age, sex, ethnicity, and other social variables.

Prerequisite: LIN251H1, or permission of the instructor
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

LIN362H1 - Historical Linguistics

Hours: 36L

An introduction to diachronic linguistics. Theories of language change; the comparative method, internal reconstruction, linguistic geography, the origin of languages; language death.

Prerequisite: LIN229H1
Exclusion: LIN360H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN398H0 - Research Excursions

An instructor-supervised group linguistics project in an off-campus setting. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/399. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities

LIN399Y1 - Research Opportunity Program

Credit course for supervised participation in faculty research project in linguistics. Details at http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/course/rop. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

LIN409H1 - Structure of a Specific Language

Hours: 24L

Topics may include: the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic systems; the writing system; a brief diachronic sketch; linguistic variation and sociolinguistic aspects. (Not offered every year).

Prerequisite: LIN228H1, LIN229H1, LIN232H1 + 1 FCE at THE 300+ level in LIN/JAL/JFL/JLP/JLS
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN432H1 - Advanced Morphology

Hours: 24L

Current research involving morphology, including the role of morphology in the grammar, the nature of inflectional paradigms, affixes affecting grammatical relations constitute this linguistics course. Each year one topic will be a special focus and will be dealt with at length. (Not offered every year)

Prerequisite: LIN333H1
Corequisite: LIN331H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN439H1 - Research in Syntax

Hours: 24S

Research in Syntactic Theory, including guided instruction in how to undertake critical reading of primary literature, develop an original topic, write a linguistics research paper, an abstract, a handout, and give an oral presentation. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. (Not offered every year)

Prerequisite: LIN331H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN441H1 - Intensional Semantics

Hours: 24L

This linguistics course covers topics in intensional semantics, including formal semantics of tense, aspect, modality, and attitude verbs. (Not offered every year)

Prerequisite: LIN341H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN458H1 - Revitalizing Languages

Hours: 24L

A study of language endangerment and language revitalization efforts, focusing on Aboriginal languages of Canada. Topics include language classification and a survey of major features of the languages, what it means for a language to be endangered, the factors that contribute to language shift, and efforts to reverse language shift, including discussion of literacy, documentary linguistics and dictionaries.

Prerequisite: LIN101H1, LIN102H1 plus 2 FCE at the 200+ level in LIN/JAL
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

LIN481H1 - Introduction to Analysis and Argumentation

Hours: 36L

Linguistic argumentation, practice in constructing and evaluating hypotheses, and critical evaluation of representative articles. Emphasis on the structure of arguments rather than on the analysis of a particular language.

Prerequisite: LIN322H1/​ LIN331H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

LIN495Y1 - Individual Project

A research or reading project in linguistics undertaken by the student under the supervision of a staff member. Open only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department

LIN496H1 - Individual Project

A research or reading project in linguistics undertaken by the student under the supervision of a staff member. Open only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

LIN497Y1 - Individual Project

A research or reading project in linguistics undertaken by the student under the supervision of a staff member. Open only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

LIN498H1 - Individual Project

A research or reading project in linguistics undertaken by the student under the supervision of a staff member. Open only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

LIN499H1 - Individual Project

A research or reading project in linguistics undertaken by the student under the supervision of a staff member. Open only when a faculty member is willing and available to supervise. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Department
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science

LMP410H1 - Pathobiology of Neurodegenerative Disease

Hours: 24L

Molecular basis of neurodegenerative diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Emphasis on the molecular pathobiology of neurodegenerative diseases, current research developments and guidance with writing of research proposals. Mid-term and final exams will practice assembly of a succinct research proposal and query neurodegenerative disease material taught in course.

Prerequisite: BCH311H1/​( PSL300H1, PSL301H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

LMP436H1 - Microbial Pathogenesis

Hours: 36L

Molecular mechanism involved in pathogenesis of infectious disease. Topics include recurrent themes in the establishment of infectious disease, such as adherence and spread of pathogenic bacteria as well as evasion of host defences. Emphasis is placed on genetic characterization and expression of virulence determinants and on interactions between bacterial pathogens and their hosts.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1, ( IMM340H1, IMM350H1)/( IMM341H1, IMM351H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MAT157Y1 - Analysis I

Hours: 72L/48T

A theoretical course in calculus; emphasizing proofs and techniques, as well as geometric and physical understanding. Trigonometric identities. Limits and continuity; least upper bounds, intermediate and extreme value theorems. Derivatives, mean value and inverse function theorems. Integrals; fundamental theorem; elementary transcendental functions. Techniques of integration. Taylor's theorem; sequences and series; uniform convergence and power series.

Prerequisite: High school level calculus
Exclusion: MAT137Y1, MATA37H3, MAT137Y5, MAT195H1, & MAT197H1
Recommended Preparation: Students should consider taking the Preparing for University Math Level II in order to prepare in advance for MAT157Y1. Students may also take MAT138H1 concurrently with MAT157Y1. Students will receive credit for both MAT157Y1 and MAT138H1 if MAT138H1 is taken before or along with MAT157Y1.
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT257Y1 - Analysis II

Hours: 72L/48T

Topology of R^n; compactness, functions and continuity, extreme value theorem. Derivatives; inverse and implicit function theorems, maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Integration; Fubini's theorem, partitions of unity, change of variables. Differential forms. Manifolds in R^n; integration on manifolds; Stokes' theorem for differential forms and classical versions.

Prerequisite: MAT157Y1, MAT247H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT327H1 - Introduction to Topology

Hours: 36L

Metric spaces, topological spaces and continuous mappings; separation, compactness, connectedness. Fundamental group and covering spaces. Brouwer fixed-point theorem. Students in the math specialist program wishing to take additional topology courses are advised to obtain permission to take MAT1300H,MAT1301H.

Prerequisite: MAT157Y1/​( MAT237Y1, MAT246H1 and permission of the instructor).
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT347Y1 - Groups, Rings and Fields

Hours: 72L/24T

Groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Sylow theorems, Jordan-Hölder theorem, finitely generated abelian groups, solvable groups. Rings, ideals, Chinese remainder theorem; Euclidean domains and principal ideal domains: unique factorization. Noetherian rings, Hilbert basis theorem. Finitely generated modules. Field extensions, algebraic closure, straight-edge and compass constructions. Galois theory, including insolvability of the quintic.

Prerequisite: MAT257Y1/​(85% in MAT247H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MAT351Y1 - Partial Differential Equations

Hours: 72L

This is a first course in Partial Differential Equations, intended for Mathematics students with interests in analysis, mathematical physics, geometry, and optimization. The examples to be discussed include first-order equations, harmonic functions, the diffusion equation, the wave equation, Schrodinger's equation, and eigenvalue problems. In addition to the classical representation formulas for the solutions of these equations, there are techniques that apply more broadly: the notion of well-posedness, the method of characteristics, energy methods, maximum and comparison principles, fundamental solutions, Green's functions, Duhamel's principle, Fourier series, the min-max characterization of eigenvalues, Bessel functions, spherical harmonics, and distributions. Nonlinear phenomena such as shock waves and solitary waves are also introduced.

Prerequisite: MAT257Y1/​85% in MAT237Y1, MAT267H1
Exclusion: APM351Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)

MGY200H1 - An Introduction to Molecular Genetics and Microbiology

Hours: 24L

Introduction to the core concepts of genetics and microbiology. Included are also topical biological problems and cutting-edge scientific approaches with some examples from world-class Toronto labs. Historical context is often used to deliver material. Topics include: core concepts in genetics, an introduction to cancer and stem cells; the genetic regulation of aging; core concepts in microbiology; emerging and recurring microbial threats; genetic engineering.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY311Y1 - Molecular Biology

Hours: 72L

This course examines the design and interpretation of experiments that have led to our current understanding of the biological roles of DNA, RNA and proteins. Intended for students considering graduate or professional work in molecular biology or a related field or wanting a deeper understanding of these topics.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BCH242Y1 (Note: BCH210H1 may be acceptable with permission of instructor)
Exclusion: BCH311H1, CSB349H1, JBC372H5(UTM), PSL350H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY314H1 - Principles of Genetic Analysis I

Hours: 12T/36P

Laboratory experiments in genetics, with the focus on microbial and prokaryotic genetics. Topics and experiments include mutagenesis and genetic selection, linkage and recombination, genetic crosses, gene regulation, suppressor analyses, and genetic mapping. (Lab fee: $25)

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Exclusion: MGY312H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY315H1 - Principles of Genetic Analysis II

Hours: 12T/36P

Laboratory experiments in eukaryotic genetics, using two of the most powerful eukaryotic model systems, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The course follows MGY314H1; topics include analysis of genetic networks and pathways, meiotic segregation analysis, recombination mapping, genetic crosses, and phenotypic analyses. (Lab fee: $25)

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1, MGY314H1/​ MGY340H1
Exclusion: MGY312H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY340H1 - Molecular Genetics

Hours: 36L

This course gives students an in-depth understanding of how genetics, the study of mutations and their resulting phenotypes, are used to probe and understand a variety of biological phenomena ranging from metabolism, to development, to cancer.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY350H1 - Model Organisms to Disease

Hours: 36L

The concepts of genetics in the context of human development, disease and evolution. Topics include genetic interactions and complex traits, variation in disease phenotype, signalling and development, stem cells and epigenetic regulation.

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Corequisite: BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY360H1 - Whole-Genome Sequencing and Analysis Laboratory

Hours: 36P

The principles and practice of whole-genome sequencing. Each student team will sequence an entire eukaryotic genome and analyze it. Topics will include: modern sequencing technology, yeast husbandry, genomic library construction and quality control, ‘next-generation’ sequencing, sequence assembly using a reference genome, principles of genome organization, mutation detection and interpretation.

Prerequisite: BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY377H1 - Microbiology I: Bacteria

Hours: 36L

An in depth study of bacteria including their structure, their biology, their ability to adapt, and their effects on human health. Provides a foundation for advanced studies in bacterial physiology, bacterial genetics, molecular pathogenesis of disease, immunology, and environmental studies.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1, BIO120H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1
Exclusion: BIO370Y5 (UTM)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY378H1 - Microbiology II: Viruses

Hours: 36L

Detailed study of viruses in terms of structure, classification, replication and interaction with the host. Basis for advanced study in virology. Requires some familiarity with molecular and cellular biology. A concurrent course in immunology (IMM340H1, IMM350H1) or (IMM341H1, IMM351H1) is recommended.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1; BIO120H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1; BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Corequisite: BCH311H1/​ CSB349H1/​ MGY311Y1
Exclusion: BIO351Y1, CSB351Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY379Y1 - Microbiology Laboratory

Hours: 24L/72P

Laboratory experiments will teach important concepts and provide students with hands-on experience in working safely with medically-important bacteria and viruses. Analysis of the results will help to develop skills in data analysis. Valuable not only for advanced work in microbiology but also in related fields that make use of bacteria and viruses as research tools. Topics include molecular techniques for identification and characterization of bacteria and viruses, biofilms, antibiotic resistance, site-directed mutagenesis, communication of bacteria with each other and their environment, propagation and assay of viruses, host response to infection, viral vectors. (Lab fee: $50)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO230H1/​ BIO255H1, BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1
Corequisite: MGY377H1, MGY378H1
Exclusion: MGY376H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MGY428H1 - Functional Genomics

Hours: 24L

A broad-ranging course that covers many aspects of genomics and functional genomics, which is the discipline of defining and attributing function to all of the heritable material of an organism on a genome-wide scale, as applied to invertebrates and vertebrates. The primary and review literature will be the basis of all lectures.

Prerequisite: BCH210H1/​ BCH242Y1; BIO260H1/​ HMB265H1; MGY311Y1/​ CSB349H1/​ BCH311H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MIJ485H1 - Vaccines and Immunity

Hours: 36L

Analysis of the strategies used by pathogenic microbes to evade specific and innate immune responses, and the strategies used to combat infectious disease using vaccines, with an emphasis on molecular and immunological aspects. Special topics include: molecular basis of pathogenicity and immune-evasion strategies; vaccination strategies; challenges to vaccine implementation (given jointly by the Departments of Molecular Genetics and Immunology).

Prerequisite: ( IMM340H1/​ IMM341H1), ( IMM350H1/​ IMM351H1), MGY377H1, MGY378H1
Exclusion: MBY480H1, MGY485H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

MST201H1 - Getting Medieval: Myths and Monsters

Hours: 24L/12T

Introduction to the sound, sight, and touch of the distant past, telling the story of the Middle Ages through objects from animal skin parchment to enameled icon. Lectures are complemented by hands-on learning in weekly tutorials featuring text- and narrative-oriented digital methods, along with medieval drama and music performance.

Prerequisite: None
Exclusion: MST200Y1
Recommended Preparation: N/A
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MUS120Y1 - Vocal and Instrumental Ensembles I

Hours: 144P

Students rehearse and perform in concerts and reading sessions as assigned by the Faculty of Music. Provides experience in choral groups, orchestra, or in concert band and large wind groups of diverse instrumentation. Development of musicianship skills through performance of large ensemble works; emphasis on sight-reading, ear-training, and musical knowledge.

Attendance at all sessions is required. Placement audition and permission of the Department required. Download the excerpt that is relevant to the instrument you would like to audition on; excerpts will be available at www.music.utoronto.ca beginning early July. Complete and return the MUS120Y1 & MUS220Y1 Audition Request Form before August 17, 2018.

Once your request form is received, you will be notified of your audition time. Placement audition will be held on September 4, 5 or 6, 2018 in the Edward Johnson Building. The audition will be 10 minutes in length.

Exclusion: MUS291Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

MUS220Y1 - Vocal and Instrumental Ensembles II

Hours: 144P

Students rehearse and perform in concerts and reading sessions as assigned by the Faculty of Music. Provides experience in choral groups, orchestra, or in concert band and large wind groups of diverse instrumentation. Development of musicianship skills through performance of large ensemble works; emphasis on sight-reading, ear-training, and musical knowledge. Attendance at all sessions is required. Placement audition and permission of the Department required. Download the excerpt that is relevant to the instrument you would like to audition on; excerpts will be available at www.music.utoronto.ca beginning early July. Complete and return the MUS120Y1 & MUS220Y1 Audition Request Form before August 17, 2018. Once your request form is received, you will be notified of your audition time. Placement audition will be held on September 4,5 or 6, 2018 in the Edward Johnson Building. The audition will be 10 minutes in length.

Prerequisite: MUS120Y1. Placement audition and permission of the Department required.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NEW102H1 - Language and Diversity I

Hours: 12L/24S

Exploring key themes and different kinds of knowledge implied by the notion of "learning without borders", this interdisciplinary course looks at the place of language in connecting and dividing people, places and communities. Defining language broadly, it makes connections with other New One topics, and explores students' own language experience in relation to global forces.

Prerequisite: Admission to New One
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW101H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW112H1 - Language and Diversity II

Hours: 12L/24S

Building on the integrated learning from any New One I course, this course considers various language issues that arise as people migrate around the globe, including the relationship of language and culture, the question of language preservation, the politics of minority and global languages, language policy and norms, disability and diverse ways of communicating.

Prerequisite: NEW101H1/​ NEW102H1/​ NEW103H1/​ NEW104H1/​ NEW105H1/​Permission of the New One Coordinator
Exclusion: INI/Munk/SMC/TRN/UNI/VIC/WDW One; NEW111H1/​ NEW113H1/​ NEW114H1/​ NEW115H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW214H1 - Socially Engaged Buddhism (formerly NEW214Y1)

Hours: 24L

A comprehensive survey of socially engaged Buddhism. Particular focus on contemporary movements in Vietnam, Tibet, China & Taiwan, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and India.

Exclusion: NEW214Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW232Y1 - Buddhist Psychology

Hours: 72L

Describes the psychology inherent within the teachings of Buddhism. Primary focus is placed on the understanding of the nature of suffering, consciousness, cognition and emotion, characteristics of self, psychological contextualism, personality transformation, unconscious influences, and mindfulness meditation. Includes an option for Service Learning experience.

Exclusion: NEW402Y1, NEW432Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NEW449H1 - Contemporary Theories in Disability Studies

Hours: 24S

Explores the influence of contemporary social theory in the formation of Disability Studies and its contemporary expressions. Examines how contemporary feminist theory, queer theory, and post-colonial theory intersect with Disability Studies to develop an understanding of disability as a socio-political phenomenon.

Prerequisite: NEW240Y1 and 0.5 FCE from Equity Studies Core Group: Disability Studies
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW495Y1 - Independent Community Engaged Learning

Hours: 96P/24S

A placement-based course in which students develop knowledge, practice and professional skills appropriate to the social purpose sector while working to support programming for community partners. The accompanying seminar considers social justice issues and models community-engagement practice, supporting students’ experiential, participatory and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Recommended Preparation: NEW120Y1/​ NEW150Y1/​ NEW220H1/​ NEW221H1/​ NEW224Y1/​ NEW225H1/​ NEW226H1/​ NEW232Y1/​ NEW240Y1/​ NEW241Y1/​ NEW270H1/​ HIS230H1/​ HIS231H1/​other NEW courses
Distribution Requirements: Humanities; Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NEW497Y1 - Independent Community Engaged Research

Hours: 96P/24S

A placement-based course in which students gain experience and develop social research and professional skills working on projects initiated by community partners. The accompanying seminar reviews conventional and creative interdisciplinary research methodologies relevant to the social purpose sector while supporting students’ participatory- and reflective learning. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 9.0 FCE and successful completion of the application process.
Recommended Preparation: NEW120Y1/​ NEW150Y1/​ NEW220H1/​ NEW221H1/​ NEW224Y1/​ NEW225H1/​ NEW226H1/​ NEW232Y1/​ NEW240Y1/​ NEW241Y1/​ NEW270H1/​ HIS230H1/​ HIS231H1/​ other NEW courses
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC101H1 - Land of the Pharaohs

Hours: 24L/12T

The course traces the history of ancient Egypt from the foundation of the Egyptian state around 3050 BCE to its incorporation into the Roman Empire. The focus is on various aspects of Egyptian culture, including the institution of kingship, the role of women, and the peculiarities of Egyptian art, literature, and religion. Emphasis is placed on the methods by which knowledge about this ancient civilization can be obtained.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC102H1 - Heartland of Ancient Empires

Hours: 24L/12T

From city state to empire. The peoples and polities of Mesopotamia and the Near East, including Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians. Their cultural contributions, from the development of writing to their achievements in law, administration, science, art and architecture, religion, and literature.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC103H1 - The Islamic World

Hours: 24L/12T

Study the history, lands, peoples, religions, and cultures that came under the influence of Islam and in turn, contributed to the formation of Islamic civilization. Topics covered include an overview of the geographical and ethno-linguistic scope of the Islamic world, the role of the Qur’an and Arabic language, the major Islamic empires, the production and transmission of knowledge, law and society, literary and artistic expressions, and modern developments.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC104H1 - The Biblical World

Hours: 24L/12T

Examine the history, lands, peoples, religions, literatures and cultures that produced the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Topics to be covered include an overview of the geography and history of Ancient Israel and Judea, the role of the Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek languages, the literary genres reflected in biblical and some contemporary non-biblical texts, and the scholarly methods by which the Bible is studied.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC246H1 - Sumerian and Babylonian Literature in Translation

Hours: 24L

This course explores some of the world’s oldest literature, including the Epic of Gilgamesh and the Babylonian Epic of Creation. It surveys the major genres from ancient Mesopotamia, including epics, myths, lyrical poetry, wisdom literature, and humorous tales.

Recommended Preparation: NMC102H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC251H1 - Voices from Ancient Egypt

Hours: 24L

Introduces students to the culture of ancient Egypt through the study of 'functional' textual materials, including domestic, religious (including funerary and ritual), historical, and scientific texts, to paint a rich picture of the daily life and experiences of the ancient Egyptians. No knowledge of Egyptian required; all texts read in translation.

Recommended Preparation: NMC101H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC253H1 - Egyptian Myths

Hours: 24L

Explores Egyptian mythical writings, starting with the myths contained in the Pyramid Texts of the 3rd Millennium BCE and ending with the narrative mythical tales of the 1st Millennium BCE and beyond. Definitions and historical developments will be discussed. All texts will be read in translation.

Recommended Preparation: NMC101H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC254H1 - The Mummy: Technology and Transformation

Hours: 24L

This course explores the significance of mummies in contexts ranging from ancient Egyptian to modern, tracing the development of Egyptian mummification techniques and the roles and uses of mummies as transformative elements allowing access to the afterlife, sources of information about ancient individuals, characters in literature and film, and objects for display in museums.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NMC255H1 - Love, Battle, and Wit: Classics of Premodern Arabic Literature

Hours: 24L

Students read closely classic works in translation, through class discussion, in-class exercises, and short essays. Readings include: narratives like Kalila wa-Dimna and Ibn Hazm's love treatise; poems by Labid, Jarir, Abu Nuwas, al-Mutanabbi, and Ibn Nubata; and an obscene shadow play by Ibn Daniyal.

Recommended Preparation: 1 FCE in Humanities.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC256H1 - 1001 Nights Around the World

Hours: 24L

Reveals how the 1001 Nights was created, transformed, and disseminated. We consider the politics and aesthetics of medieval and modern adaptations - manuscripts, films, ballet, novels, and short stories produced around the world. Builds toward a final project -- either a creative project or an essay.

Recommended Preparation: 1 FCE in Humanities
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC260H1 - Why the Ancient Near East? Investigating the Great Transformations in Pre- and Proto- History

Hours: 36L

Explore the great transformations in human existence that took place first in the Ancient Near East and Egypt: the origins of farming, writing, the city and the state. We will learn how to recover, process, interpret, and communicate relevant archaeological data, asking why here? Why then?

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC262H1 - Why the Ancient Near East? The Historic Periods

Hours: 36L

From 2500 to 333 BCE, the ancient Near East saw the world’s first empire, the birth of international diplomacy, burgeoning sea-trade and piracy, perennial warfare and the emergence of new ethnic identities like the Philistines and Israelites. Explore the archaeological evidence for these events in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Anatolia and the Levant.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC273Y1 - Early Islamic History: The Prophet and the Caliphates

Hours: 72L

Builds a solid foundation in Middle East & Islamic Studies, giving students an understanding of major themes and events, movements and individuals in early Islamic history and an awareness of the tools and sources available for study, problems historians have encountered in using them, and interpretive approaches to these sources.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC274H1 - The Rise of the Turks: From Nomads of the Steppe Frontier to Islamic Rulers

Hours: 24L

Explores the roles of Turks as raiders, migrants, slave-soldiers, and empire-builders in the formation of the Islamic world prior to the Ottomans (1300). Readings include primary sources in translation on the Islamization of the Turks in Central Asia and their gradual takeover of Iranian and Arab lands.

Exclusion: NMC274Y1
Recommended Preparation: NMC103H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC278H1 - Introduction to the Modern Middle East

Hours: 36L

The emergence of modern states in the Middle East, against a background of empire, world wars, and national and religious movements. Students will learn why the modern map looks the way it does, and how Middle Eastern peoples' self-identifications have changed over the past 200 years.

Recommended Preparation: NMC103H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC343H1 - Farmers to Pyramid Builders: Cultural and Political History of Ancient Egypt I

Hours: 24L/12T

Exploration of the primary archaeological, architectural, and inscriptional sources, questioning and analyzing ideas about Egypt's development from farming communities at the dawn of history to an early state that built great pyramids for its kings, collapsed into civil war, and grew to become a colonizing power in the Middle Kingdom.

Prerequisite: 5 FCE in any field or 1 FCE in NMC
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC344H1 - Hyksos Subjects to Empire Builders: Cultural and Political History of Ancient Egypt II

Hours: 24L/12T

Exploration of the primary archaeological, architectural, and inscriptional sources, questioning interpretations and analyzing how Egypt confronted foreign domination and developed into a major empire in the New Kingdom under Thutmose III, Hatshepsut, Akhenaten, and Ramesses II, then fragmented politically in the Third Intermediate Period and ultimately became a colony itself.

Prerequisite: 5 FCE in any field or 1 FCE in NMC
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC347H1 - Ancient Mesopotamia II: Assyrians and Babylonians

Hours: 24L

Traces the political development and cultural history of Mesopotamia, from the territorial states of the Late Bronze Age to the world’s first empires in the first millennium BC (Assyria, Babylonia, Achaemenid Persia).

Prerequisite: 3 FCE in Humanities.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC348Y1 - History of Iran: From the Sasanians to the Safavids

Hours: 48L

Examines the political history and cultural legacy of the Sasanian empire and transmission of Persian concepts of kingship, administration, and social organization into Islamic civilization, Perso-Islamic cultural synthesis under the Samanids, the interaction between nomadic and sedentary cultures under the rule of Turkic and Turko-Mongolian dynasties, and the Safavid state.

Prerequisite: Any course in the history of the ancient or early Islamic world.
Recommended Preparation: NMC273Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC352H1 - Ancient Egyptian Literature

Hours: 24L

Focuses on analysis of examples of the different genres of ancient Egyptian literary texts, including wisdom literature, poetry, literary narratives, and mythical tales. We question how to define literature and discuss how literary texts developed in pharaonic Egypt. No knowledge of ancient Egyptian is required; all texts read in translation.

Prerequisite: Any H course (0.5 FCE) on ancient Egypt
Recommended Preparation: NMC101H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC353H1 - Possible Worlds: Arabic Speculative Fiction

Hours: 24S

Arabic speculative fiction from the medieval to the modern period, discussed with attention to early Arabic novel’s adaptation of the medieval maqama genre, and the relation between speculative fiction and political and social critique. Texts include al-Ma`arri, Ibn Shuhayd, maqamat, al-Muwaylihi, science fiction, and dystopic novels and conceptual art.

Prerequisite: 4 FCE in Humanities
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC364H1 - The Art and Archaeology of Syria

Hours: 48S

Integrally connected with the Levant, Anatolia and Mesopotamia, Syria nevertheless boasts its own unparalleled cultural heritage. This class investigates key elements of that heritage from 5000 to 333 BCE.

Prerequisite: 3 FCE in any field
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC374H1 - The Mamluks: from Slaves to Sultans

Hours: 24L

Engages with fundamental themes of Islamic civilization that played out in the Mamluk sultanate of Egypt and Syria: slavery, plague, the role of women, military patronage, global trade networks, the emergence of a “discourse” society, science and medicine, material culture and architecture, and the impact of Crusades and Mongol invasions.

Prerequisite: NMC273Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC380H1 - Religion in the Ancient Near East

Hours: 48S

Primary sources from Mesopotamia, Syria and the Levant reveal profound awareness of the human condition. What do they tell us about religion in the ancient Near East, and why do Judaism, Christianity and Islam share some stories? Takes a critical approach to the ways we read texts and reconstruct beliefs.

Prerequisite: 3 FCE in any field
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NMC384H1 - Life Cycle and Personal Status in Judaism

Hours: 24L

The course explores Jewish attitudes to various personal status issues, utilizing material from biblical and rabbinic sources to modern Jewish positions. The specific topics covered vary from year to year.

Recommended Preparation: NMC104H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

NMC446H1 - The Babylonian City

Hours: 24L

Examines the physical form of the Babylonian city in the first millennium BC as the setting for the daily activities of its inhabitants. The focus is on critical evaluation of archaeological and historical sources, and on investigating the relationship between city form and contemporary social structure.

Prerequisite: 9 FCE in any field
Recommended Preparation: NMC102H1, NMC346H1/​ NMC347H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC447H1 - The Neo-Assyrian Empire

Hours: 24L

Investigates how one of the world’s first empires worked. Topics include Assyrian kingship, imperial administration, and daily life as reflected in the written sources (royal inscriptions, official correspondence, and everyday documents) and archaeological evidence.

Prerequisite: 9 FCE in any field
Recommended Preparation: NMC102H1, NMC346H1/​ NMC347H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC449H1 - Mesopotamian Society and Economy

Hours: 24L

Examines Mesopotamian society and economy from third to first millennium BC, using everyday cuneiform documents in translation. Focuses on the key institutions (palace, temple, private household), tracing their changing organisation and economic role over the course of Mesopotamian history. Examines theoretical approaches to the study of ancient society and economy.

Prerequisite: 9 FCE in any field
Recommended Preparation: NMC102H1, NMC346H1/​ NMC347H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NMC468H1 - Seminar in Egyptian Archaeology II

Hours: 24S

Seminar focuses on the social and cultural development of Egypt from the Middle Kingdom through the Ptolemaic Period, engaging with major theories regarding urbanism, ethnicity, core-periphery relationships, cultural interaction, and social organization. An independent research project and hands-on experience with artifacts at the ROM are important features of the course. (Offered every 3 years.)

Prerequisite: NMC343H1, NMC344H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NMC471H1 - Advanced Topics in Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations

Hours: 24S

An advanced seminar organized around readings on a topic selected by the instructor.

Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

NML110Y1 - Elementary Standard Arabic

Hours: 96L/24P

This course is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Arabic. It places equal emphasis on the development of all language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The learning philosophy underlying this approach is that proficiency in a foreign language is best achieved through consistent, deliberate, and systematic practice. From the outset, students are strongly encouraged to develop the habit of consistently practicing learned material.

Prerequisite: Priority enrollment will be given to declared NMC majors/specialists.
Exclusion: Native speakers/ NML210Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML412H1 - Adab and Arabic Literary Prose

Hours: 24L

Students read original Arabic texts representing a rich variety of premodern prose genres. Critical review of scholarly approaches to adab, defined as the historic practice of teaching composition, and the canons used in that pedagogy. Texts include: Kalila wa-Dimna, travel narratives, 1001 Nights, and al-Jahiz.

Prerequisite: NML310Y1 (third-year Arabic) or permission of the instructor. Heritage speakers are encouraged to take this class, and should seek permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NML413H1 - Premodern Arabic Poetry

Hours: 24L

Every week we read a poem by a new poet, focusing on the most famous and frequently quoted poems of the pre-modern Arabic literary tradition. Students learn how to identify meters and recognize the rhetorical tropes described by Arabic rhetoric. Poets include: Labīd, Abū Nuwās, Abū Tammām, and al-Mutanabbī.

Prerequisite: NML310Y1 (third-year Arabic) or permission of the instructor. Heritage speakers are encouraged to take this class, and should seek permission of the instructor.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

NUS301H0 - Life Science Course B

A 3000-level Life Sciences (LSM) course offered at the National University of Singapore. For course offerings see: www.lifesciences.nus.edu.sg/lsm.html Prerequisites and Exclusions: see the EEB website (http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/undergrad/programs.htm)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

NUS302H0 - Life Science Course C

A 3000-level Life Sciences (LSM) course offered at the National University of Singapore. For course offerings see: www.lifesciences.nus.edu.sg/lsm.html Prerequisites and Exclusions: see the EEB website (http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/undergrad/programs.htm)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

NUS303H0 - Life Science Course D

A 3000-level Life Sciences (LSM) course offered at the National University of Singapore. For course offerings see: www.lifesciences.nus.edu.sg/lsm.html Prerequisites and Exclusions: see the EEB website (http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/undergrad/programs.htm)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

NUS304H0 - Life Science Course E

A 3000-level Life Sciences (LSM) course offered at the National University of Singapore. For course offerings see: www.lifesciences.nus.edu.sg/lsm.html Prerequisites and Exclusions: see the EEB website (http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/undergrad/programs.htm)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

NUS401H0 - Life Science Course F

A 4000-level Life Sciences (LSM) course offered at the National University of Singapore. For course offerings see: www.lifesciences.nus.edu.sg/lsm.html Prerequisites and Exclusions: see the EEB website (http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/undergrad/programs.htm)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

NUS402H0 - Life Science Course G

A 4000-level Life Sciences (LSM) course offered at the National University of Singapore. For course offerings see: www.lifesciences.nus.edu.sg/lsm.html Prerequisites and Exclusions: see the EEB website (http://www.eeb.utoronto.ca/undergrad/programs.htm)

Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCJ362H1 - Service Learning

In cooperation with the Center for Community Partnerships, students will be given a service learning placement that aligns with their academic interests. These placements will happen in community organizations and other organizations based in the GTA. Class will meet once a week and students will serve up to 10 hours total per week in their placements. The course will emphasize how groups work to achieve community goals, how grassroots politics works, the power of social capital, and how these topics link to questions of conflict resolution, brokering piece, and achieving justice.

Prerequisite: PCJ260Y1
Exclusion: PCJ361H1, PCJ363H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCJ363H1 - Study Abroad Module

Using Blackboard, students will meet once a week online in a virtual class that will assign readings, provide writing assignments, and culminate in a group assignment that situates the training from the PCJ program within the new materials that each student is experiencing in their new university. Each student will have to reflect on how their thinking has changed, what they will do with their new perspectives when they come back to U of T, and how this affects their thinking about peace, conflict, and justice.

Prerequisite: PCJ260Y1
Exclusion: PCJ361H1, PCJ362H1
Distribution Requirements: Social Science
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PCL200H1 - Drugs & the Brain

Hours: 24L

Lectures introduce students to prescribed and illicit drugs that affect the brain. Lectures cover drug pharmacology and explain how drugs alter mood, perception, cognition, and arousal by affecting different aspects of brain function. The societal impact of these prescribed and illicit drugs is also discussed

Prerequisite: None
Exclusion: PSY396H1, PCL302H1, BCH210H1, BCH242Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL366H1 - Basic Pharmacology and Toxicology Laboratory

Hours: 16T/32P

Through practical hands-on laboratory experiments and tutorials, students will be introduced to some basic experimental techniques and laboratory skills that are used within pharmacology and toxicology research. (Ancillary lab fee $25)

Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PSL300H1/​ PSL301H1
Corequisite: PCL302H1
Exclusion: PCL365Y1/​ PCL471Y1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL461H1 - Advanced Pharmacology and Toxicology Laboratory

Hours: 12T/36P

Advanced laboratory exercises and discussions through tutorials and presentations in selected areas of pharmacology. Enrollment in this course is generally restricted to students enrolled in the Pharmacology Specialist and Pharmacology and Biomedical Toxicology Specialist programs. (Ancillary lab fee $25).

Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, PSL300H1/​ PSL301H1, PCL366H1
Exclusion: PCL365Y1/​ PCL471Y1
Recommended Preparation: PCL469H1
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL475Y1 - Neuropsychopharmacology

Hours: 72L/24T

Major neuro-psychiatric disease syndromes: clinical pathology and neuronal abnormalities; CNS drugs: theories and mechanisms of action.

Prerequisite: A minimum of 9.0 FCE
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PCL491H1 - Clinical Pharmacology Principles and Practice

Hours: 8L/8T/24P

This course will examine the practical and experimental aspects of clinical pharmacology and toxicology. Through practical applications and experiments, students will develop their knowledge in Good Laboratory Practice/Good Clinical Practice, critical evaluation and analysis skills through: performing pharmacokinetic experiments (evaluating Vd, half-life, and clearance); examining case studies and primary literature in regards to drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions.

This elective course can apply towards their program requirements in our Specialist and Major streams and will only be available to fourth year students. The course will meet a need for expanding students' comprehension in clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics in a hands-on, practical and advanced manner. Students will be evaluated on both written and oral communication skills, team work as well as data analysis and interpretation and critical thinking skills.

(Ancillary lab fee $25)

Prerequisite: PCL201H1, PCL302H1, at least 15 FCE and completion of upper level laboratory course.
Recommended Preparation: PCL469H1, PCL470H1 or PCL473Y1. Completion of an upper level laboratory course ( PCL366H1, PSL372H1, BCH370H1)
Distribution Requirements: Science
Breadth Requirements: Living Things and Their Environment (4)

PHL100Y1 - Introduction to Philosophy

Hours: 48L/24T

An introduction to the central branches of philosophy, such as logic, theory of knowledge, metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy. Writings from the central figures in the history of Western and non-Western philosophy, as well as contemporary philosophers, may be considered.

Exclusion: PHL101Y1, PHL102Y1, PHL201H1, PHLA10H3, PHLA11H3, PHL101H5, PHL102H5, PHL105Y5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL101Y1 - Introduction to Philosophical Problems

Hours: 48L/24T

An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Examples of questions that may be considered include: What is sound reasoning? What can we know? What is ultimately real? Is morality rational? Do humans have free will? Is there a God? What is consciousness? Should we fear death? What is justice?

Exclusion: PHL100Y1, PHL201H1, PHLA10H3, PHLA11H3, PHL101H5, PHL102H5, PHL105Y5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL200Y1 - Ancient Philosophy

Hours: 72L

Central texts of the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, and post-Aristotelian philosophy.

Exclusion: PHLB31H3, PHL202H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL201H1 - Introductory Philosophy

Hours: 36L

An introduction to philosophy focusing on the connections among its main branches: logic, theory of knowledge, metaphysics, and ethics. This course is intended for those with little or no philosophy background but who have completed four FCEs in any subject.

Prerequisite: Four FCEs in any subject
Exclusion: PHL100Y1, PHL101Y1, or more than 1.0 PHL course
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL210Y1 - 17th-and 18th-Century Philosophy

Hours: 72L

Central texts of such philosophers as Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

Exclusion: PHLB35H3, PHL210Y5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL232H1 - Knowledge and Reality

Hours: 36L

An introduction to issues in the fundamental branches of philosophy: metaphysics, which considers the overall framework of reality; epistemology, or the theory of knowledge; and related problems in the philosophy of science. Topics in metaphysics may include: mind and body, causality, space and time, God, freedom and determinism; topics in epistemology may include perception, evidence, belief, truth, skepticism.

Exclusion: PHLB20H3, PHLB60H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL235H1 - Philosophy of Religion

Hours: 36L

Some central issues in the philosophy of religion such as the nature of religion and religious faith, arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, varieties of religious experience, religion and human autonomy.

Exclusion: PHL235H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL240H1 - Persons, Minds and Bodies

Hours: 36L

Consciousness and its relation to the body; personal identity and survival; knowledge of other minds; psychological events and behaviour.

Exclusion: PHLB81H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL243H1 - Philosophy of Human Sexuality

Hours: 36L

Philosophical issues about sex and sexual identity in the light of biological, psychological and ethical theories of sex and gender; the concept of gender; male and female sex roles; perverse sex; sexual liberation; love and sexuality.

Exclusion: PHLB12H3, PHL243H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL244H1 - Human Nature

Hours: 36L

Aspects of human nature, e.g., emotion, instincts, motivation. Theories of human nature, e.g., behaviourism, psychoanalysis.

Exclusion: PHLB91H3, PHL244H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL245H1 - Modern Symbolic Logic

Hours: 36L

The application of symbolic techniques to the assessment of arguments. Propositional calculus and quantification theory. Logical concepts, techniques of natural deduction.

Exclusion: PHLB50H3, PHL245H5
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL246H1 - Probability and Inductive Logic

Hours: 36L

The elements of axiomatic probability theory and its main interpretations (frequency, logical, and subjective). Reasoning with probabilities in decision-making and science.

Exclusion: PHL246H5
Recommended Preparation: PHL245H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL247H1 - Critical Reasoning

Hours: 36L

The area of informal logic - the logic of ordinary language, usually non-deductive. Criteria for the critical assessment of arguments as strong or merely persuasive. Different types of arguments and techniques of refutation; their use and abuse.

Exclusion: TRN200Y1, PHL145H5, PHL247H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL265H1 - Introduction to Political Philosophy

Hours: 36L

An introduction to central issues in political philosophy, e.g., political and social justice, liberty and the criteria of good government. The writings of contemporary political philosophers, as well as major figures in the history of philosophy, may be considered.

Exclusion: PHLB17H3, PHL265H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PHL271H1 - Law and Morality

Hours: 36L

Justifications for the legal enforcement of morality; particular ethical issues arising out of the intersection of law and morality, such as punishment, freedom of expression and censorship, autonomy and paternalism, constitutional protection of human rights.

Exclusion: PHLB11H3, PHL271H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PHL273H1 - Environmental Ethics

Hours: 36L

A study of environmental issues raising questions of concern to moral and political philosophers, such as property rights, responsibility for future generations, and the interaction of human beings with the rest of nature. Typical issues: sustainable development, alternative energy, the preservation of wilderness areas, animal rights.

Exclusion: PHLB02H3, PHL273H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PHL275H1 - Introduction to Ethics

Hours: 36L

An introduction to central issues in ethics or moral philosophy, such as the objectivity of values, the nature of moral judgements, rights and duties, the virtues, and consequentialism. Readings may be drawn from a variety of contemporary and historical sources.

Exclusion: PHLB07H3, PHL275H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL281H1 - Bioethics (formerly PHL281Y1)

Hours: 36L

An introduction to the study of moral and legal problems in medical practice and in biomedical research; the development of health policy. Topics include: concepts of health and disease, patient rights, informed consent, allocation of scarce resources, euthanasia, abortion, genetic and reproductive technologies, human research, and mental health.

Exclusion: PHL281Y1, PHLB09H3, PHL283H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PHL285H1 - Aesthetics

Hours: 36L

An historical and systematic introduction to the main questions in the philosophy of art and beauty from Plato to the present. These include the relation between art and beauty, the nature of aesthetic experience, definitions and theories of art, the criteria of excellence in the arts, and the function of art criticism.

Exclusion: PHLB03H3, PHL285H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

PHL295H1 - Business Ethics

Hours: 36L

Philosophical issues in ethics, social theory, and theories of human nature insofar as they bear on contemporary conduct of business. Issues include: Does business have moral responsibilities? Can social costs and benefits be calculated? Does modern business life determine human nature or the other way around? Do political ideas and institutions such as democracy have a role within business?

Exclusion: PHLB06H3, PHL295H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Society and its Institutions (3)

PHL303H1 - Plato

Hours: 36L

Selected metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical themes in Plato’s dialogues.

Prerequisite: PHL200Y1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHL301H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL304H1 - Aristotle

Hours: 36L

Selected anthropological, ethical and metaphysical themes in the works of Aristotle.

Prerequisite: PHL200Y1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHL302H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL310H1 - The Rationalists

Hours: 36L

Central philosophical problems in philosophers such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and their contemporaries.

Prerequisite: PHL210Y1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHLC35H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL311H1 - The Empiricists

Hours: 36L

Central philosophical problems in philosophers such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and their contemporaries.

Prerequisite: PHL210Y1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHLC36H3
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL313H1 - Topics in 17th and 18th Century Philosophy

Hours: 36L

Central philosophical problems arising in the early modern period.

Prerequisite: PHL210Y1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHL313H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL314H1 - Kant (formerly PHL312H1)

Hours: 36L

A systematic study of The Critique of Pure Reason.

Prerequisite: PHL210Y1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHL312H1, PHLC37H3, PHL314H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL315H1 - Topics in 19th-Century Philosophy

Hours: 36L

Central philosophical problems arising in the 19th century.

Prerequisite: PHL210Y1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHL315H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL322H1 - Contemporary Continental Philosophy

Hours: 36L

German and French philosophy after World War II, focusing on such topics as: debates about humanism, hermeneutics, critical theory, the structuralist movement, its successors such as deconstruction. Typical authors: Heidegger, Gadamer, Habermas, Levi-Strauss, Foucault, Derrida.

Prerequisite: PHL217H1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHL324H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL325H1 - Early Analytic Philosophy

Hours: 36L

An examination of some of the classic texts of early analytic philosophy, concentrating on the work of Frege, Russell, and Wittgenstein.

Prerequisite: PHL245H1/​ MAT157Y1 and one of PHL232H1/​ PHL233H1/​ PHL240H1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHLC43H3, PHL325H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL331H1 - Metaphysics

Hours: 36L

Historical and systematic approaches to topics in metaphysics, such as the nature of reality, substance and existence, necessity and possibility, causality, universals and particulars.

Prerequisite: PHL232H1/​ PHL233H1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHLC60H3, PHL332H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

PHL332H1 - Epistemology

Hours: 36L

Historical and systematic approaches to topics in the theory of knowledge, such as truth, belief, justification, perception, a priori knowledge, certitude, skepticism, other minds.

Prerequisite: PHL232H1/​ PHL233H1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy
Exclusion: PHLC20H3, PHL333H5
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: